"I feel sick when I see blood."

Translation:Mothaím tinn nuair a bhfeicim fuil.

3 years ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Hopswatch
Hopswatch
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Is a verb always eclipsed, when preceded by "nuair a"? Is there a general rule? (And thanks to the team for not letting it count as an error, but just a type-o, to leave it out)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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To my knowledge, nuair takes a direct relative clause beginning with the particle a, which lenites its verb (in this case, a verb in the present tense that isn’t negated) rather than eclipsing it. An indirect relative clause would cause its verb to eclipse, but I don’t think that nuair can introduce an indirect relative clause.

EDIT: The direct relative particle a doesn’t mutate past indicative autonomous verb forms, or verb forms that begin with d’.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hopswatch
Hopswatch
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So it's an error in the exercise? Anyway, you distinguish between direct and indirect clauses. How can you tell the difference? I'd love to have an example in English if not Irish ;-).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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In my view, yes, it’s an error in the exercise. A relative clause is a subordinate clause that refers back to a word in the primary clause. The difference between a direct relative clause and an indirect relative clause in Irish is that a direct relative clause refers back to a subject or direct object in the primary clause, while the indirect relative clause refers to a genitive or back to a pronoun that itself refers back to the primary clause. An example sentence with both types of relative clauses is Tá an fear a fheicim a dtáinig a bhean chéile ag gáire. (“The man who I see whose wife arrived is laughing.”). Its direct relative clause is a fheicim (“who I see”), and its verb is lenited; its indirect relative clause is a dtáinig a bhean chéile (“whose wife arrived”), and its verb is eclipsed. Both relative clauses refer back to an fear.

3 years ago
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