"Waar komt deze oostelijke wind vandaan?"

Translation:Where does this easterly wind come from?

December 9, 2014

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

Presumably, an easterly wind would come from...the east?

December 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deningrad

You would think that... And so would I... but for some magical reason in Dutch an eastern wind may come from the West, it seems. :p

March 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngarrang

Maybe it more of a philosophical question. It could also be the speaker wondering if there is a storm beyond the horizon. Or, it is just a silly sentence meant to teach us some Dutch. :)

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marvincorea

->

March 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/as2907

That's from the West, according to universally accepted conventions.

July 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rekty

Not bad.

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DogePamyuPamyu

Is vandaan komen "come from"?... Gebruik men dit voor voorwerpen, zoals de wind, en niet mensen? Ik kan dit niet goed begrijpen.

Oh, en ook heb ik Tagebuch von Anne Frank gelezen... in het verhaal er is een vrouw dat heet "Frau Van Daan" en ze woont natuurlijk in Nederland. Zijn "vandaan" en "van daan" aan elkaar verwant? o.e

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jimmmz

"vandaan komen" wordt ook gebruikt bij mensen, maar je gebruikt het alleen in een vraag. "Waar komt hij vandaan?" betekent "Where does he come from?". Een goed antwoord hierop is: "Ik kom uit Nederland." Bij het antwoord laat je "vandaan" dus weg.

In het dagboek van Anne Frank komt inderdaad "mevrouw van Daan" voor. In Nederland komt het vaak voor dat achternamen een tussenvoegsel hebben. Dat is een voorzetsel tussen de voornaam en de achternaam. Een bekend voorbeeld is "Vincent van Gogh", waar "van" het tussenvoegsel is. Dat "van Daan" bijna hetzelfde is als "vandaan" is puur toeval (of creatief van Anne Frank).

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joelson00

Alas, Duolingo does not (yet) allow 'From where does this east wind come?', but I have reported it. I did not dare write what I should have written in this context: 'Whence does this east wind come?'

March 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneVandek

"Whence" is beautiful. It most certainly would pass in my class. However, it is definitely haughty and mostly used in a literary effort, or when waxing poetic to a sweet someone. No ordinary folks on the street ever use "whence", but I certainly like it and recommend you for suggesting it as a good alternative for "wherefrom" or "from where".

March 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/as2907

As a mathematician I read it, hear it and use it all the time. In maths articles and books it is just as common as "therefore" or "thus".

March 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grey236

What's the difference between vandaan and uit/van?

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/montyjoham

Whence does this easterly (or east) wind come?

This should be acceptable

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joelson00

Whence and whither are wonderful words that are a part of my active vocabulary.

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LianeBond

Have never met anyone who would say that in real life...

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/montyjoham

True. But I find that older English forms like "lief" are helpful with Dutch. Just because it's old doesn't make it bad English. :)

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LianeBond

Not bad but not current either and I would think the whole point of learning a language is to learn how it's used in every day life, not how it was used decades and decades ago...

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joelson00

Unless you want to read old Dutch books. The point of learning a language is to be able to understand that language as written by its masters, in Dutch Jacob Cats, P. C. Hooft and Joost van den Vondel among many others, in English Shakespeare etc. Would you find it pointless to want to read Shakespeare?

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LianeBond

Absolutely not but, at this point of the language learning process, I would think that current usage is what we need to be learning.

September 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimDiggle

Whence means "comes from" so your sentence should read "whence comes this easterly wind"

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/as2907

"Whence" means "from where".

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimDiggle

You're right - I don't know why I wrote that, unless it is senility getting a grip!

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnkelD
  • 1553

Is there a rule (of sorts) for when to use deze and when to use dit ? Bedankt

November 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarleneMoa

Uh, the east maybe?

October 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneVandek

My old (Chicago) English teacher admonished me, and anyone else, to ever end a sentence with "from". It is poor English! It is slang! Instead, said the teacher, I should rewrite the sentence with "From where" or "wherefrom". Since then, my grades improved noticeably!

March 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhhpk

The key is in "old" - that's old prescriptive English. There's nothing wrong with ending a sentence with "from".

"Wherefrom" is, at best, archaic, but I'm not even sure it was ever an English word, and "from where" is, for modern linguistic studies, grammatically correct, but not natural English - nobody would say that unless they were trying to follow some rules based on Latin grammar made up by 19th century grammarians .

April 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joelson00

Yes, wherefrom is archaic, but it has been a word since the 14th century.

April 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/montyjoham

Wherefrom = Whence

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LianeBond

It used to be quite a big thing that you shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition but, nowadays, it can be seen as a bit pretentious... And no English native speaker would ever use wherefrom...

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joelson00

It behooves me to correct you: I am such an English native speaker, although I prefer whence to wherefrom.

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

I want to say the "sentence should never end with a preposition" rules was from academics who believed English should be more like Latin. But English isn't Latin--if anything, it probably gets more of its grammar from Germanic languages. Just look at the pattern of the verb+preposition pairings in English where the phrase acquires a distinctly separate meaning from the original verb--they're just like the separable verbs in Dutch and German. Heck, some of them are the same in all three languages--take "give up" (aufgeben/opgeven), "throw away" (wegwerfen/weggooien), and "fall out (of)" (ausfallen/uitvallen) for instance.

May 21, 2016
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