"Ich mag den Verkehr nicht."

Translation:I do not like the traffic.

July 13, 2013

73 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DracheK

Incidentally, "Verkehr haben" in German is slang for "having sex," which my German teacher in college relayed to us via an amusing store. Her friend was new to German and said, "Du hast so viel Verkehr," after having been stuck in traffic for hours.

November 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/borQhuester

I enjoy learning some of the slang! I have been told that the phrase, "Ich bin gut." implies being good in bed... and perhaps is the proper response to "Du hast so viel Verkehr"!

April 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalvanTivadar

Here is a genuine German joke for you: Ältere Dame zum Schaffner: -- Sie verkehren doch viertelstündlich, nicht wahr? -- Gnädige Frau, ich bin doch kein Hahn!

June 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    (Translation:)

    Older lady (to the train conductor): "You run quarter-hourly, don't you?
    Conductor: "Madam, I am no rooster!"

    The pun is that verkehren means both "to run (every so often)", e.g. Der Zug verkehrt stündlich = "The train runs hourly", but also "to associate/have sex with", e.g. Die Frau verkehrt mit ihrem Mann. The woman was, in the context of the situation, asking whether the trains run every fifteen minutes. The conductor was cheeky and interpreted the second meaning of the word, saying there's no way he's having sex that often (presumably roosters are quite sexually active).

    In everyday conversation, I think you'd more likely ask Wie oft fährt der Zug? or Die Bahn fährt doch viertelstündlich, nicht wahr? as in the example. Then there's no chance of jokes.

    The word Verkehr doesn't need to be avoided, though - it's in common daily use, for example Verkehrsinfos, Verkehrsmeldungen, Verkehrs-Update... But using the verb verkehren with mit jemandem will probably raise a few eyebrows.

    April 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

    "Trafficking" also can have sexual meanings in English - references to child trafficking, for example.

    July 21, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/prandall1

    I wonder if it's similar to remaking "you have so much ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤!" in English?

    October 9, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arhitetka

    This is so useful because I might move to Germany soon. Thank you! :')

    July 28, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne____

    And on the street no less.

    September 29, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitchstone

    I still am confused when to use "Nicht" in a sort of declarative sentence.

    October 26, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valestellarium

    This is exactly what I needed: something that helps me to practice the difference between "kein" and "nicht".

    Thank you!

    May 3, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nick40vmi

    I "traffic have" love this website!

    February 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peachytal

    It is usually after the verb you want to make negative

    April 6, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l0c0m0tiv3

    "I don't like traffic" should work as well

    July 29, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dietz-tochter

    Agreed, I even put "I do not like traffic" and it was shown wrong, I'm sorry but "I do not like the traffic" is just bad English.

    September 7, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tandordraco

    There is nothing bad about "I do not like the traffic." I would use it when referring to specific traffic, perhaps mentioned already in conversation, i.e. "I do not like the traffic in Chicago."

    'Traffic' in this case is an event or a condition, one that can be good or bad (similar to 'weather' - one would not say "I don't like weather." Instead it would be "I don't like the weather).

    Saying "I don't like traffic" makes 'traffic' a concept or idea; much less specific. It also implies or can force a definition of traffic that is inherently negative, which does not really reflect the meaning of the word (there is such thing as good traffic, i.e. "the traffic is running smoothly today").

    December 6, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tandordraco

    The definite article, 'den' is used in the German sentence in this example, so why should the definite article 'the' not be used in the English translation? There is a slight difference in meaning between "I don't like traffic," and "I don't like the traffic [here]."

    December 6, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiUutura

    It just hit me how difficult German can be. In English, often times you can guess a sentence by the first few words, making things like talking to someone in a crowded room quite easy. In German, the entire sentence can change with a single "nicht" at the very end. I suppose it makes people be more attentive in conversation, which is good c:

    June 18, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Voenskjall

    I have heard that their jokes can be pretty tricky. Imagine the punchline, how easy it is to ruin a whole sentence ( or negate its meaning to be the opposite of what you wanted to say ) with a single ''nicht'' at the very end of a sentence as you said, haha

    June 18, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiUutura

    Oh goodness, yeah, I bet! I hadn't even considered how joke telling would be in German! And on that note, sarcasm in German must be interesting too~! Is it much different than English? o3o

    June 18, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Voenskjall

    Unfortunately I don't know that, I have (tried) to read a few newspapers but that's all, looks like we must find it out together or wait for a native German to answer this question

    June 18, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awehman

    Couldn't this also be I do not like the transportation or transport?

    July 13, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jess1camar1e

    I would use 'Verkehrsmittel' or 'Verkehrswesen' for a particular mode of transport, though 'public transportation' in general is 'öffentlicher Verkehr'.

    July 30, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kibblebibble

    how come "that traffic" is ok and not "this traffic?

    July 31, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      Both are accepted now. See hutcho66's explanation for more details.

      April 14, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jess1camar1e

      "This traffic" specifically would be "diesen Verkehr".

      July 31, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hutcho66

      I disagree, 'dies' refers specifically to either this or that, but the definite article could be (most often) 'the', or occasionally this or that. For example, if I were to ask you 'Magst du diesen Verkehr?' (Do you like this traffic?), you could answer 'Ich mag den Verkehr nicht' and it could be translated as either 'I don't like the traffic' or 'I don't like this traffic'. Both are identical in this case.

      The main case where you can't interchange them is when 'this/that' is used to highlight one thing out of many, for example if you were pointing out one of multiple cars, 'Ich mag dieses Auto' would be correct, 'Ich mag das Auto' would not.

      August 2, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jess1camar1e

      Careful - it won't be 'die Verkehr', but 'den'. I agree that either article would work conversationally, but Duo is often looking for a specific sentence.

      August 2, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiya90

      hey, i know it might be a stupid question, but i was wondering why we put here DEN?

      June 27, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalvanTivadar

      In this sentence, "der Verkehr" is the object, hence it must be put in accusative case, and the accusative case of the singular masculine article "der" happens to be "den". ;)

      June 27, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiya90

      can you give me an example when "der Verkehr" would not be the object...when we would not put den? just to see the difference :)

      June 27, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalvanTivadar

      "Der Verkehr ist rege [lively]". In this sentence "der Verkehr is the subject, therefore in nominative case.

      June 27, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiya90

      thanks a lot, it makes sense now :)

      June 27, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hutcho66

      You are right, I didn't notice that mistake... Fixing it now!

      August 3, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kibblebibble

      cool, thanks for both your answers. i saw as soon as i answered it that 'this traffic' wasn't the best answer - i just wondered if there was a reason why 'that' is accepted, and 'this' isn't - i think its just a mistake.

      August 20, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Georgur

      So "geschlechtverkehr" means "traffic of genders"?

      January 8, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Verkehr can also mean "❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤" in the sense of "dealings with another person" (though that meaning is nearly obsolete in modern English).

      January 9, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0zy20

      Is “Ver” a prefix? If it is, then what's it's function?

      November 13, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Is “Ver” a prefix? If it is, then what's it's function?

      Yes, it is a prefix, but it has a wide array of functions and meanings, so it’s not possible in general to predict the meaning of a compound using that prefix given the meaning of the base word.

      It’s related to the English prefix “for-“, which dictionary.com glosses as

      a prefix meaning “away,” “off,” “to the uttermost,” “extremely,” “wrongly,” or imparting a negative or privative force, occurring in verbs and nouns formed from verbs of Old or Middle English origin, many of which are now obsolete or archaic: forbid; forbear; forswear; forbearance.

      Given “give, get, bid”, could you derive the meanings of “forgive, forget, forbid”?

      With Verkehr, you also have the result of centuries of meaning change.

      kehren means basically “turn”, and verkehren was then “turn around, change, turn into its opposite” which then shifted from “change” to “earn money through a craft” and then “trade”; the associated noun Verkehr was originally thus “trade, distribution of goods”, later “(commercial) association with someone, connection” and then “going back and forth, conveying people or goods, traffic”.

      November 13, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowschank

      People are so upset with traffic that they named it "f**k you" :D

      August 6, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mithrandre

      Greatest mnemonic ever. Danke!

      June 21, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowschank

      Bitteschoen. :D

      June 22, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomerisrael

      Couldn't it be - I don't like the sex/❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤? :)

      August 19, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowschank

      As mentioned above, it really doesn't help that the word sounds like "Fk yeah!" or "Fk You!"

      "I don't like the f**k, yeah!"

      August 19, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheCourtJester

      What does "Ich mag keinen Verkehr" translate to then?

      December 15, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
      Mod

        More like "I don't like (any) traffic".

        January 21, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atomic_Sheep

        How do you pronounce Verkehr?

        March 4, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

        According to Wiktionary (), it is pronounced [fɛɐ̯ˈkeːɐ̯]

        [f] like fun,

        [k] as in king,

        [ɛ] as in bed,

        [e] as in kid (in some dialect, most notably in California)

        and [ɐ] as in nut.

        August 5, 2016

        [deactivated user]

          I would say fur-CAIR.

          July 27, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heniaith

          I don't know if there were sound recordings at time of asking, but there certainly are now.

          January 7, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KubisFowler

          Germans are upset with their traffic? Let them spend a few days in India...

          April 22, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abc451532

          Is it possible to say "Ich mag nicht den Verkehr" or "Ich mag keinen Verkehr"?

          October 7, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomerisrael

          Can it also refer to Communication?

          August 19, 2014

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaioFranca2

          Verkehr vs Stau, please

          June 18, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
          Mod

            "Traffic" vs "Traffic jam".

            April 14, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krb10

            Stau vs Verkehr?

            June 16, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

            Stau is a traffic jam: when the traffic is moving very slowly or comes to a complete stop.

            Verkehr is traffic in general: vehicles moving, whether quickly or slowly.

            June 19, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fivaz

            Could I say: Ich mag nicht den Verkehr?

            July 18, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

            No -- only if you are going to set up a contrast, e.g. Ich mag nicht den Verkehr, sondern die Stille "It's not the traffic I like but silence".

            July 18, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wibbleypants

            Is the article required for traffic?

            September 8, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DingoBabySaur

            This site drives me nuts. Here is another one I got "wrong."

            Ich mag den Verkehr nicht. = I do not like traffic. Except I got dinged because the idiot software wants "the traffic" = which is literally true but not something any English speaker would say.

            August 1, 2015

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
            Mod

              I would. "My brother likes living in New York, but he doesn't like the traffic".

              January 21, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DingoBabySaur

              Maybe they should add your New York clause to the sentence. Otherwise, my point stands.

              January 27, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AeonMach

              No it doesn't. Come on, you don't have to be a genius to re-construct that to achieve a perfectly sensible usage:
              Man - I don't like living in New York.
              Woman - Why not?
              Man - I do not/don't like the traffic.

              You still convinced this is not something any English speaker would say?
              (Source - am British English speaker for over 4 decades...)

              November 30, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

              I don't think your point stands. You'd have to add another exception for Michigan at least, where I come from, and probably other places as well.

              September 8, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samthebirder

              Like the traffic, I do not, hmmm?

              April 27, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1011370479

              could i say "ich mag nicht den verkehr" is that still acusative

              May 28, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
              Mod

                It's still accusative, but it doesn't sound like a complete sentence.

                Read the link near the top of the page, which explains when to use nicht and where to put it in the sentence.

                In your sentence it sounds like "I like (not the traffic)", i.e. you like something, but it's not the traffic. What is it, then?

                April 14, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisPlatt8

                Why isn't it, "Ich mag keinen Verkehr"? I thought that if there was an object you always use the "kein" form?

                April 14, 2019

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisPlatt8

                Ok, its because of the definite article. My sentence says I don't like traffic (in general)

                April 14, 2019

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

                Exactly.

                kein is only for indefinite objects, not for objects in general.

                April 14, 2019

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrisB06

                I typed in 'I don't like the traffic.' and it said 'Another transilatin: I do not like the traffic'. SAME THING.

                March 15, 2016

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiUutura

                That's standard, duo isn't correcting you, only saying that option would be accepted as well. Not all of the people learning German are completely skilled with English. Quite a few aren't, I think.

                June 18, 2016
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