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"La copa"

Translation:The glass

5 years ago

140 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/paddlecosta

is there any difference to "la copa" and "la taza"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
dunk999
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Then it seems that copa does not translate to cup.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

According to my Harper-Collins dictionary "copa" means: a glass (for desserts or drinks - so wineglass and goblet should work here); an alcoholic drink; the crown of a tree or hat; a trophy (such as La Copa del Mundo); a bra cup, plus "copas" = one of the suits in a Spanish card deck, represented by a goblet. Duo's stubborn insistence on "cup" as the only translation here is, at best, misleading.

Also see: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/copa

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Well it clearly didn't mis-lead you amble2lingo. Thank you for sharing your findings.

Actually, DL doesn't really stubbornly insist on anything. We get example sentences and phrases, and example translations. They prompt us to think about it, and get curious, and go and find out more elsewhere ... just as you have done. Then we share what we have discovered here. It works well for me. I only hope that my comments are sometimes as helpful as yours. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottsimons

"DL doesn't really insist on anything"... So why did it insist to not accept when i wrote "the drink" (and i know that's not exactly right), but when i came across a pairing exercise later in the same lesson, the only word they had to match "copa" was "drink"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

I've always entered "goblet" every time Duolingo gives copa because I refuse to translate it to "cup" lol. And the Mighty Owl has always accepted it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AidaBrown

Really? Narly,Its happened to me too honestly but,Its just so wierd

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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Not so. All three images are of cups, just different types.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
dunk999
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That's true, a cup is a beverage container, but it's nice to know when to use the various words. If someone says "a cup of wine", they might a funny look as a response. I guess asking for "una taza de vino" would get a funny look.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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Point taken. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
dunk999
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Well, I wouldn't call a wine glass a "cup".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I believe "copa" is cup as in sporting trophy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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Uncommon, I agree, though the definition of a "cup" refers to a container for the purpose of holding drinks, which all three of these items are used for.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

Copa del Rey (King's Cup) is the big football competition in Spain...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurel541478
laurel541478
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I've always thought of a cup as having a handle, along with a mug which would be largr r and heavier. And a glass of many sizes and shapes, but with no handle, and a goblet has a stem.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

kelly-rose- definition of a cup : a small bowl-shaped drinking vessel. So, una copa doesn't look at all like a cup.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

it is a small bowl shaped drinking vessel -- it happens to have a stem and a base attached for convenience :-)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morind91

what about like a plastic cup? where would that fall in here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

morin- vaso de plástico

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/huggzandkisses

why would this not be taza de plastico?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Copa - glass, cup (trophy)

Taza - cup, mug

Vaso - glass, tumbler, vase (not MX)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashtonmchale

I think it's because "taza" has a handle.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

Wondering the same thing. "Taza" has a handle. "Copa" is like a wine glass, and "vaso" means glass. No room for a plastic cup

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leogee101

vaso plastico (accent on the "a")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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We use taza and vaso here int the Philippines. :D But with different spelling, "tasa" and "baso".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theresegri

Me gusta esta explicación. Sobresaliente Kelly Rose. I agree fully and cannot understand why the teachers at Duolingo don't seem to grasp the difference between una taza y una copa.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

theresegri- Duo sees the difference, that's why they use taza for drinking coffee, vaso to drink milk, and copa to drink wine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I seem to detect a slight mis-understanding here, Therese. I don't see DL as a teaching program, more as a resource to help us learn.
We are presented with examples; often they seem less than satisfactory so we go and look for more information. For me, it's a much better system for learning than just being fed all the information without me having to think about it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liveandluv

Thank-you ! Kelly-Rose :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffBramlett

After seeing Kelly Ragsdale's explanation, I agree that 'copa' should be 'glass, not 'cup'. Only frat boys drink alcohol out of cups.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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Oops, I guess it's just a me thing then. I don't know where I picked up the habit, but I occasionally call even wine glasses cups.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffBramlett

I expect that a lot of the issue is due to locale. Different regions have different idioms. But hey, the more we expose, the more we all learn.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

very Shakespearian .. sharing a cup of wine.. :-)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomgreg2008

Gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taun5

Thanks, because I did not know the difference either

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GwumpiKat

Tysm your amazing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LawrenceHolder

Neat answer, thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julius_97

Gracias Kelly

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CuteCalicoCats

Thank you! I wonder why Duolingo doesn't tell you the difference?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chemisstre

So wine glass is a cup?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buttercup13132

Thank you so much that really helps

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharmaine31

Thank so much for this

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

copa is often related to wine, a copa de vino, and taza is related to a cup/mug of coffee.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aokoye
aokoye
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Copa is also used when referring to the World Cup (La Copa Mundial).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

In both cases, it is related to the shape of the cup. "copa" has a stem; "taza" usually has a handle on the side. I am not sure "handle" is the right word.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahTheEntwife

Interesting! In that case, I think "cup" might not be the best English translation...at least in my dialect, I'd never call something with a stem a "cup". That would be a glass.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Yes, it makes me think of a wine glass. One would never say let's have a cup of wine!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahTheEntwife

Yeah, I'd expect a "cup of wine" to be a unit of measurement in a recipe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liveandluv

I agree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeRocaRoja87

I agree for the purpose of duolingo this should not be a cup, however it is used in English in the same sense as Spanish when talking about trophies. The everyday use is more like a goblet or chalice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krembolle

Handle is correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twin0375

And a "cup" with a handle would be called a "mug" in English, right? Lol it's all so confusing

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bonnie860
Bonnie860
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A cup with a handle could be a mug or a teacup. A mug is usually larger (about 12 ounces, often) than a teacup (about 6--8 ounces often). A mug doesn't need a saucer, whereas a teacup does need a saucer. The shape of the cups are different, too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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stemware = las copas

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandiWL
BrandiWL
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Typically, it's referred to as a coffee cup (in America). You might say, "I'd like a cup of coffee." Mug is the same thing but is less used here. You might hear, "she gave me a Christmas mug filled with candy" here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
SandyBridgePlus
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Yes. Mug of beer, mug of rootbeer, etc. Maybe even a mug of cocoa. But it would feel slightly forced or ironic.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liveandluv

Yes, handle is the right word. Cup handle.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liveandluv

Yes, handle is correct. We say cup handle.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chunkylefunga

Copa is wine glass and also tankard glass. Taza is mug

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roy141977

I thought it was la taza for cup

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AidaBrown

Paddlecosta,I agree with you,but this isnt the first time.Remember Yes in spanish? Yes is known for two things in spanish,If and yes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j0.c
j0.c
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'una copa' also means an alcoholic drink informally, at least in Spain... 'tomar una copa', to have a drink. 'Salir de copas' to go out for drinks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ian.symons

Yes, it does. And that's what I wrote but Duolingo doesn't recognize it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachel_nm

Same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/owen861300

Same here!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl
alkajuglPlus
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In Colombia If we go our for unas copas after the show, it's not to admire the beautiful wine glasses!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahSalaz7

Still doesn't.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ben.black.
ben.black.
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Music and passion were always the fashion at the copa!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

If this is a recent photo of you, you are way too young to know that song! LOL Here's a lingot for the giggle.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deejbehling

I had to scroll down way too far to find this. Thank You!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Egdir
Egdir
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Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/owenms02
owenms02
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Should "The wine glass" be accepted?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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I think so.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theresegri

I agree. la copa = wine glass; la taza = the cup

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theresegri

Of course. Una copa = a wine glass not a cup (meaning a cup of tea).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ccedroni

That might be like saying "Give me a mug of wine" I kinda think of "Copa" like "Goblet", except nobody says "Goblet" in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

A wine glass has the shape of a goblet. And English speakers used to drink wine out of goblets. Basically there was a time when drinking cups were often not made out of glass. In fact, even today, you can have a metal goblet in the exact same shape as a glass and use it for the exact same purpose. If it looks like a wine glass made out of metal or wood, then it is a goblet. This usage obviously remained in use in Spanish culture, hence "copa" still means wine glass, goblet, trophy, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeSalter

Well, I said cop and they thought I misspelled cup and accepted it... So hopefully wine glass is accepted too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHill0

Just want to mention how USEFUL these discussion are to me! Just can't get that with other programs! Thank you DL.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
SandyBridgePlus
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Agreed. I often spend more time reading comments than doing the courses. It really helps clarify things!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/txlucky1

I would say that copa is our stemware like a wine glass.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaviOnline

Copa del Rey = The King's Cup :) Love it when I am able to read Spanish on TV!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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Copa del Mundo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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This is the only type of usage of this word for "cup" i know. All over Spain it means a wine glass (other glasses, juice, beer, etc, no stem) is vaso.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahSalaz7

No one has mentioned it, but when I was in Venezuela, copa was sometimes used to refer to a drink of any alcoholic beverage rather than the vessel in which it was served. Is this usage found in other countries as well?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dleehii

Based off the flirting lesson, I thought copa was drink and not glass/cup.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Yes, "copa" can also mean an alcoholic drink.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yinyangrunner

I will report this definition. 09/24/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redfishacs

Still does not accept drink 09/24/2017. DL even had "drink" matching "copa" just 3 questions ago and that's why I put that instead of cup. ????

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fillmoe
Fillmoe
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This brings back such memories. My first trip to Latin America (Peru) 2008. My first full Spanish sentence: "Una copa de vino tinto, por favor."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I take it that it was uphill from there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OmniGlot2000

Copa is also used for trophies...like copa del rey...the kings cup..football? Am I right

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Yes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George418878
George418878
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La Copa América!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobafett131
bobafett131
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Harry Potter y la Copa de Fuego

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bob689

"Copacabana (At The Copa)"

Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl With yellow feathers in her hair and a dress cut down to there She would merengue and do the cha-cha And while she tried to be a star Tony always tended bar Across the crowded floor, they worked from 8 til 4 They were young and they had each other Who could ask for more?

[Chorus:] At the copa (CO!) Copacabana (Copacabana) The hottest spot north of Havana (here) At the copa (CO!) Copacabana Music and passion were always in fashion At the copa.... they fell in love

His name was Rico He wore a diamond He was escorted to his chair, he saw Lola dancing there And when she finished,he called her over But Rico went a bit to far Tony sailed across the bar And then the punches flew and chairs were smashed in two There was blood and a single gun shot But just who shot who?

[Chorus]

At the copa... she lost her love

Her name is Lola, she was a showgirl, But that was 30 years ago, when they used to have a show Now it's a disco, but not for Lola, Still in dress she used to wear, Faded feathers in her hair She sits there so refined,and drinks herself half-blind She lost her youth and she lost her Tony Now she's lost her mind

[Chorus]

At the copa... don't fall in love Don't fall in love

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akotchon

How many stinking words do we get for cup? Copa, taza, vasos...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Ha! I found 12 stinking words for cup just in English:
cup, beaker, chalice, goblet, tankard, mug, quaich, horn, stoup, stein. noggin, rummer. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

This word is frequently used for glass in Spain. Una copa de vino is more commonly used than un vaso de vino. Although if you say the latter, they will understand you...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertMenk

On one of the matching exercises they matched "copa" and "drink", which i didnt think was right, but they were the last two words so it had to be right. So naturally i write "the drink" here and i get it wrong. I know it means cup, but i wanted to seeif they take drink too. They need some consistency on this program.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeRocaRoja87

I understand the difference between la copa and la taza but is there a different word in Spanish for a cup or a mug? In England a (tea)cup is usually smaller and a mug is larger.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JJalilvand

Another correct answer : the wine glass

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/briannaeason

...copa caBAna!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobPage1

At the copa ... copa caBAna the hottest spot north of Atlanta.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

Is there a difference in a teacup (a cup and saucer) and a coffee cup (a mug)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kowpatty

It has become quite clean I will NEVER speak this language with any proficiency.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Take heart, kowpatty! It is quite cleaR that you WILL learn Spanish if you keep at it! You will make mistakes - and learn. You will be confused and read these discussions - and learn. You will look things up - and learn. Then, one day, things will start to click into place. And, voila! You'll be speaking Spanish!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Kind thoughts and encouragement go a long way. Good for you amble. Don't give up kowpatty. 18 months ago I could barely say "Buenos días"!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RubyGeorge28

Goblet...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlaviadeLu3

Well, I got this right only because there wasn't 'la taza' in the options. Aaand thinking of 'The Cup' as a trophy-cup. (Heard abt it a lot :) )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AM3GA

La copa sopa

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwood611
mwood611
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Man, what a hard word to learn

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orenkassne

I would translate it as mostly a trophy - like the world series cup (which is actually a trophy shaped like a goblet or a cup)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amalianuni

I thought copa meant copy and got it wrong

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/williamhawk

la taza means cup not la copa

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IOztFsa9

I thought 'taza' meant cup, can someone explain?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sher881

Think - copa is used at the Copacabana

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura337709

La Copa de la Vida was how I learned this word, 1998 World Cup.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolfieEve

Shouldn't this be "la taza", not "la copa" since the sentence here is the cup, wich is a "taza"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KwameKN
KwameKN
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Is it sopose to be la taza or la copa

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Riverocks452

Duolingo insisted that copa meant drink in a vocabulary matching exercise not even five minutes ago. Now, that is apparently the incorrect definition. I thought it meant cup, accepted it could be used coloquially to mean a drink, (like the English 'i had a glass' to mean the act of drinking) and I am now thoroughly confused.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertMenk

Lol just posted the same exact thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

No, you're learning Spanish! "copa" has all those meanings and more. Just step back from Duo every now and then to get a better sense of proportion. The program is really excellent in some ways, as I'm sure you know, but still a bit rough in other ways. You can often gain more clarity and fill in a lot of gaps by reading these discussions and paying attention to the exchanges.

The one thing I would add at this point is that "copa" means cup, but more appropriately for trophy cups and bra cups rather than coffee or tea cups. The latter kind of cup is "taza." Other than that, I think you've got it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/404consultant

It introduced la copa as the wine glass or glass and when I used it later for an answer it only allowed cup, glass, or goblet.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura337709

Thank you Ricky Martin, learned a lot of Spanish words while listening to his songs ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam198671
Sam198671
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The drink should work.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snoblitt

The wine glass is correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tammi449302

What would you call a measuring cup?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I don't think there's a standard word, but you could say "una taza medidora."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffster0

Am I the only one that heard "Ya copa" with new male voice?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Denko9

Can it be translated as "the drink"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Only in a context where the drinking vessel is being used to mean what it typically contains. English speakers use glass the same way, "I'd like another glass (of wine), please." You wouldn't translate the word glass as wine without that context, however.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rodrigox96
rodrigox96
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La Copa del Mundo

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ella225141

How do you share lingots with someone?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lyn501852

Shouldn't La Copa be translated as The Cup? That's what Tiny Cards says.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

Isn't "copa" also slang in some regions for "a quick glass of wine" with a companion?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alxzien
Alxzien
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This is misleading. Vaso means glass, cup or not. Copa means glass as in a wine glass or goblet.

5 months ago