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  5. "Dia daoibh! Dia is Muire dui…

"Dia daoibh! Dia is Muire duit!"

Translation:Hello! Hello to you too!

December 5, 2014

98 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taoistextremist

So what's the literal meaning here? I saw somewhere else that "is" can mean "agus", so is that what's going on here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

God to you. God and Mary to you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seosamh2

I put that too and got bet out of it. The feckers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eoin_France

I put 'God be with you. God and Mary be with you...'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dyzect

So the Irish had no way to greet each other before Catholicism?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grace888319

Whatever "God" was handy - we weren't fussy. Some of them were Wimmin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narizhna

I don't understand why "hello all!" is not right for the first part. How else am I supposed to stress that this is plural? And if I don't, how the program would understand I've learn the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciarab.17

Dia duit = hello (singular you) , dia daoibh = hello (plural you)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The exercise presumes that you understand the difference, just as it would when you translate sibh to “you”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AingealMcM

You are absolutely right. Meaning has been pushed to one side, the context for using the plural should be acknowledged.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torowan

Cultural usage question - is this same terminology routinely used by Irish speakers that are not Catholic, with no hesitation? I imagine some devout Muslim immigrants may try to learn the language ... how would they adapt this? (I am NOT asking to debate migration policy or re-open the Troubles; am just trying to understand, it seems like this could be sensitive.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoChuisleMoChroi

It probably isn't that much of a problem. All English speakers say "goodbye" (god be with ye) without hesitation because it is so ingrained into the language that to native speakers, the meaning is simply a salutation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen286004

It just really means hello no one takes it literally


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

Or even a Protestant. That is a good question. I'm curious to know, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torowan

So, I did a web search and found:

"In Irish we are all taught at school that 'hello' is Dia Duit (god be with you), and that the reply is Dia is Muire duit (God and Mary be with you).

Some Protestants may not feel completely comfortable with that expression you may be thinking. [...] The intial greeting is the same (go mbeannaí) Dia dhuit but the reply is different -

Go mbeannaí an céanna dhuitse - may the same bless you."

Source: http://cluaindaimh.blogspot.com/2011/05/bit-of-protestant-irish.html Proverbial caveat: "It's on the internet so it must be true!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonsieurCal

I obviously know why they might take offence, but both Muslims and protestants revere God and Mary, or should I say Mariam and Allah.

I love when the history is hidden in plain sight in a language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

This reminds me of when I took a semester of Arabic. One phrase we learned was "Insha'Allah", pretty much literally "God willing" like the common English expression. The main difference is that everyone, Muslim or otherwise, says it all the time. They use it the way we use "I hope".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

And this became ojalá in Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronzetheSling

Is it just me, or does 'daoibh' sound like 'reeve' or 'weeve'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

That's how it's supposed to sound: /ɣiv/
http://www.ipachart.com/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaran201

Is this sentence saying hello to a group first of all, and then to a a specific person? As if you were speaking at a function and said hello to the audience, and then hello to say a guest of honour?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Sorta. The first is to a group, and the second is a response to that person. There'd be no Muire if it was what you suggested.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaran201

Thank you, have a lingot :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karl173994

The 1st sentence 'Dia daoibh' (you plural) is spoken to a group, if you wanted to say hello to one person initially you would say 'Dia dhuit' (you singular). The response as galaxyrocker pointed out is 'Dia is muire duit' responding to that singular person. If the reply was to a crowd it would be: ' Dia is muire daoibh.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barbara.gr5

"Dia daoibh! Dia is Muire duit!", "Dia duit! Dia is Muire duit!", "Dia daoibh! Dia is Muire daoibh!"

What's the difference between the three and when would you use them? I'm confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

daoibh is "to you (pl)" and duit is "to you (s)".
http://www.irishpage.com/quiz/preppron.htm

Literally, you're saying "God to you! God and Mary to you!" The first part (God to you) is the initial greeting. The second part (God and Mary to you) is the reply back. Whether you use "duit" or "daoibh" depends on how many people you're addressing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karl173994

'Dia duit' - Hello (to you singular). 'Dia daoibh' - Hello (to a group/you plural). 'Dia is muire duit' - And hello to you too (you singular). 'Dia is muire daoibh' - And hello to you too (you plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sally293272

Thank you so much!!!I had the same problem over and over!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vainnemoinen

i'm just into this lesson, so this might become apparent to me later, but i find the pattern for aspiration or elision of consonants utterly confounding, especially with the modern spellings. "dia daoibh" sounds like "dya wheeve", and "...muire duit" like "murreh vut". this is complicated further by the apparent shift of the dental "d" to a soft labial "wh/v". some phonetic footnotes would be handy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

I found this on YouTube. It's very thorough. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIokUII7LX0


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Dia's Muire duit! should be accepted. It is, in fact, the more usual spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraleiNig

I've never seen that spelling before. I live in Dublin though, is that something they do in other parts of the country? If I recall correctly, there is no apostrophes in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

's is an abbreviation of is, which is itself an abbreviation of agus. The apostrophe certainly exists in Irish. Probably its main use is in the spelling of past-tense verbs where the stem begins with a vowel sound:

D'oscail sí an fhuinneog = She opened the window

D'fhan mé thar oíche = I stayed overnight


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraleiNig

Ah, forgive me, I totally forgot about that.

I more thought that "is" couldn't really be abbreviated, or if it could, I've seriously never heard it before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamOShaughnessy

no support for the non religious " Salút" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoChuisleMoChroi

Not to burst your bubble, but Salút has religious origins as well. It comes from the Latin "Salve" (hello) which doubled as an invocation of Salus, goddess of health and safety.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maolchonai

Dia (deeya) daoibh (deeyav) is (pronounce 'hiss' without the h) Muire duit ( pronounce as one word Mwirraditch)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e.venka

Dia's Muire duit. Reply to hello. (Literally: God and Mary to you.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MinHayes

The comments are very helpful - dia daoibh!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanDeux

I'm all for a little bit of a challenge but the pronounciations of these phrases make me want to go back to learning the Japanese Kanji writing system just for relief.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

This might help:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIokUII7LX0

Irish spelling is very rule-driven. It's just that the rules are different from what we English-speakers are accustomed to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rashtrakut

Is this such a common phrase? It has shown up about ten times in my lesson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It’s as common as its English translation is in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flan2784

In America I only hear it used at church; I've never heard anyone use it in their daily life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

What scilling means is that "Dia duit. Dia is Muire duit" is just as common in Ireland as "Hello. Oh, hi" is in the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flan2784

Ah! Thank you for clarifying


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EileanoirCM

I think the option of the word "plural" is a little confusing here. I was unsure if it was asking me to identify the first "Hello" as having been said to a group or not, so I added "plural" after the first "Hello", which of course makes no sense as a sentence but the idea is correct. Feels like a trick question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiloMonster96

I put "Hello! And hello to you too!" why is that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

Report it (flag it) and suggest it. The team just didn't think of that as a possibility.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vainnemoinen

fair question -- especially as it's offered as another correct translation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JBranch1998

I put "God to y'all! God and Mary to you!" and it wasn't accepted. What was wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2295

Yes, that is literally what the words mean, but it's used as a greeting, so the appropriate translation would be "Hello! Hello to you, too!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraRose814403

Why is the name Mary in there? Yet, when you type as it should be, it is is considered wrong.
**"Hello! Hello to you too Mary."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

You can't translate it literally -- when people say in English "Goodbye", they do not mean "God be with you" even if that's where it comes from, and translating it with "God" in there doesn't make sense.

The Irish greeting is literally something like "God to you" and the reply "God and Mary to you" -- but it's just a formulaic reply to a greeting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgugler

I am really struggling with pronunciation of Irish. I wish there was a an option to play it slower or a section with the alphabet.


[deactivated user]

    Can "duit" be spelled "dhuit"? i have an old Irish grammar book tha gives that spelling.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mia111987

    The first time I wrote 'Hi, hi to you too' but I got it wrong, and it said it rly ment 'Hi, hello to you too, I know that hi and hello are different words but dont they still basically mean the same thing? ( They probably mean something different but they are both a greeting, right?)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    I would just flag it and mark "My answer should be accepted". It looks like a simple oversight on the part of the team, who need to hard-code in each response individually.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grace888319

    I was taught in school - very rusty now but all the same it translates as "God be with you" and the response "God and Mary be with you" used as a greeting but the translation given might confuse a new learner.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelle133904

    Doesn't dia mean god?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    Yes. As has been discussed on this page already, this fixed phrase literally translates as "God to you! God and Mary to you!" but is used as a greeting exchange exactly the way we use "Hello! Oh, hello!" and variations thereupon.

    The English phrase "good bye" was originally "God be with ye".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hart-Kevin

    This is an old traditional greeting meaning, “God be with you.” The traditional reply been, “God and Mary be with you.” Irish is a poetic language and I would argue that the likes of phrases like these should stand alone . It’s a bit like saying ‘Céad míle fáilte‘ just means ‘you’re very welcome.’ It does but everybody knows its traditional meaning, ‘A hundred thousand welcomes.’ Would you change that then why change Dia daoibh! Dia is Máire duit ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaronMH

    It sounds like the speaker is pronouncing the D in duit like an English V. Why is that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    I don't hear /v/, I hear something closer to /ɣ/. And I believe that is how one of the three major dialect groups pronounces it.

    http://www.ipachart.com/

    Irish is Irish. Don't expect English spelling conventions to apply.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIokUII7LX0


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobPenne12

    What context changes it from Dia duit to Dia daoibh?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Whether you're talking to one person or to several of them.

    Use Dia duit! when you're speaking to one person, Dia daoibh! when speaking to several at once.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandalOulton

    I personally didn't find any of this useful, being introduced so early. It was probably just me -- my mind wanted to understand the why's and wherefore's but instead it was "just memorize like a parrot" with no understanding of the constructions that make it work, and so it has not stuck well for me. I'm not asking for changes, I'm guessing it worked fine for others. Just stating my experience. I'll go back and revisit this module when I have the grammatical framework in my head to understand duit vs daoibh etc, so I'll be fine in the end.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielC.To2

    Isnt duit or diaobh 'to You or to yous'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    Duit is "to you".
    Daoibh is "to y'all" or "to yous" or however you say the plural.

    This has been explained before on this page. There is even a chart.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlT2rD

    Is "is" the same as "agus" and if so, is it used in any other context?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    "Is" is short for "agus". I don't know about other contexts, though.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FinnHallwo

    this is wrong it is you plural not you all


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    "You all" is one of the ways the many dialects of English disambiguates the plural "you" from the singular "you". Plenty of people say "you all", "y'all", "youse", etc. No one actually says "you plural".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alisha564487

    Wrong translation. According to Duolingo Muire is Mary


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    Yes, that is what the word literally translates to. However, the greeting is highly idiomatic. The appropriate translation is not the literal translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chowmain1

    Hello. Hello to you too. God be with you. This was rejected! Irony, íoróin?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    No, not irony. This is a highly idiomatic phrase, and those do not get translated literally.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uq.

    "God and Mary to you"

    lolwut


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    You realise that "Goodbye" is from "God be with ye"? Irish is not the only language that uses God-related terms for greetings.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    And what is one of the popular things to say when someone sneezes? God bless you.

    (The alternative, of course, is "gesundheit", which is German for "good health".)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uq.

    Most people just say "Bless you"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2295

    Yes, but it's short for/comes from "God bless you".

    (I'm in the "gesundheit" camp myself, but etymology is etymology.)

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