"Jackan har en ficka."

Translation:The jacket has a pocket.

December 10, 2014

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RaptorsOnBikes

I always have to remember to be careful with "ficka". Read this as "the jacket has a girl"!

December 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Astronomy487

Same!

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/passchn

After half an hour with clothes-vocabulary, I understand "Jag kan ha en fika". ok - I need a pause now.

January 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ViArSkoldpaddor

Yes, you deserve the coffee break.

February 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikSpyro

I think you mean "behöver" (need) and not "kan ha" (can have). Right?

June 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanda.Zanon

Hahahahaha i made the same mistake of translating "ficka" as girl. After sentences such as "the dog is eating the cat" this one didn't seem so weird LOL

May 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/J2.L4

I thought ficka was like a coffee shop or something

January 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

That's fika, with a long i-sound.

January 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/J2.L4

Glad I wasn't going out to pocket with the exchange student two years ago, it was beginning to sound like some sort of euphemism.

January 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaac_Luna_

Also note the stressed syllable: fi-KA and FIC-ka.

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ViArSkoldpaddor

Tonal stress, right?

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Yes, both are stressed on the first syllable so it's actually FI-ka and FICK-a. In fika, the i is long and the k short; in ficka, the i is short and the k sound long. For people who only speak Russian, the big problem of course is the difference between long and short syllables, but since you're also a native speaker of German, that's not a problem for you.

All two syllable words in Swedish have either akut accent (= accent I) or grav accent (aka accent II), but the difference is rarely distinctive. In some dialects, they are never distinctive. In some cases, which accent a word has also varies between different dialects.

fika is accent 1 and ficka is accent 2, but in reality you can ignore that – the most important difference between fika and ficka is the respective length of the vowel and consonant.

I'd also like to recommend the great videos by blehg, there's a list here where you can find a link to a great one about pitch accent: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6502614

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ViArSkoldpaddor

To me as a native Russian and German speaker they sound identically stressed, since "our" (both Russian and German) stress depends on "accoustic intensity" - ie loudness and distinctive pronounciation, rather than tonal features, that Swedish seems to be using in some cases. That's where my question comes from.

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ViArSkoldpaddor

Tack så mycket för hjälpen!

I think this is crucial knowledge for beginning learners of Swedish. Had I known this in the beginning, I would have memorized the accent with the word from start... (Though I think I can remember most of the pitch 2 words my friend uses frequently, since they have a very distinct sound)

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaac_Luna_

Yes. It would seem they have similar rhythmic values, and since letters do not necessarily have emotions, they are not literally "stressed". Thus, tonal stress seems to be what I meant :)

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/robine198285

Small difference beween coat and jacket

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ThoopidThathe

Lol there is hon and han now theres flicka and ficka! xD

May 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Cactus_Yang

Using Google Translation, ficka does not have the /l/ voice.

February 16, 2018
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