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"¿Cómo llego a la estación de autobuses?"

Translation:How do I get to the bus station?

5 years ago

115 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

"¿Cómo llego a ...?" looks like a very useful construct to remember.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Karano
_KaranoPlus
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Thanks ! Can you suggest some more such constructs ? That'd be of great help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joeoDrisco

I wouldnt accept how do i get to the station for buses

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liang.li
liang.li
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Yes!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TiaraLaub1

Agree..... how do you get to the bus station? #dumb

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverMartin

Bus stop =/= Bus station???

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shafica

A bus stop is a bench on the road. A bus station is a building .

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P1GG1EP0W3R

Not always.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Splixy

That building is called a subway not a bus station Shafica

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allegory

La parada is a bus stop on the street.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parkertheparker

Pretty much

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charley_s2
charley_s2
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Yeah i thought that too

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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In English books, or English teachers for Spanish speaking students teach them that "¿Cómo llego a la estación?" is "How can I get to the bus station?". Is this more formal or ... anything?. This was not accepted right now by Duo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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The thumb rule of Duolingo: use the most accurate translation unless it is absolutely awful and unnatural.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Hi. I'm not being argumentative, but did you mean "literal" rather than "accurate" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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Being accurate means not adding anything that is not there and not dropping anything that is there. There is no "can" (puedo) in Spanish here, so there is no reason to use it in English. On the contrary, when you do "Verbs: Infinitive", there are tons of "poder" and you translate it as "can", not as "do". It is absolutely different grammar.

Remember you are not translating any real text here, you are just learning. It does not really matter if the sentence is natural or common - you are just learning to use the words and grammar. Of course, word-for-word translations don't work in many cases, as xtempore pointed out. "How I arrive at the station of buses" is incorrect, but "How do I arrive at the bus station" is quite fine (even if you don't usually say "arrive" in this case). English is your native language (or a language you are fluent in), so you don't have to worry much about being natural when translating exercise sentences to English. The main thing is that you understand the Spanish sentence and show your understanding. Another thing to remember may be that the Spanish speaking people use the same word for "get (to the station)" and "arrive (in New York)".

I saw a lot of people here being upset that Duolingo did not accept "lady" instead of "woman",. "toothbrush" instead of "brush" or "él" instead of "el niño". But even if you like "lady" more, you have to know that "mujer" is a direct equivalent of "woman". You also have to know that "el niño" means "the boy". That's the purpose of learning. Also, keep in mind that Duolingo is a program that accepts only translations that are in the database. Why risk stepping aside from the most obvious translation?

Yes, sometimes Duolingo accepts less accurate translations, maybe because they were repeatedly suggested and the experts gave in and just added them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

In all the examples you give above, I agree with you. So, if these examples convey your idea correctly, then yes, I guess "accurate" is the best description.

And, yes, I agree that this is a shame: Yes, sometimes Duolingo accepts less accurate translations, maybe because they were repeatedly suggested and the experts gave in and just added them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Olimo- I agreee so much with you, that's what I try to explain sometimes but I can't find the words. I hope it will help people.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Oh I agree so much with you guys! These discussions can be so very helpful and illuminating and I am so grateful, but so much is taken up by people who seem to be linguistic psychopaths....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csillagdora

Your explanation is very interresting, I understood a lot! Anyway personally english is not my mother language,I have beel learning it for a lot of years, but still my way of thinking is hungarian..If I translate to english what I woud say in hungarian in a common situation was this: "How CAN I..get..". ..so, I just want to say, learning and understaing languages depends on which is our first language :) as language shows your way of thinking..that makes learning so deverse! And that's cool! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morne
Morne
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But why is "do" more appropriate than "can"? I don't think either are literal, but both are fairly natural English. There is no poder but no hacer either.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpelle27
kpelle27
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"Do" is the default way of asking questions in English when there is no other modal verb, just as subject-verb inversion is the default way of asking questions in Spanish (when the subject is specified, as in "Como llegan los hombres a la estacion de autobuses?") See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do-support

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Hacer does not mean 'do' as used here. Do is there because of English conventions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cocacola321

Excellent explanation! Ahem. Do you work for DL by any chance?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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Well, in a way - I am a moderator :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeMinogue

Olimo. Good response. Well said, and a positive note with regards to what is acceptable or not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylrrDean

Not to split hairs but what you're describing is the definition of literal. (Unless you mean accuracy of literality then you could say accuracy) Sometimes a literal translation is inaccurate. Think about translating colloquialisms and idioms. It would be far from accurate in meaning to translate many of these literally. (Please forgive any typos, I'm typing on glass here) Also, I'm just saying, not trying to start something :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Splixy

How do you slant or bold letter and words?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krile1
Krile1
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I wrote "arrive" and it marked me wrong...

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

I think I know what olimo means, but I'm not sure "literal" or "accurate" quite capture it. I would say go for the most obvious translation (or perhaps the most concise).

Translating literally word-for-word will often be wrong. "How I arrive at the station of buses?" is horrible. We'd never say it like that, but it still captures the essence of the question, which one then adjusts for a more obvious English construction of "How do I get to the bus station?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

oh, I agree, I don't think literal is the way to go and I didn't mean to imply that ... I was trying to get at what olimo meant by "accurate" ... but maybe that's what you were saying, too ... I think I understand the idea you're conveying (xtempore), but I'm at a loss as to how to express it ...

DL sometimes accepts a translation that (almost) doesn't use any of the words in the original sentence because it's the same idea. Other times, it only accepts (almost) the literal (word for word) translation. And sometimes it accepts both because we complain. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metatard

I think "simple" belongs here somewhere. The simplest of the accurate possibilities?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P1GG1EP0W3R

If so-don't follow the rules!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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"How can I get..." is now accepted!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

The use of "can" sounds odd to me. I suppose I would understand what someone meant, but being a bit of a smart-ass, I might say "You can walk". "Can" implies the ability to do something, and is much the same as "poder" in Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

Disagree here; "can" asks what are the possible ways (routes and transport) to the station. "Can I get to the station" might invite a yes or no answer, but "how can I..." is perfectly clear AND perfectly good English (and it's what I answered).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ernestd

I agree with you. Adding 'can' here would be to make it natural in English the way it was meant in the Spanish version.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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The goal of translating from English to Spanish in exercises is not to produce a natural translation, but to prove that you understand the Spanish version well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smallquanni
smallquanni
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How do I arrive at the bus station? - marked wrong. I think it is OK but just less used.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

That doesn't really make much sense, ar at least it doesn't have the same meaning.

How do I get to the bus station? Go down Main St and turn right.

How do I arrive at the bus station? Tired and dishevelled.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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That in Spanish could mean either in English. Furthermore, it can be about the means of transport too.

¿Cómo llego a la estación?
- Cansado y despeinado
- Por la calle 1 y giro a la derecha
- Caminando, en taxi, etc. (Walking, by taxi, etc.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashi97

Wow!! Good examples.. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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It is accepted now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

Don't think a native English speaker would say this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naomilhs

It doesnt let me say "How do you get to the bus station?". I know it's not the literal translation, because you is not in the sentence, but that is how you would say it in English. Other times on Duo they accept the more common english version of a sentence even though it is not what was literally said in spanish. Duo has a lot of inconsistencies.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Sorry naomilhs but your mistake is somewhere else. The question is about YO/I and not YOU.It has nothing to do with a common version but with the fact that you're using the wrong pronoun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maria.mcna

I write the same thing. Duolingo counted it as incorrect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Why is it not "de los autobuses", as opposed to "de autobuses"? Or are both valid?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockinAbs

Shouldn't "how do you get to the bus station" work? When I want to know how to get somewhere, that's what I ask...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ciarantu

By the sounds of it this is different in different english speaking countries, but in Australian English we would never say bus station, it would always be bus stop regardless of if it was a bench by the side of a road or a larger building.

To us a station is something specifically for trains.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metatard

Could you provide the phrasing an Australian would use to ask how to get to the "bus station"? How would I ask to get to the central/primary/hub/biggest bus stop where the busses sleep?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hassansen
hassansen
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"How to get to the bus station" isn't right too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

That's fine for entering as a search term in your web browser because you don't have to follow grammar rules there. But to ask these sorts of things, English usually requires a modal verb or the word 'do'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mike.c.35

Yes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phlippieskezer

I keep hearing "Cómo juego a la estación de autobúses" and get confused

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bertha.lit

How am I going to the bus station sounds right to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

That's a strange sounding sentence to me and a different verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KoreLiz

Why is it a la estacion?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Why wouldn't it be? That's literally “to the station".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditya24

Why is 'How do I come to the bus station?' marked wrong here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Because "come" refers to an inwards direction relative to the speaker. You would not use "come" in this context, because that would imply you (the speaker) are at the location in question - and therefore the question makes no sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditya24

Although I'm sure I've heard 'come' used in this context, your explanation makes sense. The question does seem fairly nonsensical. I'm going to chalk the usage off as slang. Gracias!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metatard

At first I was going to write, "how do you get...". Then I leaned more conservatively with the pronoun-neutral, "how does one get...". But then I noticed the "llego" conjugation. Although the first expression is the most common colloquially, it's directly at odds with llego. SO, does the "cómo llego a" construction always mean "how do I get to... ", or is it a general idiom for asking directions? I hope that makes sense... Ultimately I chose the simplest translation, "how do I get...", which fortunately rolls off the tongue smoothly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Treecie

I wrote how do I get to the bus stations? This was marked wrong. Is "estacion de autobus" wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

estación is singular, so "station" in English. As for "bus": In English we can shove two nouns together and use one like an adjective ("dog house" etc.) but in Spanish (and many languages), we can't do that. So, it's a station for more than one bus: estación de autobuses.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

In English, when two nouns are shoved together to make a longer noun, the new noun that results has the adjective meaning incorporated into the noun. It is not considered an adjective-noun word, it is considered a compound noun (noun made up of two words that were previously considered two separate parts of speech, even though they were two nouns (e.g., "tree house" became "treehouse," "copyright" became "copy right," etc.) This process is interesting, because people's usage drives the change. Every time a dictionary is reissued, its editors and publishers scour all the books and publications they can find, looking for new words, compounds, and phrasing that has been used extensively since the last publication of the dictionary. It is my understanding that dictionaries are edited on an average of every ten years.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

would just autobus work here or does it have to be plural?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

I think that in all the languages, a bus station has many buses , not only one, so it must be plural

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Super. That makes sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

The busses station can refer to a particular station that a particular bus is going to vs. the bus station refering to the station with busses.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metatard

I'm sure constructions like "the busses station" are never good in English. (Perhaps "the bus's station" could be used in a sentence, but it would sound weird and clumsy.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

thx for catching the auto correct possessive version of an android 2.2 that turns out needed a smart pill injection and is just as archaic as the spelling of buss. I recon the weird and clumsiness would be a little dependent on which parts there of the states you were in. Although it is possible in my days I heard far too many generational versions weirdness seems to be bout the norm, least round here these parts. Lingot for the major, cheers...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moramajama

Does autobus have to be plural in this case, in common use?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

NORMALLY THERRE ARE MORE THAN A BUS IN A BUS STATION.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

is more than one, or are more than one....is, methinks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreyCha

Why is 'a' used here? I thought it is used to point out a person (i.e. a la primera persona)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

andrey- you talk about personal A here. A can also be used for movement. Vamos a la playa, for exemple, let's go to the beach.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mike.c.35

A means "to"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schneckenwalzer
Schneckenwalzer
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Thanks for clearing that!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/albkpkr

Okay... In a previous multiple choice exercise, selecting "Cómo leego a la estacion de autobuses" was incorrect for "How do I get to the bus station." So why does it work here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schneckenwalzer
Schneckenwalzer
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Did you really write "leego"? Than it was incorrect spelling I suppose

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

Why is bus plural but singular in translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Because it's 'bus station' in English (why? There are usually more than one) but in Spanish it is the station of the buses. The English version describes a general mode of transportation (bus, train...) and the singular is used, but the Spanish version is literal. It is the station the buses go to.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken.goodwi

i like your reasoning with this...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ajray-
Ajray-
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Why is "how do i get to the bus station" right but "How do I arrive to the bus station" wrong? Is my english the issue here =p?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Yes, your English is the issue. You can "get to" somewhere, or "arrive at/in" somewhere, but you cannot "arrive to" somewhere.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ajray-
Ajray-
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;( Oh, well thanks. That's brand new information to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metatard

You could ask "how do I arrive at the bus station?", and it might be understood and answered, but it's not the best way to ask in the USA.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mike.c.35

What's the difference between venir and llegar? please answer! thank you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdunCitadel

Basic english, future tense should be introduced way earliee in this app

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evavrina

Why cannot the answer be "How do I arrive to the bus station?" Seems the same as the given answers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Margaret_Kirk

Another useful phrase to put into the back of my jotter - thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deliaofmontesano

How do i call the bus station

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobbiePadi
RobbiePadi
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I said "travel" instead of "get" and I was wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinWilt

Wait so autobus is bus and autobuses is bus station?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fiigueroa64
Fiigueroa64
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why it can't to use "How does it gets to the bus station"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelAust3

I was just curious as to why there is no accent over the u in autobuses? When it is singular there is an accent so I figured there would be an accent over the plural form as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CARLOSDANG130097

by bus I assume...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DGamser

At first, my translation "How do I arrive to the bus terminal?" was refused whereby both "to" and "terminal" were marked as wrong. Why not "to", and why not "bus terminal"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricDoz
EricDoz
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Por bus.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexom

al estacion isn't the same as a la estacion? I had al estacion and was counted wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

because al is the contraction for a el. There's no contraction for a la.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duzuru

i do not like

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4SMD
4SMD
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Bus stop...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/burgerburglar

My Spanish teacher taught me that we do not use "estacion de autobus", but "parada de autobus".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

burgerburglar: Your teacher was wrong. "estación de autobuses" = bus station..........................."parada de autobuses" = bus stop

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I would imagine it depends on the context. In my city, we have bus stops for the city buses, but we have a bus station for the inter-city (long distance, not commuter) buses.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

burgerburglar- If I take the bus in Montrel to go to work, it will be la parada, but if I go on an organised trip, I have to go to the estación, because that kind of bus, doesn't have stops, they go thru the destination of the trip, ans everybody must be at the station to get on the bus.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

burger- parada and estación are 2 different words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shafica

See above

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowan32

Parden

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merababengam

i used " how do i go to the station by bus?" and it says wrong. Why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

You ask the question: you want to know how to get to the station and in the same sentence, you answered by bus. The fact is that you want to know how getting to the BUS STATION, AND NOT GOING BY BUS.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowan32

blah dee blah de blah blahh blahh blah blah good advice right

4 years ago