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  5. "Tá leabhar agam."

" leabhar agam."

Translation:I have a book.

December 12, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gluubb

This whole time I've been pronouncing it LEE-ah-BAR. Man, the pronunciations help so much. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickgads1

It would be more helpful if I could look up the pronunciations at any time


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninon.de.Lenclos

Scilling the link does not work :-/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

The link does work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melenhawenn

I think there is a similarity here to Breton grammar – Al levr 'zo ganin : A book is with me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferLayne

Why do they translate it when you hover over the word as 'at me' instead of 'have'? Why do they not present 'have' as an optional translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renardo_11

Because “agam” does not mean “have.” “Tá agam” means “I have.” And the only way to translate it word by word is to say “is at me.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelMcD910963

I don't understand this statement an the translations of the words Ta and agam do not suggest the given translation. Please explain this translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarahweave15

how do i know when to include the "a" and when just to say the item.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renardo_11

This seems to be a question about English, not Irish. In English you usually use the article “a” for countable nouns, such as apples, pens, or books. Uncountable nouns auch as sugar, water, or time do not take the indefinite article. Note that they also do not normally form a plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denise763738

Tá can mean "I " and "she"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

never means "I" or "she".

is a verb, equivalent to "am", "are" or "is" (because "be" is an irregular verb in English).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanW807787

Which is I have and you have?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

Irish doesn't have a word for "have", it relies on a combination of the verb ( in the present tense) and the preposition ag. Tá leabhar ag Pól - "Paul has a book".

In Irish, when the object of a preposition is a pronoun, they are combined - ag + produces agam, ag + produces agat, etc. You can look up the full set of "prepositional pronouns" for any preposition by looking up the preposition on teanglann.ie, and checking the Grammar tab. The list for the preposition ag is here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katie338114

How am I to know the word for book when it has not yet been presented?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

How do you expect it to be presented?

Do you know it now?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piispieisme

How do you know whether it means "I have a book" or "I have the book?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The sentence would have an leabhar if “the book” were meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiaHDP

And how would you say: I have books ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Tá leabhair agam. (Leabhair is the plural of leabhar.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fuzulislerhanimi

well, I'm not a native English speaker so I do the same mistake every time I see this kind of sentence. I need to remember that in English, words generally need "a/an"...

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