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"¿Puedo tomar otra cerveza por favor?"

Translation:Can I have another beer, please?

5 years ago

99 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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at last, a really useful sentence!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Hehe...That it is. Salud!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tscook20

I don't know. I thought the 'you can spend the night with us' sentence was pretty useful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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¡No! Veinte y dos son suficientes.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redeye011

Non-native English speakers should know that "Can I have another beer, please?" is poor grammar. The correct sentence would be "May I have another beer, please?" "Can" is an expression of ability. "May" is an expression of permission. That being said, many if not most Americans would use "can I" synonymously with "may I." Grammar Girl suggests I may be too picky: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/can-versus-may?page=all

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartGlasgow

Living in the UK my entire life, "Can I..?" is far more commonly used to infer the same meaning as "May I..?". As a taxi driver I am asked several times a night "Can I go to...?", but I think I can count on my hands the number of times I've been asked "May I go to...?" (usually posh people). You can be picky about the exact dictionary definition ("Can I have a beer?" "Yes, you are able to have a beer...Would you like to ask for one perhaps?"), but "can" (in the UK at least) is widely accepted as conveying the same meaning as "may" when used in these sort of situations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redeye011

good point, StuartGlasgow. What I've learned from all this is that Spanish doesn't seem to make any distinction between may and can. It's "poder" either way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saballama

That is not just in the UK, in the US we use "can" as well, and I for one and annoyed when people correct me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GruvTrain

"May I" is correct, but "can I" has also become correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Most Brits too.
You're absolutely correct, grammatically it should be "may I", but in practice I doubt many people would make the distinction. I vividly remember a teacher from my school days going nuts about this whenever anyone said "can I..." in his class. His answer was always "you CAN, but you MAY NOT!". That was back in the 70s though, so things have probably changed...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian11e
Brian11e
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this distinction was even made in a movie by a teacher, I can't remember the name though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

The distinction still applies today.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

@ph516503 Same here in the Midwest U.S.

@Brian11e I think the movie that had this was Fast Times at Ridgemont High. But I could be wrong. Haven't seen it in ages.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoctilucaFirefly

Not so much any more. That may have at one point been the official difference but newer definitions of the word "can" include both expressions of ability and also permission. I would say that 'can' is perfectly acceptable but that to me 'May I' has a more FORMAL politeness to it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mhsutton

So how would you say 'May I have another beer, please' - or am I missing the point?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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My understanding is that you're perfectly safe to use poder, as shown in this example. It seems that Spanish doesn't have this distinction and poder can be used to check on either ability or permission to do something. However, if you want to formally ask permission you could use "permitir", as in "me permite fumar?" - "am i allowed to smoke?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/waltrer
waltrer
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muy bien :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laureed
laureed
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podria also works for could i have another beer

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InfamousMrSatan
InfamousMrSatan
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The more polite way to say "Can/May I have..." it is actually "Me puede dar" .. or "Can you give me..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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alternatively you could say "me gustaria" or "quisiera" - which I think both mean "I would like...."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgkoon
kgkoon
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At a local Mexican restaurant I frequent, the waiter (native Spanish speaker) suggested "me gustaría" for ordering.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jalnt
jalnt
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Australian here. I never hear "may" used at all except as a synonym of "might". (it may be on the table)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrSands

What about using "could I"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Here's a use of could rule for poder

In the preterite or imperfect to mean "could" or "was able": Which tense you use depends on whether the reference is to a one-time event (preterite) or something occurring over a period of time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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You are missing a point here! Yes 'could' IS past tense of 'can' (was able cf am/are/is able) but the meaning here is not the past but the conditional - in English it sounds sort of more polite or less brusque esp for those who preserve a may/can distinction. So instead of "puedo tomar...." (Can I...) say "podría tomar...." (Could I....). Having said all that to clarify "could" i think "Quisiera..." or "Me gustaría.... are more commonly used but would like a native speaker to comment...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mloclm

Absolutely! "may" was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markgjensen

the http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/May%20 offers this: 1. (expressing possibility) he may return at any moment puede volver de un momento a otro I may tell you and I may not puede que te lo diga o puede que no he may have lost it puede que lo haya perdido it may be that… podría ser que… you may well ask! ¡eso quisiera saber yo! we may as well go ya puestos, podíamos ir

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanmay.4

How do you say "can I have THE OTHER beer please". Is it "puedo tomar la otra cerveza por favor"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xopheriggs
xopheriggs
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One of the most necessary sentences to memorize in all languages.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brhodewalt

I live and work in the U.S. We -- not all of us, but many of us -- distinguish between "can I" and "may I" in two related ways: the latter is a question of permission (vs. ability), and it also is considered more polite. I work in schools where you will hear teachers AND students make the distinction. It is considered pedantic to point out the distinction -- "Can you go to the bathroom quickly? I don't know. Have you ever tried?" -- but the difference is there anyway.

If you want something from someone in English, it's safe to choose "may I" over "can I."

As a Spanish learner, I want to learn to appear polite. I understand "puedo" will work for requests like this, but I'm trying to adopt "podría" and "me gustaría" and "quisiera" for the same reasons I train myself to use "usted" unless I'm speaking to a friend or young person.

Any native Spanish speakers who tell me I have this wrong, please reply or email. I would appreciate it. Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardojb

American as well, but I lived in Spain for three months and "yo quisiera" often resulted in a "huh?" I think it was almost too polite for a mundane thing as ordering a smoothie. I definitely understand wanting to come off as polite and I had the best experience with "Me gustaria". Just my experience anyway

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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I've no practical experience of this, but I'm sure I read in another thread here that "quiero" is perfectly normal when asking for something in a restaurant or bar, and quisiera / me gustaria can sometimes be considered a bit overly formal.

Before using this though, I'd want confirmation of this from a native speaker - to my (British) ears, "I want a beer" is bordering on being rude.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardojb

It sounds rude to me as well, but when I was at a tabac shop there I was trying to teach my partner to say "Can I have cigarettes?" as "Puedo tener cigarillos" and the shop cashier corrected me as "Quiero cigarillos" but that's my only real applicable experience.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brhodewalt

Thanks! Any idea how this relates to New World Spanish? Most of the people I speak Spanish with are natives of Mexico or the U.S. (or occasionally Central America).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardojb

I live in San Francisco now. "Me gustaria" has worked well at every taqueria, restuarant, etc. that I've been to here (although it's not Latin America). Since I moved here after I lived in Spain though, I haven't tried "yo quisiera" at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgkoon
kgkoon
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See my comment above. I asked a native Spanish speaker who works as a waiter this question and he said to use "me gustaría".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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I was just wondering if it is okay to use "to have"/"to take" interchangeably when speaking of food and beverages? I see that Duo prefers tomar over tener in most of these situations.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Tener is never used to speak of eating/drinking. Tomar is common, and used much more often than bebewr.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_k8mc_
_k8mc_
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does this have the same implications as the english phrase here? I know in French if you say another (autre) beer they will think you mean a different kind of beer, so you say one more beer instead - I thought it was the same in Spanish. When I was in Peru 'una más' seemed to be the more common phrasing. Am I just being crazy?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TortugaCielo

i had the same thought, requesting a DIFFERENT beer, brand or flavor. Guess that's because I enjoy only very fizzy, low-hops beers, so hubby often has to finish error-orders. Apparently for this we would use the word diferente to describe the change.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bsvad

Why isn't tomar conjugated to tomo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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It's because poder is conjugated to puedo: Poder (conjugated) + infinitive = able to do something. E.g. "puedo hablar español", "puedo comer un elefante para el desayuno", and so on...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hmn169

Can & could are interchangeable in requests of this type.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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Thanks for clearing that up, I'm having difficulty changing my English language idiosyncrasies.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Can I order another beer please? That's how we would say it in our part of the world. Tomar means to order in this context does it not?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tango-alpha

The literal translation of "puedo tomar otra cerveza" is "may I drink another beer."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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Isn't the literal translation "may I take another beer." which was accepted btw. (beber - to drink I guess could be used also)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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Is that sentence can be translated also as -

"Can I take another beer, please?"

in the sense of physically taking (by myself) another bottle of beer from the fridge? (for example)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Itay - yes I have seen it used in that context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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O.k, thank you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/newmilwaukeee

here, 'tomar' is used as have? now tomar can mean 'drink' 'take' and 'have'

Could you say "Puedo tener otra cerveza por favor?" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010
dj63010
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My understanding from the above comments is that tener should not be used when referring to food, only tomar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deddi.orpa

wht "can i have one more beer' is not correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ozytodd

the pronounciation between altra and otra is hard to distinguish

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FakeCrash

Why is it not required to add the article "una", as in "Puedo tomar una otra cerveza" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davievrh

In practice, I don't think this phrase would be used much by Spanish speakers - far too Anglo-Saxon polite!. More likely direct phrases like "me pones una cerveza"...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanBcn
DanBcn
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I worked in a hostel in Barcelona all of last summer, this was the sentence I heard (and used) the most.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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What's the most common "puedo tomar una otra cerveza" or "otra cerveza", or is the first one incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Badamente

What about, "Can I get a beer, please?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJFloyd

Why is tomar translated as "have" in this sentence, but in the sentence "El no puede tomor agua." the translation "He can't have water," is considered invalid? Seems to me that if I can "have" another beer, then it's appropriate to say "he can't 'have' water."
Is this just the DL?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johncaveishere

I'm pretty sure that's just the DL. Many of the authors of this course speak English as their second language. In English, at least in my part of the world, we interchange "have" and "drink". Duolingo doesn't necessarily know that though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJFloyd

Gracias.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heshamyoussef

TOMAR = also DRINKING ALCOHOL in Latin America

So can I drink another beer please? As in, I shouldn't get too drunk but I'll ask my wife while being at the bbq n stuff; is correct right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sanmiguel82

Who cares? as long as"you are given" "he/she/they give you" another beer :-) :-) :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paddy01
paddy01
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In English we use "can or able", to mean capable or permitted equally. It seems puedar is interpreted to be more specific. Are there two words to distinguish between capable and permitted in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fendue

Why would the verb not be tener for have?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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"tomar" means "to take", but is used as a replacement for "to have" in sentences where you're talking about drink. French has something similar, with the expression "prendre un pot". You can also say "take a drink" in English of course, but it's not as common. Maybe it's a peculiarity of latin-based languages - I can't speak for Italian or Portugese.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maudbenoit

44 comments and no one asks about using the infinitive tomar. Apparently all infinitives do not work. I goto nothing when I tried "puedo nagar". What's up?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johncaveishere

Nagar is not a Spanish word, that could be your problem there :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaq3n_Hghar

would " puedo tener " be wrong ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Floreen

In most sentences, switching can and I is perfectly acceptable, as it is in English grammar, although it is not commonly said in English, "I can have another beer please?" is perfectly correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lildredre

why tomar in this case? Why not tener if we want to have a more literal translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dremwr
dremwr
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How do you differentiate between wanting another beer as in a different beer and wanting another beer as in wanting the same one again?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
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Una cerveza diferente...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asidin

How would i say this beer tastes bad , can i have an other beer ? As i dont another one , i want to replace it ... una otra ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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This is a point I am concerned with also. Otra (not una in front of it though asidin) cerveza means another beer in sense of different I would think (in a bar one might say "Now I will try another beer") but to order a second (or 3rd, 4th,....!) beer, i.e. a further beer, I have been told (in a Spanish bar) to say " .... una cerveza más" which makes sense to me. Again any native speakers have a comment?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregWoytkiw

Just reporting that "Please, may I have another beer" was wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thetoothfairy

Can you use tener here instead of tomar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NadiaLezcano

I love how one of the other correct choices was "Can i've another beer, please?" >XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DennyEko

How to differentiate 'other' and 'another'? What if I want to ask other beer and not asking for more?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/burtonx22222

mas cerveza is what I would say in Mexico...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cliftonlemon

I thought "tomar" was commonly used to mean "to drink," as in English you might say "taking tea" ...well actually you wouldn't say that today. But Google translate has "tomar" as "to drink", and when I do a reverse- "to drink" comes back as "tomar." So one would never request permission to drink another beer unless you were, like 12, in which case there's an entirely different problem going on! One would request permission to "have" another beer, specifically to have one brought to you for express purposes of imbibing, sî?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevinbeach1

why is it tomar instead of tengo? It seems more logical to ask for having another beer instead of asking to drink another beer...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julia432930

why tomar and not tenir

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/huggzandkisses

im so lost tomar cn mean to have now? why not tener?

And how do you ask for another one? (of the same drink you just had)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sienna.nicholas

Lel no

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahWeir2

Can tomar not also mean to drink? Why does it not work in this sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuridado

can someone please explain why tener is not used here tomar meaning have i dont get it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

Can I drink other kind of beer? Please.... or.... Can I drink another cup of beer? Please.

This is right? .. Another and other is difficult for me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuridado

someone please explain why this is not puedo tener otra cerveza por favor

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redeye011

Tomar (to take) is commonly used as a synonym for beber (to drink). As you know, translations aren't always literally word for word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuridado

i wasent refering to tomar subsituting for beber but more for tomar subsituting for tener have

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomBridge5

shouldn't it be "can i drink another beer please"?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlendaSchulte

Would "Puedo tener" also be correct. I thought tomar meant to take.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Canvasian
Canvasian
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"tomar" means "to take" or "to have" in the sense of "to consume" (similar to "taking medicine" in English). "Tener" does also mean "to have" but not in the sense of "to consume".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanpaulbell

can I've another beer please.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleFenorme

If you have to ask this question, you probably shouldn't have drunk the previous beer.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Canvasian
Canvasian
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La más importante frase en la lengua español!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucalu4
lucalu4
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Soy español y me gustaría saber cual es la diferencia entre usar "have" (can i have another beer, please?) y usar "take" (can i take another beer, please?) en esta frase..¿Tiene que ver con la cortesía o la educación a la hora de pedir algo?

4 months ago