"O gato toma seu leite."

Translation:The cat drinks its milk.

7/9/2013, 7:55:22 PM

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mr.jfast

Why is toma used here instead of bebe?

7/16/2013, 10:18:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Both are correct and should be accepted. "Tomar" sounds a bit more informal.

7/17/2013, 1:20:36 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/mhartog1

I thought tomar was used by example ordering in a restaurant, is that correct? When you say in a restaurant: I take milk, Eu tomo leite?

6/8/2014, 7:05:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Both tomar and beber are used in a restaurant... =)

6/9/2014, 4:51:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/peduzzi
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At least where I live, we also use "beber" when referring to alcoholic drinks. "Ele está bebendo demais" / "Hoje eu vou beber" / "Não posso beber, pois estou tomando remédios" / "Ela é do tipo que bebe"

7/18/2013, 1:35:19 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/nomegiusto

why is the cat takes his milk incorrect?

7/9/2013, 7:55:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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That should be correct once "take" also means "drink"

7/9/2013, 8:07:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/nomegiusto

they system marks it wrong. Thank you.

7/9/2013, 8:26:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheweeman
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Take should be an alternative answer! Not a wrong one...

2/5/2014, 11:10:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KoppaAca

if we learned on basic that Bebem is drink ,why is toma not takes correct .fix this

12/26/2013, 3:55:44 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/UserBob
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Whatever "toma" or "bebe". BebeM is plural (they drink)

7/7/2015, 2:08:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/gabriellespeaks

Why not "o" seu?

3/29/2014, 6:59:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Otaku2Learn
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Wouldn't it be the cat takes its milk? I'm not so sure why a form of beber wasn't used.

3/21/2016, 12:35:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/zaniac

Could this also be read as ' the cat drinks your milk'? How would it differ otherwise?

5/26/2014, 8:33:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Yes, they mean the same. To make it not ambiguous:

  • teu leite= your milk
  • o leite dele = its milk.
5/26/2014, 9:17:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Yusuf255442

please, what is the difference between seu, sau, teu, tau

9/16/2015, 6:15:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

> please, what is the difference between seu, sau, teu, tau

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It is "Sua" and "Tua" rather than "Sau" and "Tau" to start. :)

Yes, it is confusing since the last two letters change and scramble. Change the "e" to "a and switch with the "u" (and vice versa) to change the genders.

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Sua is the feminine while Seu is the masculine singular possessive for 3rd person declension from the possessed noun. "Leite" is normally masculine. But if it is water then it is feminine "Água" instead. "Seu Leite/Sua Água."

Tua is the feminine while Teu is the masculine singular possessive for 2nd person declension from the possessed noun. "Leite" is normally masculine. But if it is water then it is feminine "Água" instead. Teu Leite/Tua Água."

The root words, "Seu" and "Teu are "Eu" ("I" in English) with "caps" on their fronts.

Both these have plurals when there is more than one in the possessed noun. So "Seus Leites/Suas Águas, Teus Leites/Tuas Águas."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declension

Think of "declension" as "conjugation" for the non-verb words in a sentence that support nouns (which do not change much unless actually referring to real males or females rather than a hypothetical word gender; and then of course for plurals).

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Here is where it gets tricky. Você is used extensively in Brazil (less so in Portugal and the other Portuguese speaking countries) and means "you" but in the 3rd Person, and this form originally was more formal/polite than "Tu" (which is the familiar 2nd Person originally reserved for close/dear friends, family, servants, and those below you in rank for instance). Seus/Suas being for the 3rd Person – think of royalty & rank, "Would her highness like the covers turned down?" or, "Would the general like me to file the papers?" even if speaking directly to the person, it is deflected from the direct (once considered rude) questioning; taking on a way of showing subservience (or at least it did till it hit the Americas!).

So being 3rd Person, Seu/Sua also refers to His and Hers, Its and Theirs, as well as Yours... which leads to confusion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%E2%80%93V_distinction

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%E2%80%93V_distinction#Portuguese

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One of the ways it seems that Brazil has solved the confusion (at least in some regions) of adopting "você" as the familiar (everyday) usage for "you" is to (in some regions) use the 2nd person possessive (teu/tua) while still using the 3rd Person pronoun (você with possessive teu/tua).

This is how languages change over time

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The other language strategy is to use a contraction of "de" (for "of") and the personal "s/he" (ele/a) pronouns to make the words, "dele/dela" which come after the possessed noun and do not decline, or change gender to suit the nouns, as now it is rather talking about the "water of his" ("a água dele") or "milk of hers" ("o leite dela") as examples.

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Meanwhile in Portugal (where the language originated), "tu" is now much more common than "você" but você is still used in some more formal (stiff) cases:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/voc%C3%AA

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And in this topic example "O gato toma seu leite", the personal pronoun takes on the gender of the possessed noun which in the Duolingo sentence is masculine (leite) so we will switch in a feminine (água) on some of the below examples to help illustrate for your question.

O (masculine article for The) gato (masculine for cat) toma (3rd person/object verb conjugation for take/drink) seu (possessive pronoun in the masculine attached to the object noun to follow) leite (object masculine noun for milk).

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So... (keeping in mind that tomar means both take & drink):

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• "O gato toma seu leite." (the cat takes its/his/her/your/their milk)

• "A gata toma seu leite." (the [female] cat takes its/his/her/your/their milk)

See the ambiguity in the above?

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But with the 2nd person possessive (in the singular), that falls away:

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• "O gato toma teu leite." (the cat takes your milk)

• "A gata toma teu leite." (the [female] cat takes your milk)

• "Os gatos tomam seus leite." (the cats take their/his/her/your/its milk – "it" here could be the dog losing out)

• "As gatas tomam seus leite." (the [female] cats take their/his/her/your/its milk)

• "Os gatos tomam teus leite." (the cats take your milk)

• "As gatas tomam teus leite." (the [female] cats take your milk)

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Or the feminine form of the personal pronouns in sentences:

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• "O gato toma tua água." (the cat takes your water)

• "A gata toma tua água." (the [female] cat takes your water)

• "Os gatos tomam suas água." (the cats take their/his/her/your/its water – "it" here could be the hamster losing out)

• "As gatas tomam suas água." (the [female] cats take their/his/her/your/its water)

• "Os gatos tomam tuas água." (the cats take your water)

• "As gatas tomam tuas água." (the [female] cats take your water)

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But for 'you take/drink ____ milk' it could look like these examples:

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• "Você toma seu leite." (you take your/his/her/its/their milk).

• "Tu tomas teu leite." (you take your milk)

• "Você toma teu leite." (you take your milk – Brazilian here 3rd Person pronoun with 2nd Person possessive)

• "Você toma seus leites.*" (you take your/his/her/their/its milks)

• "Você toma teus leites." (you take your milks – Brazilian here 3rd Person pronoun with 2nd Person possessive*)

• Tu tomas teus leites.*" (you take your milks)

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Okay, further complicating all this, in Brazil it is optional to add the articles into the sentences before the simple possessives even if the articles do not add really to the meaning or translation, but not adding them is less optional in Portugal (and other countries using Portuguese).

So to modify a handful of examples from above (just to give an idea):

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• "O gato toma o seu leite." (the cat takes its/his/her/their milk)

• "O gata toma a teu leite." (the [female] cat takes your milk)

• "Você toma os seus leites." (you take your/his/her/their/its milks)

• "Você toma os teus leites." (you take your milk - Brazilian form of 3rd Person pronoun with 2nd Person possessive)

• "Tu tomas os teus leites. (you take your milks)

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or to show a couple feminine object (possessed) noun versions as examples:

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• "Tu tomas a tua água." (you take your water)

• "Tu tomas as tuas águas." (you take your waters)

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This knowledge of using the article before the possessive helps us however when we start to eliminate the ambiguities, as in the examples below:

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• "Você toma o leite dele." (you take the milk of his)

• "Você toma o leite dela." (you take the milk of hers)

• "Você toma o leite deles." (you take the milk of theirs - their milk))

• "Você toma o leite delas." (you take the milk of theirs [multiple females])

• "Tu tomas o leite dela." (you take the milk of hers)

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Finally:

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• "Os gatos tomam o leite de vocês." (The cats take the milk of yours – in the plural 'you all' sense)

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I hope I have that all correct, and without typos. =)

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Let's end with EXTRA CREDIT

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• "A vaca bebe o próprio leite dela! (the cow drinks her own milk).

:)

3/1/2017, 8:00:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/wondermum79

Please correct me if I am wrong, but I believe the difference is gender. Teu being male, Tua being female, And so on with seu, sua

11/1/2015, 7:46:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisBergm

It says. The cat drinks their milk. I put The cat drinks its milk. It should be cats drink or its.

11/8/2015, 11:19:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JSwanson409

I read this as "The cat drinks your milk". How would I actually say that?

11/20/2015, 2:48:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NealDonnel

Couldn't the spoken also by transcribed as "O gato tomou seu leite?" Different meaning, but sounds the same.

5/7/2014, 3:30:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Well, the sound, writing, and meaning are different! It can't be accepted.... =/

5/7/2014, 4:43:49 AM
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