"Er wird nicht gehen."

Translation:He will not go.

December 2, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JohnOtis

It did not accept "He will not be going".. This is the same as "He will not go"

Reporting this one too.

December 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/bynny2015

As of June 2016, both "He will not be going" and "He will not go." are both accepted as answers.

Just to clarify, in English the the two sentences can have slightly different meanings.

"He will not be going" could imply that he he is not able to go.

"He will not go." could imply that he really doesn't want to go, he is refusing to go.

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ann390834

Why ist it "gehen" and not "geht"?

April 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

"Gehen", just like "go" in the English sentence, is not conjugated, it's in the infinitive. "Wird" and "will" are the conjugated verbs. (Actually the modal "will" is not exactly conjugated in English; it's what we call "defective").

(Here "go" takes the form of the bare infinitive, as opposed to the to-infinitive, which is why it's harder to spot, but note that it's not "goes".)

April 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ann390834

Ok, thank you so much. :)

April 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Multieman

I still don't understand.

September 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

When the verb "go" is conjugated, it changes form in the third-person singular: "he goes". It's the same in German: "er geht".

But when you have an auxiliary (a helping verb), in many constructions you keep the main verb in the infinitive. For example, we say "he has to go". Here, "to go" is the infinitive, and it translates to "gehen". We call it the "to-infinitive", because it the word "to" is part of it. The helping verb, "have", is conjugated as "has", and is no longer in the infintive.

In the case of "he will go", the word "go" is still in the infinitive, but it's in a different form, without "to", that we call the "bare infinitive", and it's still translated to "gehen". It's a little complicated in English, because "will" is not exactly conjugated. (Note that we don't say "he wills go".) It's actually a subjunctive modal, which we call "defective" because it's lost its conjugated forms. But in German, the verb "werden" is in fact conjugated; for the third-person singular it becomes "wird". "Gehen" remains in the infinitive.

September 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/eunae.eunae

Why now he's not going

October 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

Unlike "he's not going", the German sentence is explicitly in the future tense.

See my comment to rickjmill.

October 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnOtis

I am having problems with the future tense lesson because DUO does not support the 'will be doing' structure.

http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/28234/will-be-doing-vs-will-do

December 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

It is a bad structure, but I really want to emphasize that it will be best if you never translate anything in German as "he is going" but rather "he goes" because it will confuse you much less.

December 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Davarrel

He will not leave is correct

August 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AliAthar2

How come 'nicht' is appearing before the verb here? Is this always the case in future tense? Or is it that 'wirt' itself is considered a verb?

September 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

Yes, exactly, "wird" itself is a verb (and the conjugated verb in the sentence).

September 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ariel.j.bi

Why was "he shall not go" rejected?

November 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

"Will" is much more common for simply describing the future (at least in North American English). "Shall" is a little old-fashioned, though it's still used in contracts etc., e.g. to enumerate the parties' duties.

November 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/hechap

So, here's an elaboration. Is it correct? " Ich mache mir Sogen, dass wird er nicht p√ľnktlich ankommen." I worry that he will not arrive on time.

May 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/vwsheldon

Why is the inconsistency: gehen translated here as "leave," and in another question, "leave" is marked as incorrect and it is translated as "walk."

December 29, 2018
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