"Hon har en miljon vänner."

Translation:She has a million friends.

December 3, 2014

27 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DehPuh

I just gave you five lingots. I love you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DogePamyuPamyu

Omöjligt... The most you can have is 5,000 on a private account... That is why I cannot send Eefje de Visser a friend request. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bepisTM

Oh my god, I showed this sentence to a friend while adding "på Facebook" to it... then I saw this.. what the


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevieJay255

Nej. På MySpace


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertAdonias

the moment I translated the phrase, the "Social Network" soundtrack started playing in my head :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevinralfi

that's what i'm thinking too :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jagubben

Nej. På Instagram. Eller Twitter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ViolentRed

I can see Swedes are also great at exaggeration :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shurhaian

It doesn't make a difference here, but touches on it: Does Swedish use the long or short scale of large numbers? That is, is a billion a thousand millions, or a million millions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

We use the long scale. I'll use numbers to ensure I don't screw up. :)

  • en miljon = 1 000 000 = an English million
  • en miljard = 1 000 000 000 = a modern English billion
  • en biljon = 1 000 000 000 000 = a modern English trillion

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babbeloergosum

Cool, it works the same way in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shurhaian

Exactly what I needed, thank you very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stoffeltjie

Cool, it works the same in Afrikaans.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan231405

I just noticed that Swedish doesn't use commas to group their large numbers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahferroin7

Late answer, but this is rather common to a lot of European languages. The standard is typically using spaces for digit grouping, and a comma (instead of a full stop) for the decimal point, though there are odd exceptions in some places (I know there are some locales that use spaces for grouping but a full stop for the decimal point).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan231405

I had to look up what the long short scales were; I had never heard of them before now. For anyone else curious: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hdhdhdhx

Would you ever say ett miljon if it was describing an ett word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardB_Lebanon

No. Its en miljon. It is the miljon we are talking about hereo matter what comes after it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CadklZ

I dont really understand the long scale of numbers, a milkion million is not a billion. Thats mathematically incorrect. It would be a trillion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shurhaian

It's not a universal truism of mathematics - that's the whole problem. It's regional. In other regions, the words are defined such that a million million IS a billion. It is not a question of mathematics, but one of linguistics. What is "mathematically correct" is that 1 000 000 x 1 000 000 = 1 000 000 000 000, but exactly what you CALL that number varies - not just between language families (Swedish isn't the only one to use the long scale, I'm pretty sure), but even between English-speaking regions.

SI prefixes, on the other hand, ARE standard. 1 Mm = 10^6 m, and that's true wherever you are. This linguistic collision of terms is why scientific notation exists


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CadklZ

I see, but the meaning of the word million is still the same. In that it is 1,000,000.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiteo

...but if en biljon means 10^12 then why not??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsabelLopes22

Is there a difference between "vän" and "kompis"?

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