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"En la calle no había un alma."

Translation:There was not a soul on the street.

5 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

This is a strange phrase for this particular section on religion!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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I think it shows the flexibility of the words. For instance, "soul" isn't limited to a religious context, similar to its fluidity in English. Wd wouldn't have known that :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

Why is the imperfect being used?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
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It is probably setting the stage for something else to happen. There was not a soul in the street. Suddenly, a shot rang out...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

OK.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Momo4618
Momo4618
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Can you say, "No había un alma en la calle." Don't get why sentences are flipped around sometimes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wratsey

"Not a soul was on the street" sounds OK to me but DL thought otherwise. Also I thought "haber" was an auxilliary verb used to form compound verb forms. Can anyone explain why it is used here alone and instead of "estar" in the imperfect tense?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

Había in this sentence is the imperfect tense of "hay" there is or there are, making it there was or there were. If you wanted to say "Not a soul was on the street" perhaps "Ni un alma estaba en la calle" would be a more literal translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chistesen

This is said in English, but is it said in Spanish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

I believe so, someone like a Spanish-speaking author might use it in a book, or someone might use it describing a dream or a situation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

i think it's odd the language does that but when two a's appear at other times in a sentence the spanish just blend then together, like "va a ...". i have no problem saying la alma, or la agua. i wonder why historically the Spaniards felt differently.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smh1181
smh1181
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Is there a reason it says that "un alma" is feminine? That's a mistake, right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I believe that "alma" is feminine, but, like "el agua", the determiner gets masculinized to avoid the adjacent As. Search for "alma" on this page:

http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/genderreversal.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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AurosHarman has the correct reason.

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=756427

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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The audio doesn't help either. The "fast" audio says "una alma" and the slow audio says "un alma". This mispronunciation between una and un occurs in many other exercises and has been this way for many months. That error alone must account for many thousands of error reports! Is it so difficult to fix?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/murph_d

It is not a mistake. In real speech, Spanish speakers as well as English speakers, run their words together. Context and an extensive vocabulary help to sort it all out. If you haven't yet, try out the stories in the labs section (this may only be with the desktop version). It really helps with listening comprehension.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcelaj

Also be aware of words of Greek origin end in "ma" and use "un" / "el".

Sistema, programa, clima, problema, tema, drama...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kennypi
kennypi
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Words that end in -ma tend to be masculine, but alma is an exception to that rule.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daisy211
daisy211
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Narration for a ghost town movie?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/topnotchkj

I put "in the street, there was no soul" and duo said I was incorrect, which doesn't bother me. It bothers me that this is the first time I'm learning "alma" and the suggestions duo gives are "soul, core, or feeling" then they say the correct sentence is "in the street, there was no one" ...how am I supposed to have guessed no one?? I think if duo is going to mark it incorrect, the suggested answer should at least be "there was not a soul on the street" like it is here in the comments.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

In a matching excercise I was prompted to translate "almas" as "cores" are there other interesting meanings for this word, or contexts in which it's used. I wonder if spanish computers are advertised as being "quad-soul".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donrua1

"There was no soul in the street" was marked correct, but doesnt make much sense

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beeohdee

I was under the impression that I had to translate había to some form of 'have' and tried 'There had not been a soul in the street.' Mark incorrect. Is this a valid translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerrsimh

"Habia" here is the imperfect of "hay", meaning "there was".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drj0000

"In the street there was no soul" marked correct but so far from their answer in meaning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joeyfino

Can it be "No habia el alma en la calle"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iXPLODE

At first I didn't realize what it meant.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaQueer

Could anyone explain the use of "había" in this sentence? I would've assumed "hubo" would be preferable unless speaking about how a particular street had been vacated for an indefinite period of time, as perhaps would be the case in a "ghost town" that lost its once vibrant population. But if talking about a particular incident, why wouldn't the preterite be preferable?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EquanimousLingo
EquanimousLingo
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dangit, I wrote, "En la calle no habia una arma..".. i need to listen better.. lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Virginia373269

There was nobody in the street

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josojtumadre

This is placed here? Strange

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomgoldie1

Would estában work here?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

No, because alma is singular and estaban denotes plural.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/murph_d

Also, haber and estar have different meanings ("there is" a soul................a soul "is").

Un alma no estaba en la calle .......A soul was not on the street

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanneBrown1

why did I get told that it was no one in the street? It is common in the UK to substitute 'not a soul' for no one

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxine_scott

In English we say "There was not a soul on the street" meaning that there was no one on the street

9 months ago