"They walk toward the restaurant."

Translation:De går mot restaurangen.

December 5, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jayna_Johns

'Mot' means both against and toward?

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8

Yes.

December 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Bailjo
  • 1441

¯(°_o)/¯

March 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AllanGhl

Why not use " till ", like in the sentence "Ankan simmar till flickan" to say that the duck is swimming to (towards) the girl

April 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Those prepositions mean different things and are not interchangeable in the girl/duck sentence either:

Ankan simmar till flickan 'The duck swims to the girl'
Ankan simmar mot flickan 'The duck swims towards the girl'

De går till restaurangen 'They go to the restaurant'
De går mot restaurangen 'They walk toward the restaurant'

June 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AllanGhl

Thanks, you made it clear !

June 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emuliah

Probably because they are only walking towards the restaurant but it's not necessarily their destination. In the other sentence the duck swims to the girl, aiming to get there.

April 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AllanGhl

Ok, so we should take "till" as wanting to go in a direction in general when "mot" would be the actual realisation of that want to go in that direction.. Not obvious, but I take it ! Thanks !

April 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emuliah

I meant the other way around. So "mot" would mean going to the direction of the restaurant in general and "till" would mean wanting to go somewhere and presumably getting there :) I'm not sure though if it's possible to use "till" with restaurant like "de går till restaurangen"

April 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AllanGhl

Oh, ok, I understood it wrong then, indeed. Could be great if a Swede could settle this once and for all ! ^^

April 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

It's perfectly natural to use "De går till restaurangen" to say "they're going/walking to the restaurant", yes.

November 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jgswenson

Not a fan of "mot" meaning both towards and against... If any Swedish people read this, what is the practical way you distinguish between the two meanings? I'd figure there would be some colloquialism or slang way to speak that makes trying to describe this action more clear. Could be wrong though haha

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Context makes it clear, there's never a problem. :)

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/jgswenson

probably just an artifact of this being a Germanic language like English then. because I know in some Latin languages, dual meaning words either are very infrequent or have some sort of distinguishable change. to hint at context other than the rest of the sentence. Thanks!

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

I know that this is an olde threade, but other examples exist in other languages: the German word "nach" can mean either "towards" or "after".

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucasglot

But what about 'åt'? As I understand, it also means to or toward. Would åt instead of mot be correct?

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

No, "åt" cannot be used in the sense of going to or towards something. It's used when you for example give something to someone ("han ger hunden åt henne", "he gives the dog to her") or when something is pointing towards something, without actually moving ("kompassen pekar åt norr", "the compass points to the north"). It can however mean movement if you attach the general direction to the word. "Bakåt" for example means "backwards", like "bilen rör sig bakåt", "the car is moving backwards".

November 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/El-Sorbagi

First thing i dont like in swedish, mot word meanings....

March 22, 2017
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