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"Lo habían decidido sus enemigos."

Translation:His enemies had decided it.

5 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mommasspanish1

another backwards sentence.... 'it had decided his enemies'... sheesh

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I do not think that means the same, in your sentence it seems that "it" had decided who his enemies are or something similar. In DL's sentence it means that it had been decided by his enemies.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkofSky

How do we say "it has decided his enemies" and how do we know that this is not what this sentence is saying?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Well, first of all, does "It has decided his enemies" make sense in English? In Spanish that would be "ha decidido sus enemigos", but it makes little sense, as if it was an incomplete sentence. It should be something like: "ha decidido quiénes son sus enemigos" or something like that (he (?) has decided who his enemies are (?)).I did not notice before, but if the thing deciding is "it", should it not be "its enemies" and not "his enemies"? Is "it" deciding the enemies of someone else? I do not get that sentence, so if you could explain it to me, maybe I would be able to help you.

In the original sentence, "sus enemigos" is the subject, they are the ones "deciding" (hence the verb agreeing with that) and "lo" is a pronoun that works as the direct object ("it" - the thing they had decided), so you just have to translate it keeping in mind that: His/her/its enemies had decided it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CNyE
CNyE
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I agree that "it has decided his enemies" makes no sense... for me it was the literal translation of the sentence. But I still don't quite understand the leap to "his enemies had decided it". The fact that the original sentence makes no sense somehow didn't lead me to the latter. I will work on it some more... thanks for your explanation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

In Spanish it is very common to have sentences in both the "normal" order and an inverted one:

"Paula lo vio" - "Lo vio Paula" = Paula saw it/him.

It is the same in this case.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

Say a fued had decided his enemies. You'd already been talking about the fued in the conversation so it would make sense to say it had decided his enemies. Or they had decided his enemies. I personally found it hard to translate and still don't understand how the sentence tells us that the enemies did the deciding.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TezraM

Wouldn't the correct translation for it had decided his enemies -----be----- Había decidido a sus enemigos?

Also, I think it does make sense. El rey había firmado un tratado, y había decidido a sus enemigos.

Do I have that right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Había decidido a sus enemigos" still sounds odd to me, but that can be my problem and not a matter of it being incorrect. I would be grateful if other users could clear that up for us.

As you write it, it does make sense if we personalise, say, a country:

"El país había decidido a sus enemigos".

It can't work with "the king" because "the king" is not "it" but "he", right? But now that I think about it, maybe it could work that way? Still not sure...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TezraM

I was thinking El tratado había decidido a sus enemigos...los enemigos del rey.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azizspanish

So is it common to have these 'backward' sentences? Am i right to think that 'Sus amigos lo habian decido ' means the same?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I am not sure if I have got what you are asking...

Sus amigos lo habían decidido = Lo habían decidido sus amigos {- means the same, both are correct and yes, this is common.

In @mommasspanish1's case, you would need a "been" there to mean the same:

Lo habían decidido sus enemigos = Sus enemigos lo habían decidido {- means the same. But "It had decided his enemies" is not the same, you would need to say: "It had BEEN decided BY his enemies" to make the passive sentence that would mean the same as the original one.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azizspanish

Thank you! I'm learning Spanish so you answered my question clearly! And the other question concerning 'ella' too! Thanks again Babella!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

You are welcome, I am glad I could help you.

¡Ánimo con los estudios! ;]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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May I ask a question on your answer? In this sentence there is not a subject pronoun, however these are usually omitted; so couldnt sus amigos be the object or the subject?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Sus amigos" is the subject, they are the ones that "decide" over "lo" (it?). "Lo" is the object here, the thing that receive the action of "deciding".

Does this make sense?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lastnightilie
lastnightilie
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I think the OP was not offering that as a possible answer, but just trying to point out that if you translate the sentence literally, it means something different, which is confusing. Since we don't write sentences in this order in English it's hard to grasp. I couldn't make sense of this Spanish sentence at first either.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

I think that's his point. The sentence in Spanish seems backwards and lost in translation his enemies is at the back of the sentence in Spanish but front in the translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TezraM

Here is how I figured out it was backwards:

There's no personal "a". So sus enemigos can't be the predicate.

Lo is a direct pronoun. So we know that what was decided was lo.

Habían means the subject can't be it because it is conjugated to a plural subject.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewTurn4

I've just scrolled down till someone pointed out what information is contained in Habían good post :) back to the quiz :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

I was trying to break it up like this TezraM but I couldn't make a sentence which made any sense so I just wrote the words in the same order.as they were written expecting to get it wrong and learn from my mistake. Hopefully better luck next time. Eh this course is testing at times. Good luck everyone.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CynDaVaz

I thought this was something like, "They had decided their enemies." (Which I realize makes no sense, but some of Duolingo's sentences can be like that.) I still don't understand where it's supposed to be a conclusive: "His enemies had decided it." Can't 'sus enemigos' also mean 'their enemies'? If so, how do we know they're talking about someone's enemies, or a group of people with enemies?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lastnightilie
lastnightilie
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"Sus" can mean his, her, or their... I'm guessing they would all be marked as correct. I agree that it's confusing at first because we would never put the subject at the end of the sentence, but in Spanish they do sometimes. If you translate it word for word, it reads "It they had decided, his enemies." It's WEIRD, but the only possible translation you can really get from that, which makes sense, is "His enemies had decided it."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

This is what I think- "Lo" is an direct object pronoun and can never be a subject pronoun. That's our first clue that we have to find the subject. As well to make "sus enemigos" the object I believe it would need to be preceded with a preposition. Like Babella said "by his enemies" for example.

Would it be fair to say that if the person/persons being talked about doesn't have a preposition or "a" before it, in all likelihood it cannot be the object, it must be the subject of the sentence? I am looking for a way to identify the subject quickly. Ideas?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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The missing a is a good clue i think, thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spade

what the h**l!!!? can any one explain this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yourmumohhh

Spanish often sounds like Yoda lol. This is a Yoda sentence! Literal translation: "They had decided it his enemies" lol. The pronouns (ie. "lo" for "it") generally go in front of the verb and oftentimes the nouns (ie. his enemies) go after the verb. That's why it's like Yoda language :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scooke11024

It makes more sense in English if you pretend there is a "by" in there. It had been decided by his enemies

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

Why is the subject at the end of the sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/von842382

His enemies had decided it

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmedMetwa547013

I want to know when"sus" can mean"your" or" his or her?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IRBGOODYA

If this does not mean "They had decided their enemies" then how would you say that in Spanish? Would ellos/ellas be needed for it to make sense that way?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whrobbins24

How on earth can you tell whether this is saying "they had decided," "it had been decided..." (the translation provided by Duolingo), or "his enemies had decided" which awkwardly places the subject at the end of the sentence. It boggles the mind.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wbt
wbt
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This sentence makes more sense with a sentence before, such as, "He would die."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_Guy

This requires a lot of mental gymnastics for me. "They had decided it, his enemies", that's what I see and then I have to turn it into something approaching English. How in the Hell could you ever do this just by ear?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtturman
dtturman
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My gosh, even Google Translate can't figure this one out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mnovack

This sentence seemed to be missing words in Spanish to me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mnovack

Because they told me the correct answer was it had been decided by their enemies, no word for by and that lo through me off

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StoversMom

Feel the same way - what a translation - confusing to me!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

I think I need a certain little jedi master to translate spanish for me.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnarlsBarky
SnarlsBarky
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This sentence is like if Rube Goldberg tried to speak Spanish.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
jennesy
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It didn't take "it had decided its enemies" when I tried it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack.george

Is that weird construction reallly worth all the effort to get so many different interpretations? I want to know what each actually means, I am not interested in all theses educated guesses as to what is correct. way too much wasted time with discussions.

4 years ago