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"¿Necesito poner la mesa?"

Translation:Do I need to set the table?

3 years ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

Duo gives as a correct answer "Do I need to place the table" but marked "Do I need to lay the table" as wrong - seriously?? I know there's another discussion thread on this but I've reported this one as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

In English, "Do I need to place the table?" means that you are part of a crew who are moving furniture around and that you need to know where to set the table down. I'm curious what you reported about this because Duo's answer of "Do I need to set the table" is what I've always said myself and heard from everyone around me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P1GG1EP0W3R

Duo says "Do I need to make a table" on mine......................

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Czxherr_0236

Ok Duolingo needs to get it together.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aumbria

Is duolingo threatining us?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pheonixstrike

If yes, i am reporting the police.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffreyCam13

My answer was, Is it necessary to set the table? I was marked incorrect. I don't believe I'm incorrect. Explain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

¿Es necesaria poner la mesa?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Yours is a connotative translation, rather than a literal one. As Ann.Ahin writes below, you need to use "necesito" because it includes the pronoun "I."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ann.Ahin
Ann.AhinPlus
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your answer does not reference myself... Do I need to set the table?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Polyglottiana

Is "poner la mesa" a phrase/idiom or is it just an isolated use of the word "poner"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/levylois

poner means to put, to place, to set so just one of the uses of poner

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olgaz007

According to the WordReference "poner la mesa" is a "locución verbal", so yes, it's a phrase/collocation

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

From an English speaker's viewpoint, it is colloquial Spanish because English speakers do not use the word "(to) put/(to) place/(to) set (down)/poner" when they speak of "setting the table." From a Spanish speaker's viewpoint, "to set the table" is colloquial English. The common thread is the idea that dishes and cutlery are put on the table by someone.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Racquel415378

In California we say "Do I need to set the table?" Why was this marked incorrect?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Betty_C
Betty_C
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I don't know. My answer was the same and was marked as being correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saber.sh

Mine too

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogueArt

Why is it "Do I need to set the table" vs "I need to set the table?". Would both be correct if a Spanish speaker asked you to translate to someone else?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The first one is a standard English question, the second sound like you put emphasis on "I", so in that case I would include yo in the Spanish translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThUit
ThUit
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How do I translate "Is it necessary to set the table ?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I think that would be "¿Es necesario poner la mesa?".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deelilah
deelilah
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Why is 'is it necessary to set the table?' not correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

Didn't you look at previous replies? "Do I need to" and "Is it necessary" are completely different verb constructions in both English and Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ms.Reed
Ms.Reed
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Why is "Should I set the table?" wrong? It is the same meaning. "Must I" sounds like the person speaking really does not want to set the table. I think in Spanish this is not the same.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenuelX

"Should I" is probably wrong because it has another verb in Spanish (deber).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelissaResnick

Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenuelX

De nada

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The verbs "should," and "ought" are interchangeable in English, and both connote obligation. The verb "owe" also connotes obligation. The present participle of "owe" is "owing," and the past participle of "owe" is "ought." "Ought" is sometimes termed a defective verb because it omits the helping verb "had," so that a sentence like "Debo hacerlo pronto" translates to "I ought to do it soon," rather than translating to "I had ought to do it soon." The latter sentence is considered archaic English, but its Spanish translation is not archaic Spanish.

"Deber" translates word for word as "to must." "To must" is incorrect English. Instead, the English closest to the meaning of "to must" is "should" and/or "ought to." They ARE slightly different in meaning, given that "must" indicates that the obligation is obligatory, while both "ought to" and "should" indicate that the obligation is undertaken voluntarily.

Because ¿Necesito poner la mesa?" uses the word "need, which can have either a compulsory or a voluntary slant of meaning, I think that the use of the "deber" is probably a good connotative translation. However, just by asking the question with the modal verb "do" ( Do I need to _?) the slant is the same and the translation is more literal.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenuelX

I see.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmberjackCZ
AmberjackCZ
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The sentence "Do I need to set up the table?" is incorrect? Is the "up" changing the meaning so significantly? I am not a native speaker of English nor Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryAndre1
AveryAndre1
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"Set up the table" would mean that the table is perhaps a folding table, or one that has to be assembled, and you to whatever needs to be done to make it useable as a table. Whereas "set the table" means putting the plates etc onto it ready for eating. I'm pretty sure that 'poner' has the latter meaning in this context (native English, only learning Spanish, tho I registered myself as 'Speaking Spanish' in order to get access to Catalan).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmberjackCZ
AmberjackCZ
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So better usage of "set up" would be for instance "set up the chessboard", I guess?

But anyway, thank you immensely.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angry_Mongoose

HAHAHA This sounds like my youngest cousin! "I need to set the table? (a lot of sassyness on the I) Make Owen do it."

I do not mean to be rude to her or anyone else. Idk why I said everyone else, you shouldn't get offended.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronaldgarb1

what about " Do I need to make the table" That was marked wrong also .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenjaminBl12

Why does this sentence not require a "que" before poner like some other verbs? Im confused by the fact that sometimes "to [verb]" is "que [inf]" and sometimes it's simply "[inf]"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Could it be that the word que/that is introducing a subjunctive? I don't think that this sentence falls into any of the Weirdo stipulations.

See: http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/COURSES/WEIRDO.HTM

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryAndre1
AveryAndre1
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I think that 'do I have to set the table' should as be accepted, since the meaning is almost that same as 'need', and there is no reason to believe that any subtle difference that exists is paralled by one between necesitar and tener que.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You are absolutely right as far as being understood by others, which after all is the point. However, Duolingo is literal because it's a computer program. Besides, it's good to learn the precise way so that you can make subtle distinctions when necessary. Just think of what fun it will be when you can draw them in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryAndre1
AveryAndre1
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The answers that are accepted are whatever the course developers say should be, and they do often revise them, although there seem to be problems for some courses at least of changes made to the lessons getting through to the 'duobot' that does the strengthening exercises (the Greeks at any rate seem to be having problems with this). What these necessity words precisely mean in their languages is a topic that could probably use quite a bit of exploration, since it is unlikely that there are precise equivalents, just overlapping meanings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I respectfully wanted to add: "necessity" is the noun, and "necessary" is the adjective. I believe you meant the sentence to be, "What these necessary words precisely mean in their language ... "

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryAndre1
AveryAndre1
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No, actually, I do mean 'necessity words', that is, words whose meaning involves some kind of necessity. Although that was maybe not super clear from what I wrote

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Aha! After your explanation, the phrase "necessity words" has an entirely different shade of meaning.

"Harper's English Grammar" separates all English words into two groups: "function words" and "vocabulary words." Function words (prepositions, pronouns, articles, and conjunctions) provide syntactical structure. All the other parts of speech–nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives–the book defines as "vocabulary words."

Using the term "function words" (which I believe correspond to "necessity words"), I think I grasped your point: In their infancy, all native speakers learn the colloquialisms that make their languages unique, especially how their language's function words work together. If I understood you correctly, you were saying that the best contribution Duo's users can make is to keep pointing out how their mother tongue uses its function words. ; ^)

¡Ah! Después de su explicación, la frase "palabras de necesidad" tiene un matiz completamente diferente de significado.

"Harper's English Grammar" separa todas las palabras en inglés en dos grupos: "palabras de función" y "palabras de vocabulario". Las palabras funcionales (preposiciones, pronombres, artículos y conjunciones) proporcionan una estructura sintáctica. Todas las otras partes del discurso-sustantivos, verbos, adverbios y adjetivos-el libro define como "palabras de vocabulario".

Usando el término "palabras funcionales" (que creo que corresponden a "palabras de necesidad"), creo que comprendí su punto: En su infancia, todos los hablantes nativos aprenden los coloquialismos que hacen que sus lenguajes sean únicos, especialmente cómo funcionan las palabras funcionales de su lenguaje . Si te entendía bien, decía usted que la mejor contribución que los usuarios de Duo pueden hacer es seguir señalando cómo su lengua materna usa sus palabras funcionales. ; ^)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtsyWolf

... said the whiny, lazy child.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pelota19

I am not sure what is meant here by Doulingo concerning its alternative translations of "placing or laying the table". Definitely "to set the table" would be to place the plates, knifes, forks on the table in preparation for a meal.

However, "to place the table" would be moving the table itself somewhere, as a piece of furniture. For instance, "the movers placed the table in the dining room". And you might say to someone moving the table as a piece of furniture: "Just set the table down here." Which also would mean moving the table itself.

In addition, I have never heard of "laying a table", although "a person can lay an object on a table."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marco681937

Isn't it better "do I have to..." ?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Although "have to" and "need to" are pretty interchangeable, it's a less direct translation:

  • sb. needs to do something - alguien necesita hacer algo
  • sb. has to do something - alguien tiene que hacer algo
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ricci564373

The green owl strikes again, all destined to confuse and confound. It's a question! And yes Paulalock et al, in English we would say 'shall I set the table?' or 'Lay the table'. But we must remember, in fairness to that cheeky little green owl, much of language is colloquial and no matter how they try at Duo there will always be a few like this. I'm just happy that there is a green owl there to help me learn.

6 months ago