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  5. "Vi har time nu."

"Vi har time nu."

Translation:We have class now.

December 8, 2014

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RikSha

There is a difference between the 'turtle' pronunciation and the normal speed translation of 'time', which one is correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synryo

Good guesses, the slow option is correct :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kongen

I can only listen to the normal speed, but in that time is pronounced wrong. The i in time should sound more like the english word tea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

That was my question too :). I am almost sure that the slow one is correct. I suppose it is the same "time" that means hour ("timma" in Swedish) and then the turtle must be the right one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cenlei

So when would you use 'time' for class instead of 'klasse'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielm90

I asked my Danish girlfriend this a while ago, and, if I remember her reply correctly, 'time' is class, as in lecture ('I'm going to class now'), and 'klasse' is class, as in subject ('which classes do you take?'). I think it's partly because classes (lectures) in Denmark are invariably an hour (en time) long.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomseLauge

Actually a class is usually 45 mins in Danish schools (Or at least it was before they changed the system this year. Now I don't know)

Time refers to class as in "I'm going to class" Fag refers to subject Klasse refers to grade as in "I'm in the 9th grade" "Jeg går i 9. klasse", as well as classroom Karakter is grade Forelæsning is lecture

Hope I could clear it up a bit :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenCarlsson

Thanks! "Fag" and "Karakter" both sound very odd to a Swede :), but the other ones are similar to Swedish words (timma, klass and föreläsning).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomseLauge

Whenever I read Swedish I find it so amusing because I'm constantly going "hey we have that too!" haha :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ycUvuSap

Is "We have lesson now." good English? I would have thought it to be either "a lesson" or "lessons".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

Your intuition is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

Klasse also means the classmates, as in 'klassefest'. In school, from børnehaveklasse through 3. G (HS seniors) kids stay with the members of their class, ususally numbered, as in 2b, which means 2nd grade, or 2nd year Gymnasium, the b class. Often they will stay in the b class all through school, and get to know their classmates very well. In gymnasium (at least 20 years ago) a,b,c.... are Sproglige klasser, and ...xyz Matematiske.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelNiGut

My husband is danish and he didn't understand the audio. The pronunciation is not accurate at all. It must be pronounced regarding the Danish Alphabet pronunciation.!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GigiGottwald

What's wrong with "We now have class"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

There are some word order rules that linguists have discovered, which you can see here.
Now we have class/Now we'll have class (after celebrating someone's birthday, for example), is being emphatic, so in an unusual position. For Time, the most neutral position is at the end: We have class now.
But, I think this works:
We now have class outside (because the classroom is being repaired, or the weather is perfect.)
I guess it might be classified as Frequency in this sentence.
I read recently that someone has also found a rule for the order of English adjectives
When I taught English in Danish gymnasium, I was very glad that I'd learned English as a baby and was the teacher, not the learner. Rules like these just come naturally for a native speaker. It took scientists (linguists) to figure them out. Thanks for giving me an opportunity to research it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GigiGottwald

Thank you for your explanation and the useful link, Bonbayel. Here's a lingot for you.

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