https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADSharpe

Different Origins

Hello! I just wanted to share some images I found recently, showing different words in different languages in Europe, and where they came from!

You can find more of these images here! http://mic.com/articles/103100/9-fascinating-maps-show-the-origins-of-words-we-use-every-day?utm_source=policymicTBLR_medium=main_campaign=social I thought they were pretty interesting, I hope you do too. (Sorry, if these have been posted here before)

December 5, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hdcanis

Couple of notes:

In the first map about bears, it should be noted that while in Finnish "karhu" is nowadays the "normal" word, it is originally an euphemism (it's a word magic thing, you don't want to call a bear by its real name so you call it karhu or honeypaw or apple of the woods or some such thing), probably referring to the rough texture of its fur (in Finnish "karhea").

The "real" name is assumed to be "otso" or "ohto" (and it might be that the Sami word "guovza" is related to that).

In the map about apples (found in the link), it is indeed a bit of an oddity that Finnic languages (including Finnish and Estonian) have picked up a word possibly of Indo-Iranian origin, but there seems to be bunch of words of that origin...and indeed it has been suggested that Uralic languages might originate from somewhere south of Ural mountains where they might have had some contact with proto-Persians...(another word of that origin is "marras", archaic word for death)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shelducks

That (about what to call a bear) is the best thing I've heard all day. Thanks :)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owlish_Owl

Cool about bears!

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xeno78

This is really fascinating! Thanks for sharing.

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeniusJack

This is absolutely fascinating, many thanks for sharing! :D

Wow! :D I never would have thought that pineapple was so similar throughout all these different languages. It's going to be easy to ask for it, wherever I go ;-)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/putinpresident

I love it. Thanks ;)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/araparseghian

In Brazilian Portuguese, the word for pineapple is abacaxi.

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WK99

I'm not sure about Czech and Slovak, but in Polish, we also have the word "cerkiew" for "church", but it's only used for an Orthodox church.

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owlish_Owl

Oh I suspected Polish had this word for Orthodox church! See my comment below about Ukrainian and Russian

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WK99

Thanks for your input! I know, however, that in Slovene, (and I strongly suspect it's similar the other Southern Slavic languages), "cerkev" is the only word and is used for both.

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gomos

This is extremely interesting, thank you. I like how most words for "church" come from different Greek words. And I had no idea the English-Germanic-Slavic word for it comes from "Κύριος"!

Also it's funny when all languages say it the same way and there is one or two rebel languages, like with pineapple and piña.

Oh, and you can find many more here: http://www.reddit.com/r/etymologymaps

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yerrick

Seriously, I think that Christianity as we know it would not exist without the Greeks. It's weird how little they come up in typical history education (post-Alexander).

December 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusingThoughts

Of course it doesn't include every language. I don't see Cornish or Sorbian there

March 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

I have seen this several times but what I don't understand is how "gül, rosa,warda" have the same origin. I think there is a mistake there, especially about gül :)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rhythmialex

Hey, I had the same doubt. But a quick search for the etymology of gül led me here. Hope it helps.

I have to say that *wr̥dʰo- cannot be more weird. :)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

thanks :)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

Selcen_Ozturk, the etymology via Persian gul is explained here http://nisanyansozluk.com/?k=g%C3%BCl=1 (it's less than obvious ... ).

[EDIT - That link seems to send you to imla, but if you search gül you'll see].

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

Thanks :) I still find the evolution of this word really strange :D

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeniusJack

It's fascinating, really! I wonder how words that seem so different (and mean the same thing) can be related! :D Language is strange.

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AureliaUK

Just to point out that in the UK we also use the word ale in relation to beer, most often these days in the context of "real ale". Indeed, ale is almost certainly the older and more traditional word.

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owlish_Owl

"Church" is a bit wrong for Slavic languages. Ukrainian has a word "Kostiol", it's a Catholic church, and "cerkva" means an Orthodox church. Russian language also has the word "Kostiol", there's no really need for yellow color there

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sjodni

AWESOME!

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John.Ru

Very cool, especially the pineapple part. I grew up in egypt and we call it ananas there too!

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hataldir

Slavic "medved" is not "honey-eater". It comes from words "honey" and "to know".

December 6, 2014
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