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"Esa niña toca la campana todos los días."

Translation:That girl rings the bell every day.

0
5 years ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Zikosi
Zikosi
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Is there a such thing as playing the bell? Wouldn't you be playing several bells, or am I missing something here? Just curious.

15
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

She could be ringing a bell to call people to lunch or beckon her servant, I suppose.

12
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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But then it would be "rings the bell". I don't think it would ever be "plays the bell".

21
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

In English, we would distinguish between "playing" the bell and "ringing" the bell, even with the same exact bell, based upon what is done with it (or perhaps more precisely, how one interacts with it). "Playing" the bell implies using some musical skill to produce music with the bell. "Ringing" the bell does not imply using musical skill - one is merely causing the bell to ring. So, I would ring the cowbell to call my students in from recess, but I would play the cowbell for the square dance hoedown.

Does Spanish similarly distinguish with the verb used, based upon how one interacts with the bell?

26
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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No, in Spanish "tocar la campana" is the common way to say this. There are other verbs "las campanas repican" or "las campanas doblan", meaning a longer sound for a celebration or sth.

For Whom the Bell Tolls, "Por quién dobla la campana", is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Phew, it likes "rings the bell".

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-montunero
el-montunero
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No, (cow)bells are used as a percussive instrument in latin music, therefore it can be played.

12
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Very true. In symphonic music too.

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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel_B
Daniel_B
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I tried "That girl rings the bell every day." and it accepted my answer.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buachaill

A bell can be a musical instrument.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry182846
Barry182846
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Apparently they've changed it to rings the bell. I put plays the bell this time round and got marker wrong.

2
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rob.merryl

Im somewhat disappointed it disallowed tolls the bell. Certainly a synonym of rings in english.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morne

I'm not sure, but isn't tolls something the bell does, not something a person can do to a bell? You can ring a bell and the bell rings, but I'm not sure if you can toll a bell so that it tolls.

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Interesting. I looked it up, and the "ring a bell" meaning is listed as both transitive and intransitive. For example http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/toll

The transitive meaning can be both the act of ringing a bell, and also the bell tolling some message.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haowanr
haowanr
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todo el día = all the day , and todos los días = every day?

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SD-77
SD-77
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Sí. Todo el día=all day, todos los días or cada día=every day.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arsenalfc
Arsenalfc
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Does tocar not mean touch?

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Yes, it could be "touches the bell" or "plays the bell". But "The girl touches the bell every day" would be weird unless it was the beginning of something like "The girl touches the bell every day as she walks past it."

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pk008

Haha. I put "The girl touches the bell every day". I thought it sounded a little archaic.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abcdedbca
abcdedbca
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English is not my native language, so I have a question: what are possible translations of "todos los días" with the word 'all'? "all the days"? Is it correct in English? TY,

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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In English we just say, 'every day'.

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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We do not say 'all the days'. It is an idiomatic phrase to us English Speakers because an idiom is a phrase where the words together have a meaning that is different from the dictionary definitions of the individual words. And when it is translated into Spanish from English it is an idiomatic phrase to the Spanish speakers for the same reason. We just have to memorize these differences. (and sometimes Big Differences).

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toggrikk
toggrikk
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It would depend on the context, right? If the discussion was about which days the girl plays the bell, a valid part of the conversation could surely be: "The girl plays the bell all the days." Or?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpelle27
kpelle27
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"All the days" sounds wrong, so in a very specific context someone might say "on all of those days" or "on all the days when..." It would still be better, though to use "every" or "each."

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnjeTheNerd

No one would misunderstand "all the days", but it would sound unusual. "Every day" is most common (to the point where it can be written everyday in some contexts), while "every single day" or "each day" might be used to emphasize the phrase.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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No, "all the days" isn't idiomatic. Maybe "all the time", but I think that's "todo el tiempo" in Spanish.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dvine1987

Is this a hispanic expression for "flicking the bean"?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snoue

i have seen three different spanish sentences that all translate to this same sentence, how come?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John_Payne

I was corrected for using everyday, which is allowed in English. Does Spanish not recognize that usage?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisOlive2

I think you would need a space in between "every" and "day" to make it proper English. I think everyday might be an adjective. In this case we're not using it to describe a noun, we're using it to state a frequency of ringing the bell, which is "every day".

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Right. "Everyday" is only used as an adjective (an everyday occurrence) or in casual speech as a noun following "for" (those are the clothes I wear for everyday).

It's pronounced differently from "every day": "EV'ryday" vs "EV'ry DAY", and it doesn't mean "each day", it means "usual" or "commonplace".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpelle27
kpelle27
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Note that "for everyday" is not acceptable everywhere - I've never heard it in the US.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John_Payne

Entiendo. Gracias.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John_Payne

Kpelle27, I've heard it in the us, but....not every day. :)

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aeeshalove

I tried that girl plays the bell everyday and it didn't accept my answer.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"every day" is two words here. "everyday" is only one word when it's an adjective ("an everyday occurrence"). See the other thread about "everyday" in this discussion.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Invicat

Is "tocar" specific to certain instruments when it is used as "to play?" For instance, would you still use "tocar" when talking about playing a trombone or clarinet? The examples I've seen so far are drums and bells, so I'm wondering if it is different for instruments in which touch is not a key part of playing, like perhaps a harmonica.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnjeTheNerd

Just asked a native speaker (Honduras) who's sitting next to me. She says they'll use "tocar" for wind instruments too.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelleGi1

Didn't tocar means touch?? Why did it say play

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Tocar is to play (an instrument) as well as to touch.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It means "play" when it's a musical instrument, "tocar un violín".

I see from here, http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/tocar, that for a bell, it means "ring".

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Troublemaker ;-)

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricekristi

I wrote it exactly as how the answer showed, and it still said it was wrong

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricekristi

I wrote it exactly as how the answer showed, and it still said it was wrong

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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"Plays with the bell"? :)

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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For playing with something, the verb is "jugar". The "tocar" meaning of "play" is for playing something in the musical sense.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Algarrobina

JUEGA

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KLTah
KLTah
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how would you say "all day long"?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZainDar1

whats the difference between toca and juego?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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One means "touch" and one means "play". But in Spanish, they don't say "play" for playing instruments, they say "tocar". When I think about it, the concept of "touch" kind of makes more sense than the concept of "play".

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kymmer.c

I put, "That girl rings the bell every day" and got it right

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Reply1 year ago