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"El verano pasado"

Translation:Last summer

5 years ago

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sylvietr
sylvietr
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Yo sé lo que hiciste...el verano pasado

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Threepercent

Lol, I know what you did last summer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRP87

Sé lo que hicisteis el último verano en España y Sé lo que hicieron el verano pasado en Hispanoamérica

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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In a previous question DL says 'last summer' is 'el pasado verano', not 'el verano pasado'. Can the two words be interchanged and still have the same meaning?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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yes, in this case the position of "pasado" doesn't change the meaning

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timoninatatiana1

itwing, how do we chose between el verano paado and el pasado verano?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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normally the adjetive go after the noum. El verano pasado. It sounds better than El pasado verano, but both are correct. This type of adjetive can be used before or after the nou., because they no change the meaning. You choose.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timoninatatiana1

Ok, it's clear. Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerndErich1

Si, en hora la positiona de posada no es clara del importante.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mernwal

The summer before should be correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adkilmer
adkilmer
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Also 'the summer past'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slemmestad
Slemmestad
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Nope, that's not what the sentence means.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mecasto

Yes, it's exactly what it means. "The summer past" sounds a little strange in English, but it does make sense. For instance, "During the summer past, we visited Ecuador." It does sound a little odd, but it's not incorrect, and it has the same meaning as "el verano pasado visitamos Ecuador."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yahoo3579

All of a sudden I began thinking, "Last Christmas, I gave you my heart, but the very next day, you gave it away. This year, to save me from tears, I'll give it to someone special special"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smallz1025

I put 'the summer passed' because I thought I was learning different tenses. I thought last was 'ultimo'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fire_Temple

ultimo would be last as in final 'The final summer'. Verano pasado means last summer as in "I know what you did last summer'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timoninatatiana1

"The final summer" does not sound English. I am right, native English speakers?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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I disagree. It certainly is not a common phrase (in casual conversation we would say "last" as well), but it's perfectly normal English. ("This is the final summer the camp will be open.") And the phrase was given to you not as the most natural translation, but as a way to distinguish "pasado" and "último." "Pasado" means "last" in the sense of "the one that happened most recently"; "último" means "last" in the sense of "final."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Next_Legend_

It actually sounds kind of dramatic (to me, anyway).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cyareff

I was thinking the same thing. It sounds dramatic but still correct English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Next_Legend_

...The Final Summer....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yahoo3579

...The Summer of the Apocalypse!!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vrphin

The summer past is technically correct

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryHMay

yes it is

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mecasto

Yup.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0_nada

What's the difference ( if there is ) between saying: "El verano pasado" & "El verano último" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Banjaxd

I'm only guessing but " El verano pasado" = The previous summer. "El verano último" = The last summer, as in no more summers

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RianZafe

Tu eres asi verano pasado

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NewfieKine

Would it also be acceptable to drop the "el" and just say "verano pasado" for "last summer"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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No, you need the article in Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DOOMSTAR12

there is no more summers

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annanz01

Does Spanish distiguish between 'the last summer' (In english this would mean that there will never be another summer again) and 'last summer' (which refers to the previous summer) or are they both represented by the same phrase?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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If you mean that there are no more summers, or at least none like you describe ("that was the last summer we went to the cabin"), it's "el verano último."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/midnight27

Summer, is running through the sprinkler in your tee-shirt shoes and jeans...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zapper112
zapper112
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I know what you did ....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iamkiyrx

The name of one of those scary novels

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanboning
hanboning
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verano descends from vēr (Latin for the season spring).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

But spring is "primavera" because, hey look, "prima-" means it comes first.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katydekitty

To remember pasado I think of things passing by so its like the last. (´・ω・`)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave28572

Winter is coming...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MR_SQUIGGLES17

is it the last summer, as in there will be no more summers, or last summer, as in the previous summer?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

It's the previous summer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MR_SQUIGGLES17

gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionradoi1
ionradoi1
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what a sad sentece

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the_vanilla_deer

This sound like a good book title~

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

el navidad pasado... i gave you my heart... pero día muy próxima... you gave it away (99% chance that is incorrect but i tried)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itwing
itwing
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La navidad pasada-- I gave you my heart... pero justo al dia siguiente... you gave it away

Nice try

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DajonOgles

Would it not be: The last summer? "The" doesn't seem to be there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

It would not be.

When "last" is used in English to indicate the most recent of something, it acts like a determiner (a word indicating reference), not an adjective (a word indicating description). So you would no more say "the last summer" in that sense of the word "last" than you would say "the this summer" or "the that summer." To put it another way, "last summer" answers the question "which summer?" as opposed to "what kind of summer?" and such things do not need or allow an article in English.

You could say "the latest summer," "the previous summer," or some similar construction, but it's not so common.

When "last" is used as an adjective, it means "final; without sequel." So "the last summer" would mean the final summer ever, or the final summer in some group of summers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DajonOgles

Gracias! Yo comprendo mejor mucho ahora.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLahkbar

this is obviosly right

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZRaider126

The apocalypse... is coming (school)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdonayMkAd

Yo escuchó en estos musicó:

Cinco Segundos de Verano (5 Seconds of Summer) y Un Dirección (One Direction)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chericher
Chericher
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Why not 'this past summer'? I got that wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

You should report it. "This past summer" means the same thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gail441669

So the sentence is just last summer? Why

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManishPrGupta

What is difference between "Ultimo" & "pasado" and when we should use both.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

In English, "last" can refer to the most recent item in a sequence (even if that sequence is expected to continue). E.g. "It was hot last summer." In Spanish, this case is "el pasado."

But it can also mean the final item in a sequence which is not expected to continue, even if that item is still to occur in the future. E.g. "That will be his last summer before going to college." In Spanish, this case is "el ultimo."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noognag

How would you say "Summer has passed"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robbie886943

why do you have to start with el

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

The real question is why you don't have to start with "the" in English.

Let's start with Determiners. These are words that indicate which thing a noun refers to, like "some," "every," "my," "this," or "that." You may have seen these described as adjectives, but they don't have much in common with ordinary adjectives, which describe things' properties, not their reference.

English and Spanish both generally require a determiner of some sort to introduce the topic noun of a sentence, with some exceptions (like general statements about a whole class of objects, or sentence subjects that are proper nouns). In the case where no other determiner is called for, they use what is called a definite article ("the") or indefinite article ("a/an").

In the English phrase "last summer," the word "last" acts as a determiner. So you don't need to say "the," even though you're talking about a specific summer.

But the word "pasado" in Spanish is just a regular adjective. It basically just means past, or former. When you also say "el," you signal you're talking about a specific past summer, which is understood to mean the most recent one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2cut34u

Whoops I said the summer last

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RileyTreis

Summer lovin' Had me a blast...

7 months ago