"A siblíní agus a shiblíní."

Translation:Her siblings and his siblings.

3 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/georgeoftruth
georgeoftruth
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Good exercise. I always mix up which possessive gets a lenition.

So "his" gets it when the word starts with a consonant, but it doesn't if the word starts with a vowel? Vice versa for "her"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes, a (“his”) lenites the governed noun, and a (“her”) prefixes an H to a governed noun beginning with a vowel. Note that the latter case is not an example of lenition, since only certain consonants can be lenited.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntAlbanach

Finally lenition and eclipsis start to make sense!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Magh-Roith

would their siblings be " a siblíní "?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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That's the correct lention pattern

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nwshredder2406

Ugh I'm confused. I understand lenition for genitive cases, but how the heck do you tell the difference between that and lenition after vowels?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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I'm not sure what you're asking.

There's only one genitive case in Irish, and the only genitive there is that masculine singular nouns are lenited after the definite article. Did you mean something else?

There are no vowels that cause lenition just because they're vowels.

The three 'a''s above are the Irish words for his, her, and their. a bhád (his boat - lenited), a bád (her boat - nothing happens, but if the noun had started with a vowel, it would add an h to the beginning: a hathair), a mbád (their boat - eclipsed)

I have a feeling that this isn't what you were asking, though. If you give some examples, I'll try again to answer your question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza
JoaoDSouza
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Agus a tsiblíní

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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What would this mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza
JoaoDSouza
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Their siblings

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Oh, I see. No, in standard Irish, urú does nothing to a word starting with 's.' A sibliní = their siblings

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza
JoaoDSouza
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The last time I checked, it affricated the s.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Interesting. Would you mind telling me where you checked this and whether your source was describing a particular dialect?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza
JoaoDSouza
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I'll recheck

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza
JoaoDSouza
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I just checked. It's not urú. It is another unnamed mutation that only happens to feminine nouns after the definite article which is preceded by a preposition.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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It's called a t-prothesis, and It's a little more complicated than that. Look here http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/thnd.htm#t for more info

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilverPill

Why does it sound like she's saying "a hiblíní"? A mistake? A rule I missed? A peculiarity in the Connacht dialect or Irish in general?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Because sh sounds like h

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel334210

So if the word starts with a constant her doesnt get a séimhiú (h) but his does and if the word strarts with a vowel her starts with h and his doesnt?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Typo: consonant (bcdfglmnprst) Yes, and you want to say their something, you eclipse (put urú on) the first letter of the next word.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeirdreBan1

Thats exactly as i translated the sentence

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/a-mcgo1

his = a

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Yes, and her = a and their = a

Did you have a question?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/a-mcgo1

NO THANKS

1 year ago
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