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  5. "Det tar bara en minut."

"Det tar bara en minut."

Translation:It takes only a minute.

December 11, 2014

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daisythebelle

Is there a difference in Swedish between "it takes only a minute" and "it only takes a minute" ? There is a very subtle difference in meaning; the emphasis on the taking or the minute.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

In Swedish, you could say "det tar bara en minut" or possibly "det tar en minut bara". The latter is very rare though, and not accepted here. You'd have to work with stressing certain words instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daisythebelle

Oh right, thank you!!! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrMarien

Bara -> barely ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fancy__pants

Not really. Barely = Knappt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pacsirat

They are cognates:

"From Old Swedish bara, from Old Norse bara (“barely, only”), from barr, from Proto-Germanic *bazaz (“bare”)."

"From Middle English bare, bar, from Old English bær (“bare, naked, open”), from Proto-Germanic *bazaz (“bare, naked”)."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skrats

So what does "bara" mean when attached to bra? As in "hur mår du?" "Bara bra, tack!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/basiliotimpanaro

Is it literally "only good" as to say " definitely good", i.e. "very good" ? Am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Literally it means 'only good', but it doesn't necessarily mean 'very good', I guess it's more like it points to the absence of anything bad. (admittedly a very small difference)
I think just fine is a perfect translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/person222222

Could one says bara en minut! to mean just a minute! ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B.D.R.

Not very idiomatic. You would say "Ett ögonblick" ("One moment").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

I think it works to use "en minut" to mean "a short while" though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/person222222

Like, in english, "Just a minute" is a short while longer than "one moment" (although not by much), while "just a second" is synonymous to "just a minute". Does it work the same way in Swedish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunnySundquist

...girl, to fall in love...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CapdeBurro

Can "bara" be used about time? As in "Jag har bara ätit frykost" for "I just ate breakfast"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

No, it’s only used in the sense of only, otherwise it’s ”just” or ”precis” or ”nyss”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FLchick

I learned bara from the song Bara fa vär mig själv by Laleh, which I enjoy a lot. I wish I remembered who to give credit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NajdDergham

en minut , why do i hear people say ett minut in many cases ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oYBIxtO

You would normally not hear swedes say ett minut


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/campros

Why not "It will only take a minute"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

That's a possible interpretation. You can't be sure since the Swedish present tense covers more. I'll add it as an accepted answer. – If you want to say this unambiguously, it would be Det kommer bara (att) ta en minut.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/campros

Tack så mycket. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattheworb

I feel like for english swedish learners, understanding it as "it takes just a minute" is more helpful than "it takes only a minute"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OdileBlanv

It barely takes a minute is not accepted. Is there a specific reason for that?

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