"You have to ask me for it."

Translation:Tú me lo tienes que pedir.

5 years ago

101 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dehaneysteven

In cases like this, how do I determine whether 'lo' or 'me' comes first? Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

The RID rule. You can have up to three object pronouns in a sentence, and the order is always Reflexive - Indirect - Direct. Check this site for more information http://spanishlearningcentreblackpool.blogspot.com/2012/01/rid-order-when-you-have-two-object.html

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielinform

I wrote:

"Usted tiene me pedirla."

Would that translate roughly as, "You have ask me for it" ?

(Instead of, "You have to ask me for it.")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

Not really, you need to remember that the clitics "me/la" need to be together, either before the conjugated verb or attached to a gerund or infinitive. Also "usted tiene" means "you have" and "usted tiene que" means "you have to". Now, your sentence "You have asked me for it" (this is what you meant, right?) is present perfect tense, Spanish normally uses the verb "haber" instead of "tener" in that situation, so that sentence would be better translated as "usted me la ha pedido". If you have any other questions just let me know.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1Plus
  • 25
  • 23
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 551

I can't reply to your question a level down. A gerund, in English, is a verb form ending in -ing that operates like a noun. For instance "Swimming is so much fun!". You can't do that in Spanish. You can say "To swim is so much fun!" (Nadar es muy divertido!).

El gerundio in spanish (since it can't be a noun, it's just a verb with the -ando or -iendo ending, used in an imperfect tense ("jugar/jugando"; "comer/comiendo").

I am swimming. Estoy nadando.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

I understand what you are saying elissaf1. I just have a couple of clarifications.
A gerund isn't a verb form; it is a noun. Sure enough, it is derived from a verb but it is just another noun. The "verb form" ending -ing is a Present Participle.
In Spanish, el gerundio (ending -ando or -endo) is also called Participio Presente. It is used in the Presente Progressivo (or Continuo) tense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

Thank you elissaf1. Since I posted that question I have done my own research and come to a similar conclusion, what rogercchristie said is correct though, gerunds are in fact nouns and not verbs.

I would like to add a bit more to your comment, when you say in Spanish "¡nadar es muy divertido!", the infinitive verb (nadar) is what we call a "verbo sustantivado", meaning that it is being treated as a noun, you can even add an article to it if you wish, as in "¡el nadar es muy divertido!". I'm not certain of the gender of that article, but I think it might be neuter (just like lo). Also, on the Spanish gerundio, it can be used for the present progressive tense, but it can also be used as an adverb, for example:

  • Vine corriendo (Corriendo modifies the verb venir).

And two of them can be used as predicative adjectives (hirviendo, ardiendo).

  • Aceite hirviendo (boiling oil).
  • Café ardiendo (scalding coffee).

As for what rogercchristie said about the gerundio being called participio presente, I think that is wrong, the participio presente (also known as participio de presente or participio activo) is being slowly replaced in modern Spanish by the gerundio, even though there is a slight difference in meaning. for example:

  • Trabajan ignorantes de la que se les viene encima.
  • Trabajan ignorando la que se les viene encima.

The Spanish present participles have the ending -nte and nowadays are only used as adjectives or nouns, for example:

  • Estudiante (Noun).
  • Asistente (Noun).
  • Ayudante (Noun).
  • Concursante (Noun).
  • Arrogante (Adjective).
  • Resplandeciente (Adjective).
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

That seems very clear to me. Thanks alezzzix.
Just one important error: "gerund" should be "present participle" or "gerundio". There is no gerund in Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

2 March 2016 There is an annoying tendency for these comments to get mixed up and thereby make it difficult to follow the discussion; we should all date them.

I hope you can see where this fits in. I am responding to alezzzix's comment about a week ago: "…what rogercchristie said about the gerundio being called participio presente, I think that is wrong…".

I'm still very much learning the basics in Spanish. Your comments and help are much appreciated.
Please be patient with me as I have also been reading up on Italian pronouns, and as a consequence I'm sure I am still suffering from mild concussion! :-)

I wouldn't have considered the Spanish -ante -ente etc words as participles, only as nouns and adjectives. Have I missed something here?

I understand that gerundio is also called participio presente. It has much the same function as the present participle in English, except it is an adverb. The gerundio is used in the progressive tenses (eg presente progressivo or presente continuo). I also understand that a gerundio can be used as an adverb, and in reflexive forms, interrogative forms, negative forms, conditional forms, commands, and so on.

What I am certain about is that there is no equivalent to gerund in Spanish. You can not create a noun from a Spanish verb by adding an -ando/-endo ending. In Spanish, the only verb form that can act as a noun is the infinitive (eg El caminar es divertido). Some grammar websites and otherwise reliable dictionaries translate gerundio into gerund. It is not only mis-leading, it is WRONG! (This widespread confusion is the main reason why I prefer the term "participio presente" rather than "gerundio".)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

A lot of people keep saying that to me, but I can't quite wrap my head around it, could you explain?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RositaLW

Usted tiene QUE pedírmelo. - > You have to ask me for it.

tiene que = have TO

pedir = ask FOR - - - - + me + lo

[compare with BUSCAR = to search FOR ; to seek.]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
  • 25
  • 10
  • 1400

Pedírmelo and you need que in there.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lalauras

but isn't "me" the direct object? I didn't think "pedir" was a reflexive verb. Or am I wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

In the English sentence yes, in the Spanish one is indirect, the direct object is lo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisDurfee

Thanks, Alezzzix! That helps!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eldylan3

The link says that 2 is the maximum amount of pronouns though...

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustine2017
Augustine2017
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 577

That is the maximum number of object pronouns. It doesn't count the subject pronoun "tú".
The pronoun subject is mostly dropped in Spanish. I think it would be more common to say : Tienes que pedírmelo.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluharty13

I wondered the same thing. I said "lo me" rather than "me lo." Someone please illuminate us.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

The way I learned this is through a memory device: "People before things" (in my mind, people are more important than things). Therefore, the indirect object (usually the person) goes before the direct object (usually a thing). That said, this isn't the easiest sentence to learn with because you have the subject as a pronoun, too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 964

I never learned it that way (or perhaps I have forgotten it), but it is very helpful for understanding the order of indirect object and direct object pronouns in a sentence. People before things. Very good!!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisDurfee

This is also my question, Dehaneysteven.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacqueline702154

Why did you start the sentence with vos

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

This sentence reminds me of an algebra equation!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SistaSlim

I put "Tú me tienes que pedirlo".. What's wrong with putting "lo" at the end of pedir? I thought I could do that

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deborah878229

As noted above, if you have two pronouns in a sentence with an infinitive, you can either have them both precede the infinitive or both attached to the end of the infinitive. And the order is always RID...Reflexive, Indirect, Direct. You never separate the pronouns more than by one space.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mitchusero
Mitchusero
  • 25
  • 12
  • 11
  • 14

So it would be "pedirmelo"?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aly.vidal11

Usted tiene que pedirmelo.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

Tienes que pedirmelo. Was suggested as the correct answer by DL. Can you pedirmelo? I had no idea you could stick the two of them on the end of an infinive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RositaLW

Yes. It's quite common. But remember to put an accent on the last syllable of the verb when it has TWO add ons after it.. The ear needs to hear the accent to know it is an infinitive verb.

The rule is to accent the penultimate syllable UNLESS the word ends in a vowel that is not N or S.
So that means that infinitive verbs, which end in R have their last syllable accented.
BUT, if you add pronouns after it you may lose this natural accent.

Examples:
pedir - - no written accent because the rule provides an accent on the "i" before the R.

perdirme -- no written accent because the rules provide an accent on the "i" as the penultimate syllable.

pedírmelo - - the "i" is accented because the rule would make the "e" of "me" accented and then your ear would not realize that it was a tack on to the verb.

You can also use pedírtelas and pedïrselos and pedírmenos - and all the other possibilities. You can also add the same things (me, te, se, lo, la, los, nos, etc) at the end of the gerund.

comer - to eat. comiendo - eating; está comiendo -(he/she is eating)

está comiéndolo (he/she is eating it) Note where the accent mark goes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

No-one answered your question. I guess you've found out by now, but for anyone else:
I understand the answer is yes. See the string starting with Dr.Beez below.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RositaLW

http://spanishnotebook.com/doubleobjectpronouns.html

This is the clearest and most comprehensive article I could find on pronouns and when, how and in what order they can be attached to which verb forms.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReeceRJD

I read in the 'Collins easy learning spanish book' that if it is an instruction to do something, the pronouns go at the end "Tú tienes que pedírmelo"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanitaJacobs

Why not "tu me lo debes pedir?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RositaLW

That translates as:
(Literally) You, to me it MUST ask for.
(Normal English) You MUST ask me for it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustine2017
Augustine2017
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 577

you have to = you must
Must may seem stronger, but they essentially mean the same thing.

"I have things to do." (no obligation impied) is quite different from "I really have to do this" (obligation impoied). The latter example can be stated, "I really must do this."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliT.Firef
AliT.Firef
  • 22
  • 20
  • 17
  • 129

Asking here because there seems to be a knowledegable person who may reply. My effort was 'Tienes que me lo pedir', which as far as order of pronouns goes seems to be right, but DL didn't accept it (Corrected it to 'Tienes que pedir'!!Most unsatisfactory!). Is it possble to put the pronouns there?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustine2017
Augustine2017
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 577

Was waiting to see if a native speaker would chime in. I would say that this is not typical word order, to put the pronouns there, and I could not find any examples or rule to support that word order. From my experience, usual would be:
Me lo tienes que pedir.
or
Tienes que pedírmelo.
It seems like tener que shouldn't be separated from the infinitive.

If you'd like another opinion, especially from a native speaker, and nothing turns up here, you could try posting your question on the Spanish Discussions page.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlchism

Why not "Lo tienes que pedirme"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

As caiser already said, the pronouns (me/lo) cannot be separated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nestnebula1

i dont know how these reflexive verbs work, but i think they can be written in more than one way

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Opanner
Opanner
  • 22
  • 185

Duo gives "Tu tienes que pedir" as a correct answer. Where is the "it"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

"Tú tienes que pedir" would indeed be wrong; there is no "it" and no "me". You should certainly report the error.
However, the translation at the top of this page is currently "Tú me lo tienes que pedir" so it seems DL isn't altogether wrong.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LFCAlex

You me it you have to ask for.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill289935
Bill289935
  • 25
  • 18
  • 107

Just finding this such a monumental struggle as I simply dont know what reflexive/indirect/direct pronouns are in English

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

It is very difficult to explain how languages work without using the vocabulary of grammar. I do appreciate that that makes it difficult if you haven't done much grammar before.

I suggest you find some good grammar websites and start from the beginning --- "A verb is blah, blah, blah", "A noun is etc etc", even if you already know some of it. Even if you do already have some basic grammar it will be time well invested. And it doesn't take long to skim through the basics when you already have some knowledge (which you clearly do).

I started learning Spanish and revising my rusty old French four years ago. Even though I had studied English grammar (and Latin and French - albeit numerous years ago!), my confidence that I knew it all already was sadly misplaced. It wasn't long before I was checking my understanding and finding several large holes! And four years on, I still check the grammar websites regularly. It is a lot easier now I know my way around them.

I dare say I could recommend some good grammar websites, but I suggest you start like I did. Google "English grammar" and see what it throws up. You will soon learn how to spot the rubbish ones and build up a favourites list for the ones worth going back to. (PS: other search engines are available!)

One final comment (for now). I very quickly got over that feeling of embarrassment (that was only in my own head!) of having to face up to my ignorance. And now only you, me and several thousand Duolingo students know about it, so that's all right then! :-)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustine2017
Augustine2017
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 577

You can also simply start by googling "What is a reflexive verb?" or "What is a reflexive pronoun?". There is also a book called English Grammar for Students of Spanish. It explains all of the grammatical terms with examples in English and Spanish.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201
Iris150201
  • 25
  • 18
  • 312

This is odd. Although I got the answer wrong for a legitimate reason, I don't understand the correction..."Tú tienes que pedir." With this correction, how can one interpret the sentence correctly? There is no "me" nor "lo."

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

You are right. DL has made an error. Report it if you can.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201
Iris150201
  • 25
  • 18
  • 312

I feel a teensy bit smarter, rogerchristie. Mucho gracias..

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 964

OK. I wondered about that, but I took a chance. Thanks for the info. Makes sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k-kayak

Why was 'Tienes que me lo pedir?' wrong? I thought DO and IO pronouns should precede the verb (and helper verbs) that they are describing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertGenta

why can't you use preguntar?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

To ask means preguntar, to ask for means pedir

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertGenta

graciassss

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnycc

Would this be the same way to translate "You have to order it for me"? This seemed an ambiguous sentence in Spanish, do you just need to be aware of context to know which translation is correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 14

No, "you have to order it for me" would be better translated as "tienes que pedirlo por/para mí".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnycc

Thanks, makes sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronLowry2

Why is the 'Tu' necessary in the beginning of the sentence? I thought the 'tienes' was sufficient to define the subject of the sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PedroDBerr

i put tienes que pedirmelo, and it was wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ipols
ipols
  • 20
  • 9
  • 9
  • 2

It says 'tenés que pedírmelo'. Which form is tenés and why do you have to use it here? I've never seen it before...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

"vos" is an archaic word for "you" (equivalent to the English "ye") which is still used in Central and Latin America. (See http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=vos)
So "vos tenés" is "you have". (See http://www.wordreference.com/conj/EsVerbs.aspx?v=tener)

We don't have to use it here. We could also translate "you have" to "tú tienes", "usted tiene", "vosotros tenéis", or "ustedes tienen".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ron.seymour

You all will have to excuse me if I have missed a key point in this discusion but I wrote 'tú tienes que pedírmelo' Can anyone comment on that please?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

The "tú" is not essential but it is not wrong; "tienes" already means you have (and nothing else), but the "tú" can be used for emphasis.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mia426738

The form "tienes" already implies that it refers to "tú". Why does Duo say the sentence is wrong without "tú"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hobbymueller
hobbymueller
  • 21
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 388

wouldn't "lo tienes que pedirme" work too?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

This has been answered so many times already. Don't split the pronouns.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tristan_Fairhair
Tristan_Fairhair
  • 23
  • 21
  • 19
  • 12
  • 495

Why wasn't "debes pedírmelo" accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

I understand "Debes pedírmelo" means "You must ask me for it".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ron.seymour

I opted for ' tú tienes que pedirmelo' but Duo did not agree. Seguramente esto es correcto.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzannia

I answered that as well, and Duo said it was correct, por supuesto. maybe you had a typo?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrisDurfee

How does one know when to use "debo"? It seemed to me that this sentence qualifies.....right?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Geoffr18

Debe de pedir was the answer Duolingo gave me!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carlos__Morais
Carlos__Morais
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 11
  • 281

What's wrong with "Tu tienes que me lo pedir"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

"me lo" before the conjugated verb or "-melo" after the infinitive.

So either "Tú me lo tienes que pedir" or "Tú tienes que perdírmelo".

Note: there are also several other Spanish translations of the English sentence. Read the other comments.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlokken
tlokken
  • 25
  • 6
  • 2
  • 9

Why do I need Lo here?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fabian_hh
fabian_hh
  • 22
  • 14
  • 11
  • 224

Because it does not say: You have to ask me. 'for it' is represented through 'lo' in this case

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlie6361

Usted vs tu ? Why cant they be interchangeable?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

Either usted or tú is OK but you have to change the conjugated verb as well.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Galinuo
Galinuo
  • 19
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 2

Would "tienes que lo pedirme" work?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoonhaHwan1

Tú me tienes que pedirlo. Can someone explain why this is not correct? I am confused because 'tengo que pedirlo' is correct no?

Thanks!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

Don't split up the pronouns.

"me lo" before the conjugated verb or "-melo" after the infinitive.

So either "Tú me lo tienes que pedir" or "Tú tienes que perdírmelo".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JavaGP
JavaGP
  • 18
  • 14

I said, "Tú me lo debes pedir", but it was marked wrong. Why isn't this acceptable?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

Tú me lo debes pedir - You should ask me for it

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barbara610959

tienes que preguntarme is prefectly correct and should be accepted

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grawl71
Grawl71
  • 17
  • 15
  • 122

Why is Tú tienes que pedirmelo wrong?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

I have answered this before, but with 112 comments and counting you may have missed it.

The "tú" is not essential but it is not wrong; "tienes" already means you have (and nothing else), but the "tú" can be used for emphasis.

I'm sure DL has accepted it before, so maybe you made a typo. If you are sure it was as you wrote it here and it was still refused by DL then report the error.

Incidentally, it should be "pedírmelo" (with an accent over the "i"), but DL usually just warns about misplaced accents so shouldn't have marked the whole answer wrong for that.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acmeres
acmeres
  • 25
  • 104

Why can I not use "Tu me tienes que pedirlo."?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 24
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 304

Already answered ten times here. Please read the other comments.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barbara610959

You have, so far, given 2 different answers to the above question. The one on your webpage says "Tienes que ordenar " . It is different from the one shown above in Spanish. My answer, which you marked as incorrect was "Tienes que preguntarme" You really need to get your answers together because there are many ways to translate words.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

Why is it in that order ie you me, it, have, for, to ask

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robgprice
Robgprice
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 3

Usted tienes que pedirmelo?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustine2017
Augustine2017
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 577

Tu tienes ...
Usted tiene ....
él tiene ...
ellos tienen ...
Ustedes tienen ...
etc.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/autumnnikkole512

So when I lived in Mexico we said "Tienes que pedirmelo" or attached the other articles to the verb. Is this acceptable grammatically?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/verengan

Is there a reason that 'Tienes que pedírmelo' isn't accepted.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elmaestrop4l

Vos? Why?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithProud

I am having a little trouble with this one. Can someone tell me why "tienes que lo preguntarme" would not work here?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augustine2017
Augustine2017
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 577

You have two problems in this sentence.
First, as others have pointed out here, you can't separate me and lo. They are objects of the same verb : ask (for) it; ask me.
So, your choices are :
Me lo tienes que pedir.
or
Tienes que pedirmelo.

The second problem with your answer is the use of the verb "preguntar". Preguntar is used when you are asking a question. Pedir is used when you want to ask "for" something.

I hope this helps. If the difference between the two verbs is still fuzzy, you can try googling "preguntar vs. pedir". Here is one web site with explanation and examples, including audio and translations : https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/pedir-vs-preguntar-in-spanish

2 months ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.