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  5. "Jag skyndar mig."

"Jag skyndar mig."

Translation:I am hurrying.

December 2, 2014

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frankk1m

I'm in a hurry? -- Should that work or no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anrui

No, that would be "Jag har bråttom"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DenOrangeMannen

If I understand the difference, if someone's waiting for you, you might tell them 'Jag skyndar mig', but if you're waiting on someone else, you might say 'Jag har bråttom'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ecolitan

I agree, this should be a test of Swedish, not English grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoTaffer

Would "Jag skyndar" not carry the same meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

It can also be non-reflexive but I find that it’s more idiomatic if you have the ”mig” in at least this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Archybalds

It's the same with the romanian equivalent " Eu ma grabesc " , where " grabesc" also needs " ma " to make sense, because it's reflexive verb . Brilliant !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElitePowerGamer

Or in French: Je me dépêche.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agneseinthenorth

Is this what Dépêche Mode means?! :O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amduskias

Une dépêche can also be a newspaper


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JDLENL

Are all of the verbs in Present 9 reflexive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

All except överraskar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TMUM4

Can you also say 'Jag skyndar på mig' meaning the same thing? If so, is there any difference in nuance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TMUM4

No-one else commented on this so I have researched it and it seems that 'Jag skyndar mig.' means I hurry, and 'Jag skyndar på mig.' means to hurry up or get faster (at whatever is referred to), ie bring about an increase in the tempo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arna1cb

Could you say 'I hurry up' as well? Has it any difference in the meaning? Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Virtmining

How would it be "Hurry up!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Skynda dig/er!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Virtmining

Is it the same for "wake up"? something like "Vakna(r) dig"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

No, "vakna" is not reflexive, so it's just "vakna!".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason158996

Is "I am hurrying" the closest to the literal translation? It seems like "I hurry myself" is the true meaning here, and that "I am hurrying" is just a nicer way to say that in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChloeWReuben

What would "I am rushing" be in Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BabySeaTurtles

How does one tell if the "sk-" lettering will make the conventional english sk sound or the swishy sk sound (as is the case here)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

The rule is that it sounds like 'sk' before 'hard' vowels a o u å and the other sound before 'soft' vowels e i y ä ö
Exceptions apply e.g. in loan words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inali-k2

Is the term "softening vowels" ever used, since these vowels do soften the preceding consonant but are not actually any softer than "a o u å"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigswedeej

I am rushing doesnt work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wulfram3

Is this related with the German "(jemanden) schinden", which means to physically abuse someone, e.g. with hard work or punishment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevie442918

This might be one of the hardest words to pronounce for a native English speaker. "blow out the candles" while "stick out your chin" at the same time ^o^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzaakFairc

I hurry myself seems like a good english translation to me. Only due to it being reflexive. Am I wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PennLesley

English wouldn't normally be 'I hurry myself.' Maybe 'I am hurrying.' in reply to 'Hurry up' or 'l always hurry myself' in reply to 'I hurry to work's But in Generally we hurry to do something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzaakFairc

Well I'm English and hear the verb 'to hurry' used as a reflexive verb very often. "I am hurrying myself along", "hurry yourself up" etc. Might be dialectal, but I've heard both my northern father and my central mother use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PennLesley

That explains it my background is south!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IzaakFairc

That's probably it.

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