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"Has vivido en esta casa por muchos años."

Translation:You have lived in this house for many years.

3 years ago

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BobTallyHo

Most of this lesson takes 'had'...he had already gone, you had, I had, etc. Why does only this example take 'have'? Maybe I need to study PPerfect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Yes, that would be past perfect: "(Tú) habías vivido en esta casa por muchos años." The sentence should be in present perfect: "(Tú) has."

This is the Past Perfect skill, so I'm not sure why this present perfect sentence is here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psyne0
psyne0
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I was confused about a present perfect in this unit, but maybe the point was to show us that "You have done something for X years" (which includes the past but continuing now) is different than "You had done something" (which would be only in the past). It can be useful to know these differences, but without any additional commentary it does look strange having that in this unit!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonkunKotona
JonkunKotona
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I think it's kinda good that it's here - it makes you pay attention, you cannot just translate everything as past perfect by default. You get to practice telling past perfect and present perfect apart.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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This is exactly what I was thinking.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adriano732737

i agree "You get to practice telling past perfect and present perfect apart."

one month later - i made the same mistake again ! I must pay more attention and employ second thoughts before assuming the past perfect.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Jamesw0906 suggested that Duolingo change the sentence from "por muchos años" to "hace muchos años" and I agree that then we could use the past perfect. Do you think they could?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

Yes, I think it would work fine. When I read the sentence, knowing it was "supposed" to be in past perfect, I envisioned talking to my elderly grandmother as we went through her old house, just visiting, and talking about how she had lived in it for many years. Duolingo could and should use the past perfect here. It's fine to make us think in other lessons. However, this lesson is specifically designed to teach past perfect. This looks like a mistake on Duolingo's part.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
Maria696768
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I agree

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleFenorme

To make sure you're awake.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dagorf

This sentence is Present Perfect, not Past Perfect !!!!!!!!!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dskell

I said "you have lived in this house for a lot of years" and got it wrong, please fix this!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Thanks for the report, it's now accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenGarman

I wrote: "You have lived in this house many years" which is perfect English and should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Whenever it's not accepted, report it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cameron.toms

I was always told that "por muchos años" was incorrect and should be "durante muchos años". Are both acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imjohnmoore

"Por muchos años" is "for many years," and "durante muchos años" is "during many years." There is some similarity of the phrases, but they are not exactly the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Except "during many years" is not used in English, so "durante muchos años" would also translate to "for many years".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seawaves12
seawaves12
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I am confused too; I remember one exercise marked 'durante muchos anos' as the only correct answer, not the other way around, which is why I am surprised 'por muchos anos' is the correct answer. Maybe both are acceptable. Actually google translates 'for many years' as 'durante muchos anos', btw.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesw0906

Wouldn't it be better and more grammatically correct to say "Hace muchos años que vives en esta casa"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

Jamesw0906, the sentence you posted is actually correct, not incorrect. "Hace muchos años que vives en esta casa" means pretty much the same thing as "Has vivido en esta casa por muchos años". They both mean that you still live in the house and that you've been doing so for a long time. Neither sentence is more grammatically correct; either can be used.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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That would not be the same sentence. That would be "Many years ago I lived in this house." (Except that you mistakenly used the present tense "vives") Maybe with your sentence, you only lived there for a few months, but it was many years ago. This sentence states that you have lived there for many years which ends up being in the present perfect tense. Your sentence could have been used with the past perfect or the past tense. So, we could have been able to say "Había vivido en esta casa hace muchos años." http://spanish.about.com/od/idiomsandphrases/qt/hace_ago.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Where did you find the word "ago" in your translation? I thought "Hace muchos años que vives en esta casa" literally meant "It makes many years that you live in this house." Except for the tense of "vives, isn't this more colloquial Spanish?"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I wondered the same thing. I think "hace muchos anos que vives in esta casa" means you have been living in this house for many years. In other words, you are still living there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanComyns

Susan, the meaning of "been" and "lived" are different and the translation is different. Someone could "be" somewhere without living there. "Vivido" clearly translates to "lived". I know it CAN be interchangeable, but it's not a real translation

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trillionaire47
Trillionaire47
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Why is 'you had lived for many years in this house' incorrect? Why should a change in the order of words affect the meaning in this case?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

The correct answer is "you HAVE lived in this house for many years". 'Had' is a different verb tense.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trillionaire47
Trillionaire47
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My comment has a typo - I meant to write 'you have lived'. Duolingo thinks 'you have lived for many years in this house' is incorrect. But in this sentence, the meaning is not affected by the order of the words. So why is it incorrect?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I think the answers are graded by a computer, so if you change the order of the words, the computer marks it wrong. The meaning is not affected by changing the word order, but in order avoid a wrong answer, it is best to translate it in the exact order in which it is written.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zopilotes1

guess what??? Since you are still living in this house, you can use present tense. Tú vives en esta casa por muchos años -- is the translation of this. Has + whatever participle implies a bunch of COMPLETED actions that may still happen maybe in the future. like... Has ido a Francia muchas veces. You have gone to France many time.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Wouldn't a bunch of repetitive actions (that might still happen in the future) require the use of an imperfect tense?

The present perfect is used when the action happened in the past (and likely completed there) but it still has an effect on the present. The person is probably not living in this house anymore.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Is this like a present progressive tense, zopilotes1?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnJohnso728909

Why does duolingo never accepts "home" for a "casa"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catcampion

home = hogar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I think but am not 100% certain that DL does accept "home" for "casa" but just in instances where the phrase is "a casa", e.g., "volver a casa" - "to return home"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NienieMiauw

Why is: you lived in this house for many years, wrong..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

'Has vivido' is in the present perfect tense and means 'have lived'. This is a different tense and a different meaning from 'lived', which is simple past tense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roberto_Marx
Roberto_Marx
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You have lived or you had lived?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"You have lived" in this case. It's using the present-tense has instead of the imperfect habeís.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jtsaenz
jtsaenz
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I submitted an 'report' for this lesson because it is the wrong tense. I advise others to do the same so that the error can be fixed.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

muchos años .... long time does this not mean the same thing as many years?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"You've been in the bathroom for a long time. Are you okay?" This is usually a sentence you'd say after some minutes, not many years. :)

Try to stay close to the original sentence with your translations.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

No, it is completely different. If you want to say "a long time", the correct translation is "mucho tiempo".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yarely794628

It wouldn't even let me finish the sentence

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcusDuar4

Thanks all for the explanation. Before go here I coukd not understand why I did it wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimMcConne2

Esta is the wrong word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You need to give more details about what you are answering.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenisAndre928618

I give the right answer and it said i was wrong but give the same answer , very maddening

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Report it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WodgerWabbit

This is in the wrong section. It is present perfect and should be past perfect.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan_Skelly
Susan_Skelly
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I wrote, "You have been in this house for many years", which is a perfectly natural sentence when talking about living situations in English. Could we get it added to the list of possible translations?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conrad-O
2 years ago