https://www.duolingo.com/soheyl.moheb

vous êtes une femme (the pronunciation)

in google translate and http://www.ispeech.org/text.to.speech it is pronounced like: vu zet un fam but here it is pronounced like: vu zet o zun fam so is that the difference between the accents or one of them is wrong?

December 5, 2014

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Owlivern

In French, we can make a "liaison" when the next word starts with a, e, i, o, u, un, on, ... So you can sometimes pronounce the last letter of the word : Vous êteS {z} une femme, je suiS {z} un garçon. :)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward

"So you can sometimes pronounce the last letter of the word..."

So, are you saying it would be correct both ways, whether we pronounce the end of êtes or not? This is a choice we get to make? Or is it a matter of regional dialect?

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlivern

You can refer to allintolearning's comment, great links :)

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/soheyl.moheb

there is another difference: in http://www.ispeech.org/text.to.speech ,,, je suis un garçon is pronounced like: je suie zan garcon ,,, but in google translate and duolingo it's pronounced like: je suis On garcon,,, so which one is correct?

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

The tricky thing is that 'a' has more than one sound and 'o' has more than one sound and so does 'u'. The 'n' afterwards changes the sound of the vowel, but it is not actually pronounced itself unless there is an 'e' after it, which changes the vowel sound again. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1101422

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4013405

Be careful because google translate can be wrong and duolingo's computer voice has had some odd pronunciations before as well. Some people pronounce the 'e' mildly after a 't'. Here is some pronunciation help: http://french.about.com/od/begpron/ http://www.frenchlanguageguide.com/pronunciation/

Now for the rules of liason:http://french.about.com/library/pronunciation/bl-liaisons.htm Some liasons are required; some are forbidden; some are optional.

The reason you are finding more than one pronunciation of this is that the liason after the verb être is optional, but I would put the liason in myself as without it is considered lower register and it is good to be in the habit of it for higher register situations. Yet, I think Duolingo's computer algorithm is not catching that there is a consonant sound from the 't' and that is what would be linked to the vowel in the next word. No need to hear the 's' at the end of "êtes" and change it to 'z' sound as you would for the 's' at the end of "Vous", so the google translation sound is closer if this has not been fixed on Duolingo.
http://french.about.com/library/pronunciation/bl-liaisons-r.htm http://french.about.com/library/pronunciation/bl-liaisons-f.htm http://french.about.com/library/pronunciation/bl-liaisons-o.htm

Here is an excellent site with native speakers and it shows where they come from: http://fr.forvo.com/search-fr/vous%20%C3%AAtes%20une%20femme/

and yes, the site you provided seems to have good pronunciation also.

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/soheyl.moheb

great explanation ... this is outstanding... thanks a lot for the time you took. ;-)

December 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/soheyl.moheb

hi allintolearning as you're answer was so excellent i give you another lingot. i cant learn a great deal of pronunciation using these links. thanks a lot again ..... ;-)

December 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexSoupy

In both cases it is what's called a "liaison", where you can connect the sound of the last letter of the first word to the first syllable of the second word. Refer to Mussel1's comment for his examples. Computer programs tend to just have a pronunciation for a word programmed and don't often take into account the "liaison". The correct way of saying it is with the liaison, but if you are sounding each word out separately obviously you wouldn't include it.

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/soheyl.moheb

tnx a lot

December 6, 2014
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