"Fuair sí griandó agus ní raibh sí ábalta snámh."

Translation:She got sunburn and she was not able to swim.

4 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/biauwaz
biauwaz
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is ''ábalta'' as terrible english loanword as it sounds to be? Or just a coincidence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Not sure. But there is another way to say it: in ann.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biauwaz
biauwaz
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Like - Ní raibh sí in ann a shnámh?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

You don't need the a, but yes. ní raibh sí in ann snámh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikemilg
Mikemilg
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Would "...níor fhéad sé snámh." be correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prony-dH-Bray

'In ann' is actually defined as = ábalta. Ábalta = láidir nó cliste nó oilte go leor chun rud a dhéanamh. But 'in ann' tends to have a wider usage. In the case of a sunburn, she is too weak to swim.. But it really is her choice to avoid the pain: she is able but not string enough to do it...

So both are equall, 'in ann' sounds less formal to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanTravers
SeanTravers
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Surely swimming in cold water would help!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donncha514681

Why isn't "She got sunburn and she was unable to swim" accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiachra691900
Fiachra691900
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Is there a past tense for «ní féidir léi» ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biauwaz
biauwaz
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Ba fhéidir léi would be my guess :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prony-dH-Bray

Spelled b'fhéidir. Those mean can/might. They are associated to practicality to do, authorisation, likelyhood, of something happening.

Negative: ní féidir / niorbh fhéidir.

I would not see that as an obvious choice here, unless expressing doubt if someone suggest they saw her swim, and you argue that she couldn't have been swimming...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John365571

fuair sí dó gréine agus ní raibh sí in ann snámh. Perhaps has a better sense that she was not in a position to swim rather than not able. ( I don't like the sound but ábalta is used; just not in all areas)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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This might be because I'm not a native English speaker but how come it's "get sunburn" instead of "get a sunburn" or "sunburnt"?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rev._mother

It’s not you. In the US, we say got a sunburn, or got sunburn or got sunburned, all acceptable. Should have been accepted.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kel.zanne
kel.zanne
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Sunburnt, as well.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Medical conditions are a mixed bunch in English. Some are used without an article (he has cancer, she has appendicitis), some are used with a definite article (he has the flu, she has the measles), and some are used with an indefinite article (he has a rash, she has a migraine).

In the case of the noun "sunburn"/griandó, English speakers tend to say "I got (some) sunburn on my arms", without an article, though the adjectival form ("sunburnt"/griandóite) is also common - "I got sunburnt yesterday".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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Oh! So it's used as an uncountable noun!!

I see! Thank you for the clarification :)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coleintherain
coleintherain
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Are you from the States or elsewhere? I've never heard "got sunburn" in the US though I do hear "got (some) sun" to mean anything from a tan to a mild sunburn.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deirdre417845

Never heard -got sunburn in Eastern US- either got a sunburn or got sunburned.

2 months ago
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