"Olá vô!"

Translation:Hello grandfather!

July 10, 2013

31 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dtturman

Didn't they just say that grandfather is o avo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes... grandfather = avô, grandpa= vô, vovô


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dtturman

And grandma is also vo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Grandmother = avó, grandma = vó, vovó.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natureofreality

maybe it would be a good idea for words like these to have an exercise where they are directly compared to eachother


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DREDWARD

GREAT IDEA :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dtturman

grandma and grandpa both sound the same....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

The accents on the letters show the distinction: ô - closed sound (like O in fOam) / ó - open sound (like O in hOt)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrodrigo99

I call my grandfather vô and my grandmother vó. The difference is the accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyMar1923

My grandparents were Azorean Portuguese. Both were called Avo - the only difference was the pronunciation of the "o." Very subtle difference. Grandmother was more of an "A vah" Will be a challenge to hear the difference here. When I visited the Azores this last summer, some words (like não) were pronounced differently from one island to another. Obrigada.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FoghornJLeghorn

We have a large number of Azoreans on my islands in the US they came fleeing the dictatorship, lots of them are fishermen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

The distinction is between "avó" (grandmother), which has an open O (the o in monster, force, loss, Colin) and "avô" (grandfather), which has a closed O (imagine a Scottish person uttering the words go, no, ...).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ragnhildr49

I am a Scot, and the "o" in "force" is the same as in "go" or "no" to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aidx767

If the wikipedia page on Scottish English (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_English) reflects your speech, then the 'ô' in 'avô' will be pronounced rather like the vowel in 'toe' (in IPA, /o/), while the 'ó' in 'avó' will be pronounced like the vowel in 'paw' (in IPA, /ɔ/)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/papascissors

Minha esposa é brasileira e ela não entendeu essa mulher...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

The voice is certainly not the best, but at least you don't personally need it to hear a Brazilian accent :) That was a flawless Portuguese sentence, by the way!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkvaldez

Whats wrong with gramps?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaered

There were kids on his lawn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nvrslps

Nothing, it's just that Duo doesn't recognize all synonyms. You can report it and they might add it to the accepted answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derobins

With the muddy text-to-speech pronunciation, it's impossible to tell the difference between "Olá, avô!" and the slangy, not-well-introduced, "Olá, vô!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ameiaa

How can we distinguish grandmother from grandfather aurally?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Vó (grandmother) = /vooh/ (o like in hot) // vô (grandfather) = /vo/ (a more closed and nasal sound)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WesleyAlcoforado

I don't think it's nasal. It's just closed, like in foam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

I see your point.... when we take other vowels (like ã, õe) we clearly see a more nasal sound. And when we compare to French sometimes it seems like there is no nasal sound. However, some linguistics are used to saying that this ô has a slight nasal sound ( http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1750334). Thanks for posting foam. That helped ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ameiaa

thanks for all that info!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ayase-chan

It's not nasal sound, is closed but don't is nasal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ringcycle

This is a little misleading, because in American English (in most regions, maybe not all of them), the o in hot is pronounced like the a in the Spanish word casa. Like ahhhh. A better example would be the English words raw or paw. The a's in those words sound very close to the o in avó.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria696768

Lamento mas Vô é grandpa grandfather é Avô.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adel380957

Yes I agree with these comments. How could "avô " not be satisfactory for an abbreviation of the word ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tilmann703439

So, if I write "Olá vó" why does it tell me correct and says "Hallo grandfather"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorenaMGB

I'm brazilian and most brazilian people say meu avô and minha avó, and not meu vô and minha vó. Few people speaks like this. I can say they when we speak fast, it seems thar we don't speak the A, but it's not true. Vou ao cinema com minha avó seams "vou au cinema com minhavó"; "vou au cinema com meu avô. There are two words we use as vocative: vovô and vovó, as gran and granny

Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.