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"Ólann an luch uisce roimh an damhán alla."

Translation:The mouse drinks water before the spider.

December 8, 2014

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaran201

This sounds like some sorta spy code. "The mouse is drinking the water, engage the spider!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Ixnæ on the yspæ alktæ! Yes, I have no bananas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FordhamRam95

What does "damhán alla" mean? Why is spider two words? Knowing the two parts might help me remember this word. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Old Irish damh = ox, alla or allta = wild, undomesticated. Damhán alla = little wild ox. No worse that mac tire for wolf of smugairle róin for jellyfish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EannaConnolly

A way to remember is Alla sounds like Balla (forgive my spelling) which means wall and Damhán sounds like down so down wall. Because spiders go up and down walls.

I just made that up noe Im only here because I wanna help people lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexMoby

Just like the fox "sionnach", there is no ellipsis for the spider "damhan alla" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/discoletsgo

the preposition+definite article combo doesn't eclipse words starting with d and t. roimh an (before the) is one of those combos. i remember not to eclipse it because of the "an n-" you end up getting. example: "roimh an damhán alla" is correct. if you were to say "roimh an ndamhán alla" you would end up pronouncing "an na..." and it'd run together in a weird way that that feels like i'm just blowing out my nose haha. this might be the reason it's not eclipsed or it might be just a coincidence but either way it helps me remember.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kjcrosby

Thank you for this - I was trying to figure out why damhan alla wasn't eclipsed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chipcavcosta

Not sure how old this comment thread is, but D and T would absolutely be eclipsed in Munster! That's definitely how I was taught in school, to say "ag an ndoras" or "ar an dtraein", but I know other dialects don't do that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkAdams211319

That's where my ancestors came from, so when I go to an Gaeltacht in Munster, I'll have to remember this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giovanni-B

I wrote "the Mouse drinks water in front of the spider" it wasn't accepted. Before, in front of, and ahead of are similar, so what's the deal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petermarti682580

It was a very mannerly spider. He just said to the mouse 'mice before spiders '!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jperry1066

it was accepted on 10 June 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poxadas

"Roimh" meaning "before": does this mean before in terms of time (i.e. the mouse drank, and then the spider drank) or in terms of space (i.e. the mouse drank in the presence of the spider)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Yes, roimh means before in terms of time and in terms of space.

https://www.teanglann.ie/ga/fgb/roimh
An bia a cuireadh romhainn - "the food which was set before us", Romham amach - "out, right, in front of me"
roimh an Nollaig - "before Christmas". roimh a seacht a chlog - "before seven o’clock", roimh Chríost, R. Ch. - "before Christ, B.C."

There is a twist, though - you don't use roimh before a verb, so to say "before he drank it", it's sular ól sé é.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/websmasha

When I started Irish, some helpful Duolingoer helped others to learn Irish. Somebody, please call that Duolingoer and make me learn damhán alla!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antimaterie.

I wrote "... in front of the spider" & it was wrong. Can anybody explain why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ridden4

Does anyone have a link or video explaining why some words don't have eclipse? Thank you so much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colin236326

"The water rat* drinks before the spider ?" * [or water mouse] - isn't this an alternative correct translation?

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