"De lever i arton år."

Translation:They live for eighteen years.

December 7, 2014

18 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

I thought 'eighteen' is aderton.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Aderton is an old form of this word, now only used in one context: De aderton means the 18 members of the Swedish Academy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjolahoppsansaa

Finlandssvenskor säger alltid "aderton".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rami59

Why is för not used here? Since when does i mean for? Tack


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan600886

At least it isn't ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethanxman

Is there a difference between lever and bor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Roughly, lever means is alive, bor means resides.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/photodiarist

So would this be a reference to a species with an expected lifespan? Or should this somehow refer to humans?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anrui
Mod
  • 16

I would guess that it is about some sort of plant or animal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olesja386275

I understood as "they live in 80s".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjolahoppsansaa

Arton och åttio är ganska långt ifrån varandra.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexbfree

This is a weird sentence in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LubomrVrna

Present perfect should be used here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anrui
Mod
  • 16

No, then it would be a completely different sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LubomrVrna

OK, now I see the difference, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CedSgm7N

I've never seen the word "lever" used this way before so I'd like to clarify it's use. The above English translation is really awkward. In English we would say, "I've been alive for 18 years" or .... more commonly, "I'm 18 years old." The only appropriate way to use the phrase "They live for 18 years" would be if one is talking about a particular lifespan such as that of an animal (e.g. dogs usually live for 16 years) or a specific type of person (someone with brain cancer may only live for another 3 years).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anrui
Mod
  • 16

I think you have misunderstood the meaning of the sentence. The Swedish sentence means exactly what you say the English sentence means. It could be about a plant or an animal. The Swedish sentence certainly does not mean that someone has been alive for 18 years or that someone is 18 years old.

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