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  5. "Hästen äter min halsduk."

"Hästen äter min halsduk."

Translation:The horse is eating my scarf.

December 4, 2014

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

A common Swedish problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olesja386275

I thought, in Sweden moslty Älgar do it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissMuse

Dogs eating my food, cats drinking my milk, and now horses eating my scarves. What's next? Will ducks steal my car? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrMicroChem

When do we learn, "My dog ate my homework"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swede100

Hunden åt min läxa. Though most schools in Sweden don't have homework until 8th grade!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrMicroChem

Tack för det. And as a teacher, I agree. Unstructured time and play are so critical for learning and creativity...and so under appreciated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikLeh2

I had "you are drinking my cats milk XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iddie6

Duck Tales, Ooooh!~


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quteck

Hahahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yellkaa

'halsduk' sounds pretty close to russian 'галстук'(galstuk) wich means 'tie'. Is 'halsduk' a common word for all types of 'neckwear' or is it specific only for scarves and can't be used for others?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Halsduk in Swedish means just scarf for keeping the neck warm, not neckwear in general. Apparently галстук is a loan from German halstuch, I'm guessing the Swedish word is a loan too. Interesting how the meanings differ!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidsalval

I Searched for: hals: neck and duk: cloth... so neckcloth! An Easy way to learn three new words!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nvirjskly

This got me more than once. Grr.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamonAndre265865

Ok, blesings, jag har fyra halsduk och flera rokar.


[deactivated user]

    Is this sentence for real? xDD The horse is eating my scarf. WHEN will I have to say this?? LOL Well, I don't know Sweden, maybe this happens a lot there.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

    The beauty of language skills lies, I think, in the ability to express anything imaginable. And that's how I see it. :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissMuse

    Also, it's quite memorable, isn't it? :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seventwelve81

    You never know.. A goat started eating my shirt once (I was visiting a farm).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nvrslps

    Well we learned a few other animals a few lessons ago. You could replace hästen with hunden or katten. :)


    [deactivated user]

      Nah, I don't want anything to eat my scarf xD


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashakiran0

      i typed it wrong.... "the house is eating my scarf"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentGck

      I guess you could say that if you loose it a lot


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrxanadu

      As a Dutch person I love that it's called a "halsdoek" (which translate to English as "neck cloth"), which is what it literally is. By the way: the Dutch word for it is "sjaal" if anyone was wondering.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

      We have the word sjal in Swedish. It can be used for halsduk, but it's more often used for larger triangular or quadratic shawls than for long rectangular scarves, which are typically halsduk.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilipLean

      sjal shawl in English


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narglin

      and also "scialle" in italian


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alatarum

      And шаль in Russian that is also very close


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ksu_Coccinelle

      Yes! At least some words are similar across all these languages...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChoYume

      And châle in french ^^ they all have the same root! \o/


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudioDomazi

      And Xale in Portuguese (Similar pronunciation). It's AMAZING how languages are connected


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikLeh2

      In german its actually the other way around: the rectangular one is a Schal while the triangular one is often refered to as a Halstuch


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroRochaCTBA

      I saw a video where a swedish guy says "scarf" instead "halsduk". Is that normal?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

      Yes, we've borrowed the word scarf. Halsduk is however a broader term for kinds of neckwear for staying warm.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skeletonslunch

      Would it also include knitted cowls or shawls worn as scarves?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

      I suppose so, yes.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swede100

      they also use multiple other words in english there


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swede100

      That is one hungry horse!!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shenk97

      Couldn't this mean "ate", as in the Past-Tensive "The horse ate my scarf?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

      No, ate = åt in Swedish.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrMicroChem

      Then, "My dog ate my homework" is "Min hund åt min läxa", right?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

      It's really hard to say this in a truly idiomatic way in Swedish, for lots of reasons. Most importantly, you should probably have the particle verb åt upp (stress upp) here. Let's say Hunden åt upp min läxa, it's still not an unproblematic sentence, but I guess it will have to do.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrMicroChem

      Then, I better do my homework! Tack!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeoTubNinja

      One might even say, "The horse is scarfing down my scarf."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudioDomazi

      That was actually brilliant !


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_linguist

      Halsduk kinda reminds me of the word halsdoek from Dutch (it sounds the same). It's not actually a word but hals and doek are, if you put the together it means a cloth for your neck, or in other words a scarf. That's really cool.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beadurinc

      "The horse eats my scarf" doesn't really work in English, the better translation would be "the horse is eating my scarf".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Well, the better translation would not include homework at all since the horse is apparently eating a scarf, but "is eating" is the default translation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrMicroChem

      I think what happened here is that the original example about the horse eating a scarf got mixed up with my question about how to say "My dog ate my homework". "My dog ate my homework" is a kind of American cultural joke that refers to the ridiculous reasons that students give for not having their homework done when they arrive at school.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Quite possible. It's not actually an American joke, though - we have it in at least Sweden and Germany as well. :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrMicroChem

      Haha! International unity when it comes to slacking on homework & who's to blame.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beadurinc

      You're right about the scarf/homework thing, i've edited it now. :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koen990771

      In The Netherlands its also a cliché lmao


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Szasmine

      Ok I know you wouldnt expect a serious question in here but how can I know if this is "eats" or "is eating"? Or this is just random I dont get it


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Swedish doesn't make a difference, so it can translate to either depending on context.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CedSgm7N

      Reminds me of all those T.V. westerns where the cowboys wore bandanas around their necks.

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