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https://www.duolingo.com/nastanford

When to start watching Spanish TV?

I am trying to learn Spanish. I took two years in high school and forgot almost all of it. I have restarted here on Duolingo and hope to learn more this time around. I have Spanish speaking friends at my church. I was thinking once I got where I understood more Spanish I could start watching and/or listening to Spanish TV to learn more quickly. How far in the course should I be before I start watching Spanish TV. I don't want to listen and not understand anything... that might make me want to stop listening... any ideas or suggestions? Also one other note... I think I know the answer... shouldn't I only learn ONE language at a time. I have considered learning others as well but I think I should wait until I have Spanish down first. Newbie (thanks)

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tara668
tara668
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I think that watching Spanish TV, made for people who speak Spanish, is going to be way too fast in general. It might be better to start with something that's more geared for beginners, like http://learner.org/series/destinos/ or http://www.celebratelanguages.com/esextra.html . Then start trying out the real Spanish stuff as you become more comfortable with listening.

You can always try it anytime of course, but if it's over your head, these are some ideas.

Another idea to help bridge the gap: I have some movies that I love and I've watched a million times in English, and I can pretty much recite all the lines (yeah, people love that). Anyway, I've found that some of them have a Spanish Language option, so I've started watching them again, in Spanish (I have the DVDs, but the library here also has an impressive collection.) It really helps to know what they're saying already, not needing to look at subtitles, but actually knowing the content. Doing it that way, I notice that I start to catch more and more of the words and grammatical constructions that I've learned.

Good luck and have fun!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moshen244
moshen244
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I agree with the suggestion of Destinos. I am one-third of the way through the series and enjoying it immensely. It hasn't quite gotten too hard for me yet, and therefore it's encouraging and enjoyable rather than frustrating, as watching the Spanish news would be for me now.

Duolingo says I can understand 75% of all Spanish now, according to where I am on the Duolingo tree. That's highly misleading, because if 1)If all you know is all the little words and the common verbs but don't know any specialized vocabulary, you can't follow very much at all of real news or real conversation and 2)If the speed is too fast for you, you won't feel like you are understanding anything.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlieKat

Ive been trying to find a TV show for beginners myself, Destinos looks like something Ive been looking for, thanks so much! I also second watching a movie you've seen a million times in Spanish, Mulan was the first I tried and it really helped me when I was struggling to understand possessive form and the way adjectives are placed differently.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Yesterday. NOW. Tomorrow.

Ayer, AHORA! Manaña.

Give yourself a good reason why you should wait. I'll give you 5 reasons why you should start now.

  • Watching a short news clip is effortless. All you have to do is sit and listen.
  • You need to get used to listening to the language. Is there a better medium than television? Ok, human beings are underrated . . . you can always eavesdrop, or spy on Spanish speakers. Or you can say ¡hola!
  • Listening to Jorge Ramos interview on CNN will help you get used to how words should sound and how they're properly pronounced.
  • Listening to the bible in Spanish is enriching. It's free. It may help you get a better understanding of the Word.
  • Ok, I really don't have a 5th reason but there are many quotes online that I can borrow about listen as an effective skill for language acquisition. Many babies practice listening to learn their 1st language.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LorenzoCabrini

I'd say start immediately. Even if you don't understand a word, you are helping your ears to gradually get used to the sounds of the langauge as well as its rhythm. You are slowly going to start being able to distinguish where words begin and end.

I use both an active and a passive approach to listening/watching. The active approach has me listening carefully to whatever material I have decided to use. I carefully select these so that they should be challenging but not over the top. I make a concerted effort to understand what is said, looking words up when I have to. I add new vocabulary words to my anki deck for the language I'm studying to kick off the review process of that word. (I don't add words to anki, but short phrases uses the word in context)

The passive approach means that I listen to my target language passively for a number of hours a day. I do this while I'm doing other things. Remember that very young children are bombarded with language while they are playing. You may think they're not paying attention, but they are.

I even listen to the target language while I sleep. Well, at least when the kids are with their mother. When they are with me, their likely to think their dad is losing it bigtime, so I pretend to be a normal person for a while.

Regarding your second question, only you can answer that question. Yes, there are many people that successfully learn multiple languages at a time. But there are other people who don't feel comfortable doing that. If you feel ready to try a second language, go ahead! If it works, great. If you feel that you get confused and/or stressed, just put the second one on hold.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moogy
moogy
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Try Euronews. It is available in English and Spanish and has transcripts available to read up on what you've watched for some articles.Also the news items are short so you'll build up vocab on short stories or items and have an English version to check against. Then you can more on to longer move difficult topics.

http://es.euronews.com/

Good Luck.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I teach beginning ELAA to adults. I tell them to start listening to English language broadcasts (TV, radio, you tube, whatever) from the first day. No, you won't understand more than a few words at first, but you'll get used to the language rhythm. You'll understand a little more every week (or even day). And they can be fun, particularly if you choose children's shows, cooking shows, documentaries and other shows where the narrative fits the picture well. But just turning on the TV or the radio in your new language while you do something else is helpful.

I'm actively learning Spanish, Portuguese through Spanish and Dutch. I'd do more, but time is an issue. I'd wait until the second or third checkpoint on the newest language you're working on before going into another

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gomos

About the second question: many people are successfully learning several languages at the same time, including myself. I don't think it poses a problem, especially if there is not much similarity. If the similarity is very big, it might generate some general confusion and maybe a few mix-ups. So if your studying Spanish, maybe it would be better to avoid for now Portuguese, Catalan or Italian.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I watch Venezuelan TV on Viki. I watch an episode with English subtitles, then again without. I look forward to the day when I can turn them off, but for now, I like my crutch.

3 years ago