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"Ella maneja su coche."

Translation:She drives her car.

5 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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I wonder if this sentence seems strange to native speakers, given that "manejar" is used almost exclusively in Latin America ("conducir" is preferred in Spain) but "coche" is used mainly in Spain while "carro" or "auto" are more common in Latin America!

From my experience, I would expect to hear/see either "Ella conduce su coche" or "Ella maneja su carro".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

That is my experience as well. But I don't think the computer, when formulating simple sentences, pays much attention to such things. Case in point: Duo's word for sandwich ;)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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Oh, I know. It just struck me as an amusing mix!

I've seen two words for sandwich here-- emparedado and bocadillo. I know "emparedar" is the verb for "to sandwich", but "emparedado" is used for the food item as well, although I think "bocadillo" or simply "sándwich" are more common.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph1496
Joseph1496
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Good question, in Philippines there is close to 1 million Spanish creole based speakers and no we do not find this strange. I guess any Filipino who can speak Tagalog fluently can understand this sentence without translation. What I like about Filipino Spanish words is that you do not need conjugation. Por ejemplo: cepillo, manejo is used for anyone who's driving in Philippines. You don't have to conjugate manejo, manejas, maneja, manejamos, manejan. But to be honest I think more Filipinos should speak Spanish, not only loanwords but real sentences in Spanish. So that the Spanish language is united once again in Europe, the Americas,Africa and Philippines (Asia) Im Filipino and I find any type of Spanish dialect interesting and worth learning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Cool, this is interesting stuff. I do not know much about the Philippines.

Thanks you for the interesting lesson!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyFal1

Do any verbs in Filipino Spanish have to be conjugated?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph1496
Joseph1496
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They are still trying to make Spanish an official language. Queen Sofia- King Juan Carlos of Spain's wife came over to visit in 2012 to discuss the alliance of Philippines and Spain as well as helping to PROMOTE the Spanish language in the country again. Therefore, they are trying to make it an official language like English. Mandarin Chinese is almost there because there are about 1.2 million Chinese Filipinos in Phillippines compared to 2,000-5,000 Spanish Filipinos but they will try. I hope it becomes official. I'd rather speak Spanish over Mandarin Chinese

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph1496
Joseph1496
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you mean "Chavacano language" ? well um, it's Spanish derived but it's easy to understand. The accent and some Tagalog words can make it sound like it's not Spanish and change the meaning of a sentence. Here's a good sentence. Philippine Spanish - Ya mirá yo con José. Spanish: Yo vi a José. Want to see a video? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0phz0PWe4DY and here's a good song, not sure if you'll understand parts of it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb0Cay4L3vk

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oletuv

In Andalucia, Spain (where I live 6 months a year) they use "sándwich" and "bocadillo". I once asked a waitress at the local golf club if she knew the word "emparedado", and she said "never heard of it". :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Has Duo used 'carro' at all? I don't think so but others have mentioned it, perhaps Ceaer you have talked about it before.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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Duo has not used it, I just did a quick search of my vocab and it's not in there. However, they do accept it as an answer. I use and hear Latin American Spanish in my daily life, so "carro" is always the first word that comes into my head for "car" and I usually end up writing that instead of "coche". It's always accepted, but the "another answer is coche" comment box comes up.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

ceaer: There are many possibilities here. I don't know if Duolingo accepts them all: "Ella maneja su carro"/////Ella conduce su carro"///Ella conduce su carro de él"/////Ella maneja su coche de él"///////Ella conduce su carro de ella"//////Ella maneja su coche de ella"/////Ella conduce su carro de ellos"/////Ella maneja su coche de ellos"///// "Ella maneja su carro de ellas"//// and maybe more................but, again, I don't know that Duolingo accepts them all.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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Well, most of those wouldn't be translations of "She drives her car", if you were asked to translate from English-to-Spanish. If it were from Spanish-to-English, you could say "her car", "his car", or "their car" because "su" could mean any of those things.

If you were to say "...carro/coche de él/ella/ellos/ellas", wouldn't you use "el" and not "su"?

Ella maneja/conduce el carro/coche de (whoever)"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Right. I was going from Spanish to English. It wouldn't work the other way around.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geocheslol

Is she driving a hummer yet?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mohammed361550
Mohammed361550
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Muchas gracias.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

I'm curious, when "su" can mean "his, her, your", how do you know in a sentence like this which it is?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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Without context, you don't know. I think most people would assume it's the car of the subject (Ella maneja su carro = She drives her car; Usted maneja su carro = You drive your car) but of course that's not necessarily the case. This sentence could easily also be "She drives his car" or "She drives your car". So when it's not clear from the context, Duolingo should accept all the possible translations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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It accepts "... his car". I have not tried the other ones.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alborghetti

How would you say 'She drives HIS car'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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To emphasis that it is HIS car, you could say "el coche de él" instead of "su coche".

2 years ago

[deactivated user]

    why is su used here when in the previous sentence sus was used ? Both sentences talked about her !!!!!

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
    ceaer
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    Possessives agree with the noun, not with who owns them. That is, if the object is plural, the possessive also becomes plural.

    Ex:

    Her car = su coche

    Her cars = sus coches

    2 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      Had an -s missing. that's what threw me, Thanks !

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Illowther89

      Can it mean control?

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Ceppas
      Ceppas
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      In the sense of «driving» that's American Spanish. In Spanish of Spain «maneja» would be «conduce».

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/david795616

      Conduce su coche...

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Beegee48

      That would be my translation but what they have written, to me means She manages her car!

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/RobInco1

      she manages her car should be accepted. Spanish dictionary translates maneja as manages as well as drives, handles, works, operates and wields. I manage my car and so can she.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
      hud214
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      Yes! "She manages her car." It quite clearly states translate the sentence not interpret the sentence. I don't know what "She manages her car." means. I don't have to know. That's the interpreter's problem. I just translate.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
      ceaer
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      Translate doesn't mean translate literally, it means change something from language A into language B while preserving the sense of the statement.

      I mean, if it said to translate "¿Cómo te llamas?" would you write "How do you call yourself?"

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
      ceaer
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      @hud214, Because that changes the meaning.

      It's necessary = Es necesario

      Es una cosa necesaria = It's a necessary thing / It's something necessary

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
      hud214
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      I just got marked off for translating "Es una cosa necesaria" as "It's necessary."

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Patchwolf

      Yes.

      The meanings behind "How do you call yourself?" and "What is your name?" are extraordinarily similar. They function (as do "¿Cuál es tu nombre?" and the old "What do you call yourself?") as questions which call to identity.

      11 months ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/krisub
      krisub
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      "Ella conduce su coche" is not accepted!

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/RobInco1

      she manages her car should be accepted. Spanish dictionary translates maneja as manages as well as drives, handles, works, operates and wields. I manage my car and so can she.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon756

      I'm kind of mad manage worked on the last questions but it forces you to choose drive in this sentence.

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

      That's an odd thing to be doing with a car!

      Duo could make these sentences a little more interesting without a lot of sweat...

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/JaguarWhisperer

      "Su" is "Her", now?

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
      Blas_de_Lezo00
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      ¡Ay! ¿Quién maneja mi barca, quién?

      ¡Que a la deriva me lleva, quién!

      6 months ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/PatricioJiang

      Why do I want to insist, (to myself), that this is reflexive? "Ella SE maneja su coche" just seems like the correct way to say this. "She herself drives her car". I see She-drives-car, Subject-Verb-Object, and I see a reflexive character to the action. "She drives his car, She drives YOUR car" ... but if it is to be HER car, it must be relexive, no?

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Agent_Gabriel

      Ella maneja su coche.... Si, pero él compró con su dinero.

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/gringaerin
      gringaerin
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      If you were saying "She drives his car" would it be "Ella maneja su coche a el"?

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
      ceaer
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      No. If the context is clear, you can simply say "Ella maneja su coche". Otherwise it would be "Ella maneja el coche de él"

      3 years ago