"Precis!"

Translation:Exactly!

December 4, 2014

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aeonpunk

One of my professors claims that saying "Precis!" is the quickest way to sound like you're actually from Sweden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sustained

Svenska 101: Precis, absolut, perfekt, korrekt!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

As an exchange student to Sweden, I remember my host mother saying, "Absolut inte!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jwbards

Then the next word out of my mouth would be a dead giveaway. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FLchick

Then imagine Swedish spoken in a USA Deep South accent, y'all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaddatzK

Kudos for making me think about my aunt from Frankfurt, DE who lives in Texas. She frequently combines German and Southern English like that (Eg: Wie gehts, y'all?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elspeth425691

I heard this a lot when I lived in Sweden, this word alone transpots me back.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ah13d

They use this a lot in Sweden! Along with 'absolut'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friswing

And "Just precis!" is just as common for 'Exactly', really emphasizing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thaurin

And 'Precis det!' :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friswing

'Precis det!' sounds like something we could say, when pointing at something, pointing out that "Precis DET" (demonstrative pronoun) is the item you are talking about. But when we say "Absolut!" or "Just precis!" it is an emphatic way of saying that we agree with what the former speaker just said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thaurin

Okay, thanks. Maybe I was thinking of "Just det!" Can that work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friswing

Yes, absolutely! :-) "Just det!" is affirmative in the same way as 'Precis!'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjodni

Could this also mean precise?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exqeriment

Are they related somehow?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Altomar_

Maybe like in "precisely"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marinamatt26

I wonder what is the historical explanation for all those latin-like words in the swede language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friswing

Latin was the 'lingua franca' all through Europe in the Middle Ages and onwards. Latin-like loanwords seems to be pretty much the same in all west European languages. Even if the words are not direct loans from Latin, they seems to have been mediated pretty much unchanged through English, French, German. --- I have the feeling that the more 'educated', intellectual, vocabulary we use, the easier to understand, since Europe has a joint educational history at large


[deactivated user]

    Exactly! The more isolated Icelandic, on the other hand, won't allow almost any loan words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexMoby

    Actually, it's the same expression in Dutch: Precies !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoyunmyoun

    in French, précisément?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

    And, "precisamente", Brazilian portuguese.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Q_C

    Precisely is accepted here but how close a translation is it? Is it okay to use precisely all the time instead of exactly?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    Usually both work, though imho exactly is a little closer in meaning in many cases.

    In some sentences, neither works. An example from the internet: One of the merits of the report is precisely that it avoids doing this. Unless you rewrite this sentence pretty heavily, this precisely should be translated as just.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/korygiles

    Precis probably means Precise, doesn't it? That's how I'm going to remember it, because precise means exact.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    It can be an adjective, but it's usually an adverb, so it's better to think of precisely instead.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CadklZ

    Difference between noga, noggrann, precis and exakt? Im using a swedish dictionary and i cant tell which are tye precise meanings and the synonyms. Basically... For the Swedish half: Noga=Precise Noggrann=Precise/Accurate Precis=Exact/Exactly/Precise

    For the English half: Exact=Exakt Exactly=Exakt Precise=Precis/Nogra/Noggrann

    Could anybody please clear this up as to which are synonyms and which are direct translations? Its all so confusing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

    noga and noggrann mean 'careful', and only noga is used in the expression Det är inte så noga 'It doesn't matter that much'.
    exakt and precis are pretty much the same thing in most cases but precis can have a temporal meaning which exakt cannot, e.g. Vi kom precis hit 'We just got here'.

    Also when you say 'Not exactly' in English, that is Inte precis in Swedish – inte exakt is not used in this sense, it only means literally 'not exactly' as in 'not exactly 3, but 3.024'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CadklZ

    I see, I will revisit this when I'm less tired and can understand better but thank you very much.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myriam365

    I heard someone in an movie using 'precis' as a 'ja'('yes'), when he was answering a question. Is it OK?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sustained

    Depends on the question, I think.

    Just as "exactly" or "precisely" wouldn't always work as a response to a question in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myriam365

    I know what you mean. Thank you. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetraTorne

    I'm sure that's what I wrote?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hjtunfgb

    Shouldn't the stress be on the last syllable? Like, /pɾɛˈsís/?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friswing

    When being emphatic, yes. But if not so emphatic, the stress can be rather 'flat' and comparable in both syllables.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanieA567674

    Would "precisely" be accepted? I put "exactly," but just curious for future exercises.

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