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"Ik wil graag een glaasje water."

Translation:I would like a glass of water.

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3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jveranos

I wrote I'd like a glass of water please. Isn't graag synonymous to please in the sentence?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzcanadian

From native Dutch speaker who teaches English: "Ik wil graag..." best translates as "I would like..."

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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I'd like and I would like have the same meaning. I'd is a contraction of I would.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wicketd
Wicketd
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No. Graag in this example expresses that you have the wish for a glass of water. Knowing this, you can see that when answering graag to the question of whether or not you want something, you're pretty much saying I would love that!. As for expressing a wish, I'm sure people all throughout the Netherlands will utter this exact phrase today:

Wat wil ik toch graag een biertje!

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzcanadian

But you can use please in that same way in English too: "Would you like a glass of water?" -- "Please!" What is the difference between using or not using "graag" in Duo's sentence?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Graag is an adverb that means gladly, with pleasure, willingly.

While graag and alstublieft/alsjeblieft may not have a direct translation to English, they frequently display 'intent', 'desire', 'gratitude' -- and often can fill the role of "please" and "thank you."

With that said, the inclusion of graag in this sentence acts to both 'soften' the tone (i.e. such that it does not sound like a command -- Compare: "I want water!" and "I would like (some) water (please).")

Additionally it reduces some of the 'sharpness' in the request -- thus offering the recipient of the request (perhaps a waiter/waitress/server in this case) a rather 'kind' and appreciative tone.

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wicketd
Wicketd
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I'd say that in this particular example it expresses using 'really' versus not using it. For example:

  • Ik wil een biertje - I would like a beer
  • Ik wil graag een biertje - I would really like a beer

It's just there to provide emphasis. It also tends to sound friendlier when requesting something.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guissmo
guissmo
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"I would like to have a glass of water" is not allowed but "I would like to have a glass of water, please" is. This kind of bothers me. Is anyone else bothered? :)

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrentNock

Could it mean I would love a glass of water?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeManu1

"Should" is marked as wrong, but in my old grammar books "should" and " shall" go with "I" and "we", " will" and "would" go with the rest.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tinyset
tinyset
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I really don't like this male's voice. His accent is very hard to understand :(

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Reply2 years ago