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"Il va nous donner une pomme."

Translation:He is going to give us an apple.

5 years ago

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/momaguiar

I went to several English to French translators and asked for translation of "He will give us an apple" and they all gave me "Il va nous donner une pomme". So I don't understand why I was marked wrong for giving "he will give us an apple" as my answer. Any ideas out there? I think 'he is going to' and 'he will' should both be right.....

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanMontauk
SusanMontauk
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Most of us native English speakers agree with you. Duo is trying to get us to understand the difference between future and future proche and claiming that the "to be going" is the future proche and "will <verb>" is the future. I think that in English we use context to decide how near in the future something is much more than going vs will, but... So to get the answer right, we need to remember duo's configuration. It does remind us of another basic difference in French and English grammar, and that is a good thing.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TRGareau

This would make sense...but so far this is the only example where "will" is not accepted for me with this construction. (ie: I used "will" for all of the Infinitives 2 section, but it is not accepted here)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanMontauk
SusanMontauk
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Yes, I find the same thing. I've finished the tree so am always reviewing randomly, and I've come across a few where they won't accept "will" for future proche, but not many. Maybe there are different people making the decision on correctness for different exercises. I think this shows the limitation of trying to teach a language through the translation of single sentences. I keep reminding myself that this is not a test, but an almost painless way to learn basic French grammar and idioms.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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yeah will should totally be accepted

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MindsetNovice
MindsetNovice
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Why not "He goes to give us an apple." ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mptmpt
mptmpt
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the verb "aller" is used in French to form the near future tense, read more in the following article http://french.about.com/od/grammar/g/nearfuture.htm

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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RE mptmpt: It is used the same way in English. So "he is going" + infinitive. As for, "He goes + infinitive"--you could say it and you would be understood, but it is unnatural in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elementdeckhello

This is something I would also like to know

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
ElGusso
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Because as said above, "aller + verb" is most of the time used as a future tense, just like "to be going to + verb".

If you want to say that "he goes to give us an apple" (as in "he moves, leaves,...in order to give us an apple"), then in French it should be "Il va / part pour nous donner une pomme".

You can "feel" in English that the "to" has more meaning in "he goes to" than in the phrasal "he's going to" - which is often pronounced as "gonna" unlike the case of "he goes to". Therefore, in French, that "to" would be translated into "pour".

Since there is no "pour" in this exercise, it just means future tense and must be "he's going to give us an apple".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolee97

Why isn't a sentence, 'He will give an apple to us' correct? It only allows that the indirect object(us) precedes the direct object(an apple) for the verb, 'to give.'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaydashnine

When an English sentence uses "will," the verb is conjugated differently in French (you use irai). There's a difference between "he will" and "he's going to" like in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamonFelip

How about "Il va donner nous une pomme"? Does that work?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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No, the object of the verb is placed before the verb, i.e.,

  • il nous donne une pomme = he is giving us an apple
  • il va nous donner une pomme = he is going to give us an apple
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camanokunz

I'm getting this correct. But my question is why. :) I always think of "nous" as "we". I would think "nos" for "us".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Nos" is "our" in English. It is the plural form (used for plural owners and plural items possessed) as opposed to "notre" which is "our" for plural owners and singular item possessed. Nous (as a subject) is "we". Nous (as an object) is "us".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elmsyrup

Does il va only mean he is going to, as in 'he is physically going towards a place', or can it be metaphorical like in English, 'he will soon be performing an act'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
ElGusso
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"Il va + verbe" will generally mean "He's going to + verb" with an idea of future plan, even if it's immediate. So most of the time it will have that "metaphorical" sense you're talking about.

If the person's physically going somewhere, i.e. moving from one place to another, you're likely to use the preposition "à" (e.g. "Il va à la poste).

Now if you want to use "to go [physically]" with another verb, you can still use "aller + verbe" and the context will help to understand the meaning, or you can use another verb than "aller" altogether :

  • "Where's he going ?" - "He's going to get the parcel at the post office" = "Il va où ?" - "Il va chercher le colis à la poste" or "Il part / sort chercher le colis à la poste" (literally, "he 's leaving / he's going out to...")
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elmsyrup

Thanks for the explanation!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
ElGusso
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You're welcome.

Oh, by the way, I forgot an even more common way to phrase "to go [physically] + verb". Actually, if "to go" takes its more literal meaning, then the sentence is very likely to feature a place where the subject goes to (in English or in French or any other language).

Thus in French, we'd generally use the phrasing "aller à" + location + other verb ; placing the location right after "aller" (to go) gives it that more concrete meaning of "going somewhere" (and not "going to do sth in a near or far future").

With the example above, it goes like this :

  • Il va à la poste chercher le colis. (by saying that this way, it's clear that he is literally going now to the post office)
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SAJenkins

il [ donne; donner ] ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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When using the futur proche, "aller" is conjugated and followed by an infinitive. Consider these two sentences:

  • Il nous donne une pomme = he is giving us an apple
  • Il va nous donner une pomme = he is going to give us an apple
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceReed5217

I thought it was he is going woth us to give an apple. If doesnt seem clear that he is giving it to "us"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Hi, Grace. The indirect object pronoun that allows us to interpret it as "to us" is placed immediately before the verb for which it serves as the object. When a conjugation of "aller" is followed by an infinitive, it is called "futur proche" (near future) and is understood that the action of the main verb will occur shortly, i.e., he is going to + verb. The indirect object "nous" is placed before "donner" so it is (il va) "he is going to" + (nous donner) "give us" an apple.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel589120

I typed "Il va nous donné une pomme.", can anyone tell me why this is incorrect? It seems to be what I heard and seems to be a valid sentence as well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanMontauk
SusanMontauk
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Donne (with an accent aigu) and donner sound the same. But duolingo is looking for the future proche tense because it is uses "va." So it is "va donner"--"will give." Your sentence would be similar to someone saying "I will gave us an apple." It is the wrong tense. Future proche is always "aller (conjugated) verb (infinitive)." Spelled with the accent, the past tense is indicated. One of the most difficult things with French is the spelling--there are so many different ways to spell the same sound.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel589120

Thank you, I listened to it over and over and it sounded like "Il va nous donné une pomme", --It will give us an apple. I thought because aller was irregular that this was a correct construct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andy1242

Why not he will give us an apple?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanMontauk
SusanMontauk
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In my opinion, the difference in English between "he will" and "he is going" is negligible, but Duo is trying to emphasize the difference between the French future proche and the future tenses. To do this, they are using the "is (or am or are) going" construction to translate the future proche. I am not certain if they insist on "will" for future or not.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/i_want_to_know

why no dash between nous and donner?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElGusso
ElGusso
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There is usually no hyphen between a pronoun and a verb ("hyphen" and not "dash", the former links two words, the latter is a longer punctuation in a sentence, i.e. — ).

That hyphen you're talking about rather occurs between a verb and a pronoun, as in :

  • "Dis-moi la vérité !" (Tell me the truth), while there is no hyphen in "Tu me dis la vérité" or even "Il va me dire la vérité".

  • "Avez-vous votre ticket ?" (Do you have your ticket ?), while the affirmative version is "Vous avez votre ticket".

So the sentence here "Il va nous donner une pomme" would have a hyphen only when a pronoun appears after a verb:

  • when asking a formal question (i.e. with inversions) : "Va-t-il nous donner une pomme ?" (Is he going to give us an apple ?).

Note that the first hyphen here is for the "t" that only serves as a liaison between the vowels of "va" and "il" (with other pronouns : "vas-tu... ?", "vais-je... ?", "allons-nous...?", etc.)

  • with an imperative : "Donne-nous une pomme !" (Give us an apple).

As you can see, pronouns usually never follows an infinitive verb , like "donner" in this exercise. So even as a subject, e.g. "Giving us an apple is an act of generosity", there would be no hyphen either : "Nous donner une pomme est un acte de générosité".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanMontauk
SusanMontauk
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Does this sentence really mean "He is going to give us each an apple." Or, the same meaning: "He is going to give us apples." ? This English translation implies one apple for all of us. Does French use the singular and plural differently than English when something is being done for a group, or is this translation correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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The sentence could be interpreted either way but it is understood that each would receive an apple. I.e., in French, there is no worry about it.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Qiset1
Qiset1
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it says write what you hear. What? I didn't hear the silent r at the end of "donner"! That's just crazy.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Really? You didn't hear the silent "r". Wait....it's silent, right?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlhutton
rlhutton
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I guess Texan isn't accepted, they wouldn't take "He's fixing to give us an apple".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

That's probably a bit too colloquial to be accepted, Duolingo generally looks for literal (while still grammatically correct in English), straightforward translations.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabeDC
GabeDC
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Agreed. In another exercise's discussion, some people were arguing that "Thank you much" should be accepted. I explained that although I've heard people in my home state of Texas say that, it probably wasn't standard English. It's not as though Duolingo can be accountable for every possible combination and permutation of regional dialects.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danilochin
danilochin
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why is "he will give us an apple" not accepted?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

The course is probably trying to teach the difference between this tense and futur simple, but I'm pretty sure "will" has been accepted in other sentences, so I say report it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tsuj1g1r1
tsuj1g1r1
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To everybody wondering about "will", consider this: If your friend is going out in the rain and you say "Take my umbrella if you want" and they reply "No worries, I will take the car", it's not the same as "No worries, I am going to take the car". The first implies your friend decided to take the car specifically because of your offer, whereas the second implies they already had that plan in mind and were in the process of implementing it already and simply decided to inform you to put your mind at ease. If somebody passes their hand through a fence of a yard with a big mean dog, saying "Be careful, the dog will bite you!" is very different fom "Be careful! The dog is going to bite you!" The first means you simply presume there is a danger because of your experience with the dog, whereas the second means the dog is actually running towards them right this very second and they need to pull their hand away as quickly as possible. I do agree with Duolingo that "going to" captures the meaning of the French sentence much better in this context.

1 month ago