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"I have never said I do not like your yard."

Translation:Nunca he dicho que no me gusta tu jardín.

5 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/game-biz
game-biz
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I placed nunca after dicho in the sentence like, "No he dicho nunca que no me gusta tu jardín." Duolingo said it was wrong, but I'm wondering if there is rule about where to place nunca, or if what I wrote is fine.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenniferlp
jenniferlp
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I have just looked this up, and it appears that adverbs of negation (such as "no" and "nunca") appear before the word they negate. However, "nunca" can go after the verb if you're using a double negative like "Él no come nunca" (http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/neg.htm), but in this sentence the adverb has to go before the verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryTravels

"The negative words can also be used with the word "no," following the verb. Note that unlike English, double negatives are acceptable in Spanish.

No habla nadie. Nobody speaks."

I think Duolingo is incorrect here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaleFavier
DaleFavier
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That was what I tried too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I think your version is fine. However, I'd probably translate each of them slightly differently if I were being exceptionally picky:

  • I have never said that I don't like your yard = Nunca ha dicho que no me gusta su patio.

  • I haven't ever said that I don't like your yard = No ha dicho nunca que no me gusta su patio.

The first seem slightly more emphatic to me, but both mean more or less the same thing.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertFairless

jardin=garden; corral=yard. Corral was marked as incorrect but I disagree. Pero no es importante porque nosotros debemos de aceptar que DL hace errores

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Although I do accept that Duolingo makes errors (don't we all?), it's important to report errors or words that should be accepted because it improves the application for all of us.

I put patio and they accepted it. As I'm sure that you already know, yard and garden are used interchangeably in some English dialects, so the translation yard = jardín is correct. However, you can report "corral" if you feel it should be accepted also. I do it all the time.

Wordreference lists the translation of corral (livestock enclosure) as corral.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=corral

However, you may have a sound argument for corral since it means "A piece of uncultivated ground adjoining a building, typically one enclosed by walls or other buildings." (British) according to the OED. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/yard

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/werrenskis

I thought a double negative is ok in Spanish!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

it is, if you do it, and everything else, correctly ;)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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It is okay. If you put nunca after the verb, then you have to add "no" before the verb.(No he dicho nunca) If you put a negative word before the verb, then no isn't necessary. (Nunca he dicho)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SrHMcQ
SrHMcQ
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Though I know that "jardin" can be used here, I have consistently used "cesped" for "yard" without trouble...?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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As far as i know "césped" i= lawn/grass. And "jardin" = garden/yard/patio. These are the terms used in Mexico. Not sure about other Spanish speaking countries.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johnboyo

Cesped is lawn

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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In real life, that's probably fine if someone's yard consists of only grass. If not, the Spanish speaking person will likely be able to guess what you mean in most cases.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pannychis

will it hurt to include a that in that sentence or it's not legit

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenniferlp
jenniferlp
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I think using "that" would be OK too. In this case, not using "that" makes it more like a quote (or the denial of having said whatever is being quoted)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanaGraham
SeanaGraham
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I used que and it was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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You can often drop the "that" in English but Duolingo frequently doesn't accept that when it should.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhoman

Why doesn't huerta work here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DJdeRidder

Shouldn't "decir que" require the subjunctive to be used in the second part of this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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You know I was thinking the same thing. I am not 100% sure when the subjunctive is required, but I thought this sentence may require it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

I stated the suggested translation into my computer's microphone 5 or 6 times and it was not accepted. Finally, I changed "jardin" to "patio" and it was accepted. Anyone else have these kind of tech issues?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oletuv

"nunca he dicho que no me gusta su jardín a usted" was marked wrong. I put "a usted" to emphasize that "su" means "you" and not "his" or "her". Is it incorrect grammar to put "a usted" at the end of this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DJdeRidder

I believe 'a usted' can only be added when it refers to a personal pronoun ('le da un regalo a usted'), not when it refers to a possessive pronoun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oletuv

Thanks DJ, you are absolutely right and I just gave you a lingot. I found the following on the spanishdict.com grammar site under the Possessive Adjectives section: "Since su can have five meanings (his, her, your (formal, singular), their, your (formal, plural)), it is sometimes helpful to use a prepositional phrase with personal pronouns or names instead." Saludos Ole

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesa67

"yarda". :)

6 months ago