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"La tienne est petite."

Translation:Yours is small.

3 years ago

30 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/Karissa548

Are tien, mien and sien possessive adjectives or possessive pronouns? For is depend on sentence structure?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Tien, mien, and sien are possessive adjectives. Le tien, le mien, and le sien are possessive pronouns. http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais-anglais/tien/77104

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteinunnKG
SteinunnKG
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I typed: Yours is tiny, but i got incorrect can someone telll me why

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChanelParis

Can someone explain why 'Ton est petite' or 'Votre est petite' are wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegK.
OlegK.
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It would be the same as saying in English "Your is small".

Ton, votre = your

La tienne, le tien = yours

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BonBonChat
BonBonChat
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so yours, mine, etc is always fem. with an article? (the/la)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegK.
OlegK.
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No, it needs to agree in gender with the subject. If the subject is sing. fem., you have to use "la" (mienne, tienne, sienne). The gender of the subject can be derived from the preceding sentences/conversation. E.g.,

  • Ma voiture est rouge, et la sienne est noire. [My car is red, and his/her is black.]
  • Oui, mais la tienne est très sale. [Yes, but yours is very dirty.]

"La tienne" in the second sentence is connected to "la voiture" from the first one. If you talked about a sing. masc. subject, you would have to use "le" (mien, tien, sien):

  • Mon père est malade. [My father is ill.]
  • Le mien est malade aussi. [Mine is ill too.]
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hmada993
hmada993
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what about multiple objects like " I like my cars and not yours"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Gavier
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Le tien => les tiens
La tienne => les tiennes

J'aime mes voitures et pas les tiennes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hmada993
hmada993
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Alors, ca va etre " les miens,miennes,tiens,tiennes,siens,siennes,notres,votres,leurs" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Gavier
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Exactement! :-) Although note that it's "les nôtres/les vôtres"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/staalman

So what about words of both genders in one sentence?

  • Mon père et ma mère sont sympa. Et les tiens?

Is then automatically the male gender applied, similar to te rules around ils/elles?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavier
Gavier
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Yes, when a group is mixed always use the male plural forms.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flanz1961

Would 'le tien est petit' also be correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
ag3n7_z3r0
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Yes it would, if you were asked to translate from English to French. But the audio clarifies the gender of the object in question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginagillen
ginagillen
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when would you use tien as opposed to tienne?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nectarivorous

When the subject noun is male. à qui est le bonbon? c'est le tien.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariam_temem

i am confused on why they put le or la with the sentence. like “La tienne est petite.” i don’t understand. it does not make sence. can someone tell me why they do this

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegK.
OlegK.
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"La" and "le" in this case work as "the" article. Apart from serving the same purpose as "the" does in English (indicating "this particular noun and not any other"), they also contain information about the gender of the noun at hand. "La tienne" means "hers" or "its" provided that previously it was mentioned (or implied) that "it" is feminine.

  • Ma pomme est rouge, et la tienne est verte. [My apple is red, and yours is green.]
  • Mais la tienne est petite. [But yours is small.]

Since "pomme" is a feminine noun, we use "la" (as well as "tienne" and "verte") to show it.

  • Mon chat est noir, et le tien est blanc. [My cat is black, and yours is white.]
  • Mais le tien est petit. [But yours is small.]

Since "chat" is a masculine noun, we use "le" (as well as "tien" and "noir", and "blanc") to show all the way through that it is masculine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Watawkichaw

I'm sorry, I know this thread is months old for you at this point, but why in the world would it need to be shown all the way through the sentence? What is the point of saying "The mine" or The yours," when, contextually, it would be RARE occasion that without this would be confusing?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegK.
OlegK.
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The reason is simple: that's how French is. :) Every language has its peculiarities that may not make much sense to non-native speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Le tien" is a pronoun that stands in for a noun of masculine gender. "La tienne" is a pronoun that stands in for a noun of feminine gender. Same for le mien, la mienne, le sien, la sienne.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brigids.em
brigids.em
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So, a bit of context in case understanding the deeper why behind the grammar makes this construction in particular easier to deal with:

French has a way of using adjectives as nouns by putting an article (often the definite article, le/la/les) in front of the form of the adjective that matches the gender number of the noun we would use if we were just using the adjective in the normal way, and then omitting the noun itself. Here are a few examples: 1) Les jeunes gens = young people; les jeunes = the young (aka "kids today!) ;-) 2) L'écharpe bleue" = the blue scarf; la bleue = the blue one (and we use the same form of "bleu" that we would if we had included the word for what kind of thing the 'blue one' is, i.e. "une écharpe").

The le, la, or les and the lack of a noun work together to turn the adjective from "young" or "blue" (for example) into "the young one(s)" or "the blue one(s)." It says, in effect, "Hey, I know the next word looks like an adjective, but I'm an article, so treat that adjective like a noun!"

That process is essentially what the le/la/les do here in these sentences: they transform the possessive adjectives "ton" / "ta" / "tes" ("your") into the pronouns "le tien" / "la tienne" / "les tiens" / "les tiennes" ("yours," since we don't say "the your one" in English). The only difference between the two contexts is a slight change in form from ton/ta/tes to tien/tienne/tiens/tiennes, etc., where most non-possessive adjectives would keep the same form.

I hope that helps a little! :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JodieSmith1
JodieSmith1
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What is the "tienne" for?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morf23
morf23
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it means yours, but you also need to check the ending; in french they change depending on the genre of the noun.... http://www.frenchtutorial.com/en/learn-french/possessive/pronouns

2 years ago