"Áit."

Translation:Place.

3 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bruadair

I would have pronounced it "Awtch".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sclare92

I agree. English T = Irish Tch and Irish Th = English H

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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I believe the affricate sound ("tch") would be limited to slender T's in Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
AnUnicorn
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But áit has i on one side and nothing on the other; doesn't that make it slender?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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Yes, Bruadair's proposed pronunciation is correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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And is it not limited to only some accents?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsune.yo

Is this the noun, a place, or the verb, to place?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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"Place" just sounds weird. If you hadn't said, I would have guessed the imperative of the verb "to place", although that makes no sense either. It should be "A place" as Irish doesn't use an indefinite article.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silvith

It sounds a little like the Dutch 'oord', an olf-fashioned word for place. In German it is Ort I believe. The sound is somewhat similar, might be useful as a memory aid

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza
JoaoDSouza
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I was asked to write what I heard in the practice Lessons, and I wrote it right. Now that is what I call progress. A month ago, I had problems with the Irish orthography.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oftkiltered
oftkiltered
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This doesn't sound like it would be used on its own like this. Would it be more used to describle a certain place?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It’s used in much the same way that a standalone “Place.” would be used in English; it’s a word translation, not a descriptive sentence of any sort.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

i found this incredible hard to understand. ( i use the Connemara (sub)dialect ) Is this bad pronunciation or is this how it is said in a different dialect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/exeisen
exeisen
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Just wanted to post a mistake I saw in the grammar notes for "questions" here. The example sentence "Does SHE work in the city?" is rendered "An oibríonn TÚ sa chathair?" Should be SÍ.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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Reported it today, just in case you didn't

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/exeisen
exeisen
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Is there a report button for the grammar tips? I only see it in the exercises

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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Just add comment at any exercise and make reference to the "tips and notes" section. The info will certainly find its way to the correct address.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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I thought I was wrong, and I was. I heard it as 'ort.' I couldn't figure out what a part of speech was doing out of its context. Ah well. I'll never forget it now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aglaring

The pronunciation in Forvo is not the same as in the lesson...........see here, please.........there are 3 different pronunciations. http://it.forvo.com/word/%C3%A1it/#ga

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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True, the new speaker pronounces this more like "awts" than "awtch." I believe it is still a clear enough slender T. There seems to be a spectrum of these differences among native speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LouMimzy1
LouMimzy1
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I just want to know when i learn all these words which could be in different dialects will people look at me weird fot switching back or forth or is it common to do so?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarrytheBaird

Im supposed to be able to hear the full stop am I

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Macjory
Macjory
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when did we learn this?? (Obviously, I didn't!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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No worries mate: But this is actually shown as the second from the end word in lesson 1 of Questions, which you maybe skipped?

Lesson 1

cé, cá, bhfuil, cad, cén, fáth, mhéad, áit, céard

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Macjory
Macjory
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I eventually found it. Irish twists my brain into a pretzel. How did people ever learn to use it?? Big question, I know: but are there any linguistic theories about when and why lenition and eclipsis arose?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisTong2

I don't know about Irish, but in Scottish Gaelic, which is very similar to Irish in the written form and in terms of grammar, all the words in a sentence when spoken are mashed together without pause. The initial mutations, along with transformations (e.g., the definite article, synthesized prepositions) in written Gaelic reflect some (but not all!) of the mashing in spoken Gaelic.

2 years ago
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