1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Sie isst eine Tomate."

"Sie isst eine Tomate."

Translation:She eats a tomato.

July 13, 2013

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Awesometacious

So, how do I know that his is 'she' rather than just a formal 'you'? Can it not also be "You are eating a tomato"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

Formal you would also require the plural form of the verb: „Sie essen eine Tomate.“


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pointlessness

Couldn't that also mean "they eat a tomato?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

Yes, it could. Apart from the capitalized pronoun (not applicable at the beginning of the sentence), formal you is identical to 3rd person plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sawerapasha

No it would be Sie ESSEN eine tomate. If there is isst with sie it means a she


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_ChanWK

Sie means they or she,you in german is either du or ihr


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

German also uses a formal address for 2nd person, which would indeed be Sie. Wikipedia has a section about when it's used. If you only want to check the inflection table, you should check this link


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yerin0126

I wrote 'Sie ist eine Tomate' but it said it's right. Isn't it 'Sie isst eine Tomate"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaptainkc

"Sie ist" means "she is". "Sie isst" means "she eats". Make sure you count the s's.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TedBerkowitz

Yes, if you hear this sentence being spoken, it most likely is the case that the word being used is isst and not ist. In other words, Sie isst eine Tomate ("She eats a tomato") generally makes more sense than Sie ist eine Tomate ("She is a tomato").

However, there is no way to differentiate isst and ist by speech alone. Also, Duolingo has many other (and much stranger) examples of sentences without context. As a result, it would not be fair to say that Sie ist eine Tomate is incorrect if you're being asked to type what you hear because there is no way to tell that it's incorrect without more context. Of course, we can assume the more likely context, but there are always exceptions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhx4mp

Same with me. I was confused until I saw the correct translation: She is eating a tomato.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OstapSuta2005

It just thinks you accidentally missed out a word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dudeface34m

OH NO!!

I wrote "She is a tomato."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chinazhang

Why not "Sie isst einen Tomate."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

die Tomate is a feminine noun and requires the feminine inflection of the article, here in accusative case: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/eine#Declension_3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvavorWalle

Tomate is female: die Tomate. So it can be:"Sie isst eine Tomate". It means: she's eating a tomato. Or she eats a tomato.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephmasti

How can you tell the difference between "ist" and "isst" when is it spoken out loud?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

Only by context. They are pronounced exactly the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZeynepYarenW

OMG! In my opinion German is easier than Turkish!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheerfuldave

OK, so how do I know whether "Sie isst ein Tomate" means "She eats..." or "They eat...?" This seems confusing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

The Sie alone could allow the translation with she, they or the formal you, but the inflection of the verb restricts it to she.

„Sie essen…“ would either be they or the formal your – these two versions are equivalent except for the capitalized pronouns in the formal you form. So if the pronouns is at the beginning of the sentence, these two are both possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhx4mp

Since "they" is plural, it would be "sie essen." Of course, it could also be a formal you: "Sie essen."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke-899e9

Is "the chicken" "Das Hähnchen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisaochtheo

Yes it is, but only when its the food. When its alive its called "Das Küken"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alek_bn

I heard "Sie isst alle Tomaten" and I think the meaning would be "she is eating all tomatoes", but something doesn't seem right in my sentence, despite the fact it is not the pronounced one. Suggestions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dametta

You can either use 'they'or 'she' for Sie, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

Please take a look at the question by cheerfuldave above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikkoalPet

What is the difference between "ist" and "isst" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZeynepYarenW

Ist means "is" Isst means "eats"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MDATIFBINK

what is the difference between " sie " & " Sie "? as far i have that Sie stands for they. if so then why it is not " they are eating a tomato "?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZeynepYarenW

Mm, it seems its confusing but if you think sensibly its so easy!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MandeepMaan

Why "They are eating a tomato" is not a correct ans..??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

Please take a look at the question by cheerfuldave above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OstapSuta2005

Because the first word is meant to be she


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doodelay

Sie ist eine Tomate ;D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob_smoker

Could this sentence, when heard, mean both: "She eats a tomato" ("Sie isst eine Tomate") and "It is a tomato" ("Sie ist eine Tomate")?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob_smoker

Or is "Es" used for all inanimate objects?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rizel1

When do you use ein and eine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binweg

This depends on the grammatical case as well as the grammatical gender of the noun: Inflection table

neuter noun, accusative case („direct object case“):
„Sie isst ein Ei.“ – “She's eating an egg.”

feminine noun, accusative case:
„Sie isst eine Tomate.“ – “She's eating a tomato.”

two masculine nouns, once with nominative case („subject case“) and once with accusative case:
„Ein Mann isst einen Apfel.“ – “A man is eating an apple.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGaromine

My sister did a mistake once, and it was hilarious. Instead of putting "She eats/is eating a tomato," she wrote, "She is a tomato." Hilarious right? Well, when you read it, id doesn't sound funny, but if you were here, you'll still be laughing, kind of...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamdom20

Even though ive been studying German for years, my first instinct is always "she is a tomato" for isst lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krste425899

I wrote "she is eating a tomato" , but wrong. Why?

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.