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"The Secretary of Defense had a meeting with the President."

Translation:El Secretario de Defensa tuvo una reunión con el Presidente.

5 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

I do not agree that the Secretary of a US Cabinet office is titled the same as a Minister of a cabinet from a country with a parliamentary system of government. A US cabinet officer is appointed by the President, but is not an independently elected officer, thus not a "Minister"...in countries with a parliamentary system, you have to first be an elected minister...that is represent some sort of "riding" before you can be in the Cabinet of the Prime Minister.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenHo
KenHo
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Until terminology changes in recent years, the Secretary of a Department was the permanent public servant in charge, the Minister was the appointed MP to whom the Secretary reported. In Australia, these are two clearly differentiated positions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott5940

I also agree and am reporting it as a problem.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RenBosman

I agree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure

DL has an error here and needs to fix it. A US Secretary is not the same thing as a Minister.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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If you read the discussion further up, you will see this phrase has nothing to do with the USA. In other countries (of which there are many) they are one and the same in particular job titles. You can tell this is a job title and not generic words as they are capitalised.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidRussnak

While you are correct, (and all of us need to remember that there's an entire world outside of the US), the fact remains that these positions are not synonymous. Differences vary based on country, one of which is the fact that one is elected and the other appointed. But they vary in quite a few other ways. This is an error and requires correcting.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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It's not an error. It is a phrase that needs translation, that's all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I agree that the issue shouldn't have anything to do with the way any English dialect treats "Secretary" vs. "Minister". The question is how the Spanish-speaking world treats Secretario/a vs. Ministro/a.

The thing that bothers me about Duo's equivalent treatment is that the two Spanish words are formal titles. It's not a question of the difference between a government secretary/minister, but the difference between El/La Secretario/a de... and El/La Ministro/a de.... Usually, there's only one such title for an office in either English or Spanish.

So, I think Duo is wrong in this case to translate a formal title with such ambivalence to the actual title.

It it is acceptable in Spanish to change an official title from Secretary to Minister without a second thought, then Duo's equivalent treatment is valid. My linguistic sensibilities say that Duo is wrong here.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucalu4
lucalu4
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Sin lugar a dudas, en España un ministro no es lo mismo que un secretario.. De hecho, cada ministerio tiene su ministro correspondiente, y dentro de este ministerio hay un secretario (normalmente uno) del mismo a disposición del ministro, que a su vez es nombrado por el presidente del gobierno.. Y te lo digo porque en España, en estas últimas fechas por desgracia, estamos muy al día de política.. Saludos

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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I may have missed something, but I'm not sure what the problem is. The sentence doesn't say anything about the US and seems a perfectly reasonable phrase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

Im not from the US either but to me, a minister is an elected official and a secretary is an appointed official. So I would consider it an important difference.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Thank heavens you said this because I am currently in Peru, where there are ministers and a president (a recently named Prime Minister even), and all this fussiness about how "it doesn't apply to the United States so it must be wrong" was making me hear the blood in my head.

Examples of how this is encounter is EVEN POSSIBLE:

http://www.mofa.gov.sa/sites/mofaen/ServicesAndInformation/news/GovernmentNews/Pages/ArticleID201531911507701.aspx

http://www.mod.mil.gr/mod/en/

The only thing I would add is that you missed is that there is nothing in this phrase that even suggests that the two politicians are from the same government.

http://www.mofa.gov.sa/sites/mofaen/ServicesAndInformation/news/GovernmentNews/Pages/ArticleID201531911507701.aspx

You gets lingots for being nice when I would have just been pissy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaconChomper
BaconChomper
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American here. I'm not concerned with what country does what for politics. To each their own. That said, the point is that minister and secretary are not synonyms in English. That is why (I perceive that) people are commenting on this. I am unaware if they are the same thing in Spanish or specifically where you are from. Consider that in English; to know is saber AND conocer, to be is estar AND ser, for is por AND para etc. There are differences between languages that need to be noted. I think the common goal here is to learn enough to be articulate in each language we study.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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Ahh,I see. You are taking the word "Secretary" alone and not the capitalised 'Secretary of Defense" as a phrase. "Secretary of State" definitely shows in my thesaurus related to Minister.

A 'secretary' (in lower case and alone) is an entirely different thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaconChomper
BaconChomper
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Correct. I was not focused on the capitalization but the words themselves. If duo has them programmed as synonyms then we are in trouble. A secretary can be a high level government official or a subordinate office employee. A minister can also be a high level government official (though I don't believe we use them so I personally don't understand their particular role) or a religious figure in specific faiths like Baptist Christianity (There may be others I am not certain).

For the sake of this sentence and its synonymous use of those two words, to me that is comparable to speaking of two countries where one has a President and the other a Prime Minister and using those terms interchangeably. Referring to the Prime Minister of one country as their President or vice versa is just not an accurate translation. That is my only concern, I just want to learn the precise terminology without ambiguity.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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In Spanish there is also a distinct and substantial difference between the words, but had you read what I write elsewhere here you would see that my point is that there is not a meaningful distinction between the positions described by Minister/Secretary of Defense. jamaud understands this, so I know that I am not going out on a limb here on my own.

The reason I inserted myself so aggressively into this discussion is that this is a clear example of the duo staff doing exactly what so many on this site demand, and they have broadened a word-choice to meet the very predictable objections along the lines of "but there is no difference between the two titles". Just as predictably the response has been a collective "Oh I just cannot agree with this since it is not what I responded."

The particular hypocrisy of this position is blatant. This is a pointless knee-jerk reaction conditioned into people who just want to complain about something. NOT ONE OF THE COMMENTERS HERE GOT THIS WRONG. I have largely given up arguing with the people who only want to have a right answer no matter the cost. But here? Every complaint here is about maintaining a level of English language purity that these same users explicitly argue against on 98% of the comment boards.

I extend to you the same challenge I offered to SMAGringo. If you can demonstrate a meaningful and consistent definitional difference between the roles and responsibilities between "Secretary of Defense" and "Minister of Defense" that is free of the context of any one government, I will be pleased and obliged to change my mind and my comments here accordingly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaconChomper
BaconChomper
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If that was directed at me, I don't think you understood my angle.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjmkeogh

Why does one correct answer use a capital 'S' for Secretario and the other correct answer uses a lower case 's' for secretario?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
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I reported this as a problem of type "other".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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They've corrected this now and all is capitalised signifying this is a title

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene_rubin

sorry for the confusion, all some of us are saying is that a minister and a secretary are not the same, we would not translate minister as secretary or secretary as minister. In countries with a parliamentary system, the title is minister; in countries with a presidential system, the title is likely to be secretary, but in either case, one would follow the usage in the sentence. the sentence talks about secretary, so the translation would be secretary, not minister.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JKrogh

La secretaria de Defensa tuvo una reunión con el Presidente. El Secretario de Defensa tuvo una reunión con el Presidente. why is one capitalized and the other not?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daniel.w
daniel.w
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why not tenía

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samkafin

Would "tuvo una cita", also mean "had a meeting/appointment"? Maybe its not used in that context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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There is a usage difference in with whom you have a cita and the purpose of a reunión.

  • Yo tuve una cita - "I had an appointment/meeting/date" with a friend, acquaintance, or doctor.
  • Yo tuve una reunión -"I had a (business) meeting" with associates, or even friends and family if the meaning you want to convey is a formal sit-down with an agenda.

Given the use of the job titles rather than personal names, the implication here is that this was a business meeting, hence reunión.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimCzarkow

No aceptó una cita para mi tampoco. ¿Alguien sabe si es correcto? Gracias por su ayuda.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvidAmbro

Why is the masculine capitalozed but not the feminine?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GORDON6428

Threw me a wobbly. In my book Secretary does not equal Minister.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaSpiroXhardo
LindaSpiroXhardo
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Minister = from the Latin: the one who help Derivative of "minus, minor", with a suffix -ter indicating the comparison between two. Secretary = derivation of "secret"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J_oseBravo

¿Ministro and secretaria are the same? I don't understand. Help me please.

(En español son figuras muy distintas, no sé si en inglés son lo mismo)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/starhilltesco

A secretary is not a minister

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaud
jamaud
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With a small s no, but with a capital S it can be. Depending on the country. See the earlier discussion up thread.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/starhilltesco

Point taken jamaud

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JorgLovoll

I think every one of the multiple choices could be correct, even the one with "la presidenta"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TallRoberto

I chose secretario. It's correct. Secretary is not ministro. Questions with answers like this are not helpful

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theassecla

No es cierto! Secretary no es lo mismo que Minister.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alessandro317522

No no and no, secretary and minister are two different things

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanneBrown1

In the UK secretary of defence and minister of defence are not the same

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brackenwood3

Tired of misleading "helpful" hints!!

6 months ago