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  5. "Ní mhothaíonn siad."

" mhothaíonn siad."

Translation:They do not feel.

December 5, 2014

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/exeisen

"Feel" in what sense? I sometimes think that the single-word definitions that Duolingo gives are too simple because the words they give as definitions can mean so many things––not to mention that they can be transitive or intransitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sleepypie

This may help: http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/mothaigh It can also be used when discussing texts e.g. I feel this poem represents...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWWTaylor

I would have to disagree, and call the official translation here incorrect (and am not able to imagine what the constructor of the Irish sentence had in mind). There is no way that — in English — you can just "feel". There needs to be a stated complement. You can feel something (perceive it, perhaps physically), or feel some way or some how (e.g. hungry). When using feel to express an opinion or sentiment (about a poem, say) a complementary clause must follow, perhaps introduced by "that".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaroleansAttack

To say "They do not feel." in English means that the subjects have no feeling, whether in the physical sense that their nerve endings are dead, or the metaphorical sense that they are callous and without empathy. I have no idea how old this comment is because mobile doesn't display a date, but I still felt like clearing this up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoneDog1

maybe "ni mhothaíonn siad" is not meant to be a complete sentence by itself, here, but just part of a sentence, such as another exercise in this section, "ni mhothaíonn siad go bhfuil fáilte rompu" (spoiler alert: "they do not feel that they are welcome"). after all, some of these exercises translate just a word or a phrase, such as "today's date" or even simply "apple."

nevertheless, couldn't "ní mhothaíonn siad" simply mean something like "they are not aware;" e.g., "tá trioblóid rompu, ach ní mhothaíonn siad" ("they are headed for trouble, but they do not notice," or "there is trouble ahead of them, but they are unaware")?

or maybe "ní mhothaíonn siad" means "they do not feel," in the sense of "they have no feelings," as in, "beiríodh na gliomaigh ina mbeatha, ach ná bí buartha: ní mhothaíonn siad" ("the lobsters were boiled alive, but don't worry: they do not feel" [which personally i do not believe for a second, by the way])?

or maybe "ní mhothaíonn siad" means "they do not wake up" or "they do not become conscious"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

couldn't "ní mhothaíonn siad" simply mean something like "they are not aware;" e.g., "tá trioblóid rompu, ach ní mhothaíonn siad" ("they are headed for trouble, but they do not notice," or "there is trouble ahead of them, but they are unaware")?

No, that would require an object - ní mhothaíonn siad é - "they don't sense/perceive it" (or í in the case of the feminine trioblóid).

or maybe "ní mhothaíonn siad" means "they do not wake up" or "they do not become conscious"?

Both of those examples involve a change of state, so you wouldn't use the verb in that way - you might say something like ní thagann an mothú iontu, but it seems a bit strained.

Your lobster example would work, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John365571

Without an object the most likely translation is that - they aren't conscious They are in a coma or something

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