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https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio

Christmas carols = Christmas songs(?)

ProfesorAntonnio
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Hola a todos. Necesito saber si Christmas songs equivale a Christmas carols. En el curso de español tuve que traducir "Los niños cantan villancicos" entonces escribí "the children sing Christmas songs" pero fue erróneo. Gracias.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/G0108

"christmas carols" es más común.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

en mi diccionario ==> villancico = carol, cancio'n = song

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Hola Antonnio, Typically that would make sense, Christmas Songs and Christmas Carols are essentially the same thing. I think "Carols" is usually used because it refers to what people are meant to do with these songs. People go "caroling", which is to say, they can go door to door and sing these songs.

p.s. It's just one "r". Christmas Carols. :)

p.s.s. I don't know if you are interested in history, but the history of Christmas Carols is pretty interesting if you are: http://www.whychristmas.com/customs/carols_history.shtml

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
Hohenems
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p.p.s. = post postscript

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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Hope....starts?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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doh! the curse of a fast, free wheelin' typist. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
pont
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Hola Antonnio, Typically that would make sense, Christmas Songs and Christmas Carols are essentially the same thing.

To me as a UK English speaker, they're rather different: "Christmas carol" to me means specifically an old, traditional (often religious) song like "Away in a Manger" or "Good King Wenceslas". I wouldn't refer to a modern Christmas song ("Winter Wonderland", "Let it Snow", etc.) as a "carol". But perhaps US English usage is different. (The relevant Wikipedia article also makes a distinction between carols and popular songs.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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American English speaker here, I would make the same distinction. A Christmas song is Jingle Bell Rock, a Christmas carol is Joy to the World.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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see my reply! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Ah, good points pont and AlexisLinguist, and by making my original post referring to fascinating history of carols which includes this shift I think, we have surely exceeded anything the OP cared to hear. (It's fascinating to think of something that feels like an unbroken chain far into the past actually went underground or wasn't celebrated/used at all at times, and then came back, but I digress.) But I think in common speech (and in searching for the right words for DL which needs to be accessible to folks worldwide, and what this was partially about) it is not too hard to use either term alternatively. Songs are songs, though there are many genres of them. I think you use carol when specifically referring to a genre of song, perhaps something older and more traditional, perhaps even religious. But newer songs become old, and older songs get remade, and at a Christmas (or "Holiday") concert you'd seamlessly have a mix of both (intimately connected) genres. Why not do so with casual speech? I have no doubt one would be understood and not troubled by it at all.

My point is that in the US they mix so interchangeably as to easily be seen as one, unless one wants to be highly specific, and one might certainly want to be, but not need to be. ("Hey, let's go Christmas caroling and sing some Christmas songs!" you would hear. "Will will be singing songs or carols Wanda?" not so much. ;) ) Also, in the US, one tends to mix up traditional and new music (and pretty much everything) without much worry. It's kind of "our" thing. And we kinda tend to make "Christmas" into a catch-all holiday that doesn't rule people in or out based upon religion. It's part of the tension of trying to not appear to be publicly endorsing a single religion in the US. (Unlike the kid's public school Holiday Season music concert I went to last year in Switzerland which was totally, and for me noticeably and starkly, only religious and non-inclusive of non-Christians at all.) At least we did so in public school bands where, using the terms in a generic way, we played a mix of these songs for the public. (Perhaps when you experience them altogether they merely feel as one, or at least not necessarily so separate.) Or the times I was taken to old folks homes to sing both of these kinds of songs (they are all songs) alternatively to the elderly to give them some holiday cheer. :) Man, I loved that spirit of warmth and sharing joy with others and I don't think folks minded too much in those precious contemplative and joyous moments, if it was Silent Night or Jingle Bells, a carol or a song, both songs. ;) Just a beautiful blend of people doing their best to light up the world for a time amidst all the tragedies that plague us.

I apologize if my original post was egregiously too imprecise for the particular reader or led anyone tragically astray. ;)

Note to self: Don't DL while having raging insomnia. ;) Stick to lessons, stay out of forums! :)

Happy Holidays one and all! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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And a happy new year. ;)

Considering I have never and will never go caroling in my life (must be a North thing), my viewpoint probably doesn't make any logical sense, but I still differentiate because it bugs me if I don't. We (Americans) should stop generalizing everything. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albrechtion
Albrechtion
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Solo hay un "r" en "carols"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EcaterinaB1

No es lo mismo. Carols viene especialmente canciones de navidad, osea villancicos. Pero songs es una canción común, no tiene nada relacionado con christmas. La frase the children sing christmas songs no puede existir, ya que no tiene sentido.

3 years ago

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