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  5. "Har du tid?"

"Har du tid?"

Translation:Do you have time?

December 6, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jayna_Johns

To clarify, this is basically asking if you "have time" to do something, right? It's not asking if you have 'the' time (i.e. what time is it?)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhblake

Exactly.

If you want to ask about what time it is (right now) you'd usually say "Vad är klockan?" (literally "What's the clock?").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lord_zulo

One would ask "Har du tiden - Do you have the time" in such cases as someone is waiting for potatoes to cook etc. Time will then be of a specific time in mind.

In this case time is more general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Astronomy487

I don't have any time, I'm on Duolingo! :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaghdhaEire

Maybe it's just Hiberno-English, but "Have you time?" Is valid here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

Duolingo uses American English. Do you have time would be the most common way of saying it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

"Have you time?" is also an accepted translation here, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

Thanks devalanteriel, that's good to know.

I will add here that for those who want to speak American English, Do you have time is more common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theredcebuano

att lysna på mig gnälla


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ_Schweiss

Why not "Hinner du?" (Do you have enough time?) Is there really a difference between that and "Har du tid"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

Hinner du? is more ’Will you make it in time?’ and har du tid? is ’do you have time?’


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rick201812

I'm surprised that it does not accept "have you got time"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birdfeets

i am a bit confused because in english "time" and "the time" are interchangable. couldn't one ask if you had the time for something, as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan-Olav

I'd say it's the same in both cases: Har du tid att hjälpa mig? (Do you have time to help me?) and Har du tid för ett samtal? (Do you have the time for a conversation?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myriam365

Wouldn't it be 'Do you have any time?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

There's no någon ("any") in the Swedish phrase, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelicGirl2

what would: "do you have the time?" be? as in ; what time is it?

har du tiden or something? or is it an expression you cant use in swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That would be Vad är klockan?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

What about Hur mycket är klockan?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Sure, that also works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChoYume

Would "do you have time for me?" be "har du tid för mig?" ? Tack för svarar!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, that works well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlackboardIdeas

So, if I understood it correctly, tid in tidning is like time in Times, e.g. New York Times?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, it's basically the same word as English "tidings". The original meaning was e.g. "happening", and this developed into different meanings in different Germanic languages.

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