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"Tá fáilte romhaibh."

Translation:You are welcome.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ueueueueue
ueueueueue
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Literally, "welcome is before you"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yep.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/songoftheskies

Is there a (somewhat) comprehensive list on what nouns are on/before/with someone? Or do we pick them up one by one?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I posted a list a while ago about what nouns go with what prepositions. It's by no means comprehensive, but a good start

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/songoftheskies

I'm glad to hear it. Is this list in the forums?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes, but it's pretty far back. I wish Duolingo offered an easy way to search.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn855094

You could think of it as "you are welcome before me".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

You really shouldn't - aside from the ambiguity in English (does it mean that you'll be welcome if you arrive before I do, but you won't if you're late), the Irish for "before me" is romham, and romhaibh only means "before you" (or "before you all" or "before you guys" or "before yiz" or however your spoken dialect of English differentiates between plural and singular "you").

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylart2007

Would this be used an an answer for when someone thanks you, or more in the sense of "You are welcome to my house"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Since this is the plural “you”, it would be used either as a response to when multiple people thank you or to welcome multiple people to your house.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnClayborn
JohnClayborn
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I think its the plural if the first part "youre welcone" as a reply. For singular it would be ta failte roimhat

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ciaratiara

http://forvo.com/search/romhaibh/

So difficult to hear the quiet voice at farvo site.. even at full volume.. Could a suggestion for pronunciation of romhaibh be made. Go raibh maith agat!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukeebyrnee

"row-uv" -- "row" as in to row a boat, and "uv" as in the "ov" in "oven"! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ciaratiara

Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fitzo1
fitzo1
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Ah here! Why would you put in the pl. sign, which i assume means plural. And i know it's a plural "you", so why disallow the pl. in my answer? I feel set up for a fall!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The “(pl.)” is in grey text, while the rest of the hint is in black text; think of the black text as what is expected in an answer, and think of the grey text as a clarification of the meaning of the black text.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kmradley
kmradley
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"You are all welcome"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randybvain
Randybvain
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Does romhaibh mean you? Could I say Tá beag romhaibh meaning You are small?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Irish combines prepositions (like "roimh") and pronouns (like "sibh"), so "romhaibh" is a "prepositional pronoun" meaning "before you".

"tá beag romhaibh" means "there is a small amount before you", where "beag" is a noun. ("small" is an adjective, not a noun in "you are small", which is "tá tú beag").

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyAnn11

Could someone clue me the difference in the sounding of roimh and romhaibh

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

You can hear "roimh" pronounced in these exercises:
"Tá arán roimh an gcaife" https://www.duolingo.com/comment/14506180
"Ithim roimh an bportán" https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4590440

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MechamRachel

why can you say 'you are welcome' when in the last question you have to say 'the sandwich is in front of him, rather than 'he has a sandwich?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

In real life, in circumstances where English speakers say "you are welcome", Irish speakers say tá fáilte romhaibh (or romhat). English speakers don't say "a welcome is before you" so it makes a lot more sense to learn that tá fáilte romhat means "you are welcome". (That's not a Duolingo decision - just about every Irish language course or teacher will teach you that tá fáilte romhat means "you are welcome").

Tá an ceapaire roimhe simply doesn't mean "he has the sandwich"
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/8725617/

7 months ago