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"Yes, you're welcome!"

Translation:¡Sí, de nada!

2
5 years ago

161 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rich__K
Rich__K
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So 'nada' means 'to swim', 'nothing' and can be used with 'de' to say 'you're welcome'?!

brain explode

107
Reply25 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zombiebreakfast

for 'de nada', I find it's easier just to translate it literally and then decipher the meaning. so the literal translation of 'de nada' would be 'of nothing' - kind of like saying, 'it's nothing' or 'no problem'. I don't know if that's what they mean, but that's how I remember it.

123
Reply44 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rich__K
Rich__K
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That's helpful, thanks.

14
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kotgee

ah ok, so then to actually say 'you're welcome' you'd use bienvenido (as suggested when you hover over the word 'nada' in the sentence...)?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yurril

No, bienvenido is said when you welcome someone into a home or gathering, it has more of a feeling of "come in, or join us".

29
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kotgee

I see, thanks for that

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AniketSWaghmare

Loved the way you've explained it...

1
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kleahy7

That's what I use too! You, good sir, may now receive a gift of Lingots!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sparklequeen2003

I still dont get it

-5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilach123

It's also my sign lol

-6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vontrecebr

I know rite thats how i feel to.

-6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yugboy1

No, but you're close. What you were thinking was Nadar, which is "To swim". This translation means "of nothing"

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FabricioPaschoal

I'ts like when americans say " sure, dont mention "

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yurril

nadar means to swim, the present third person conjugation is "nada". "De nada" as a phrase has nothing to do with swimming.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CrimsonCorona10

With any Language, dont learn it by plugging in words and sentences. This will only confuse you, just learn the rules native to the language and you will be fine.

It does look like swim, but using context will help figure out what the sentences mean or how they are being used.

Like when you learned your first language as a baby-child, you only learned how to speak, not grammar until later. Hope this helps

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carebear556545

nadar means swim but congegated its nada

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Porchia7

Right, i was confused

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duhitheuni

'de nada' kind of means 'its nothing', so another way to say your welcome?

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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Yes, "swims" and "nothing" are both spelled the same in Spanish (nada).

The phrase "de nada" means "you are (you're) welcome" which is one of several responses you can say when someone thanks you. It does not mean you are welcoming someone to your home or business.

"El hombre nada solo pero no come nada cuando nada solo." (The man swims alone but only eats nothing when he swims alone.)

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OrianaLopez
OrianaLopez
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I put it mor easy, it use to To swin and for Nothing, then when we say De nada we say For Nothing, it means, the please was makes for nothing

-2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irule2

Cool

-2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrunalPatel15289

Haha agree with you..

-2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrunalPatel15289

Haha agree with you... Nada is confusing

-2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dandylion4

I feel the same ?!?!

-2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melvinhc

Very interesting the Spanish language

-3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cbartist

Fhdjdjcnejnxnsnncnjd

-6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IHX
IHX
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In Costa Rica, the correct phrase is con gusto or con mucho gusto

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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It has a lot of synonyms in Spanish. Besides as "con mucho gusto" (glady), can also said as "cómo no" (how could not), "no hay de qué" (there is no reason of that), "no hay por qué" (there is no reason why), "ni lo mencione" (don't mention it), "no me lo agradezca" (don't thank me it), "no me des las gracias" (don't give me thanks), "es un placer" (it's a pleasure), "encantado de..." (glad of), "fue un placer" (it was a pleasure), "no es necesario" (it's not necessary), "ni lo digas" (don't even say that), etc.

11
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewEisenberg

Yep. Still wrong. That's what I wrote. Living in Costa Rica now, and no one says 'de nada'.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Star--Butterfly

because the flag is Spanish and that means you have to write as an Spanish person not like a person from Costa Rica

-1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam435605

What DO they say?

-1
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puravida77

I also wrote con mucho gusto and was marked wrong

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redgamer203

Si

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redgamer203

Si persona

-1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leetann
leetann
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Are you not allowed to "tu' eres"

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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It's not literal. If you translate it literally as "tú eres bienvenido" that means "you are good received in my home". The phrase means "of nothing", used next to when someone give you thanks.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArkansasAl

Yes,"no hay de qué" is another way of saying "You are welcome". The literal translation of this phrase does not make much sense in English, but the general meaning is "nothing to thank for." It is common in latin america. Just like in English, there are lots of ways of sending the same meaning. Check out http://www.wikihow.com/Say-You're-Welcome-in-Spanish - it's a decent article.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayhemSan

"Por nada" and "De Nada" I thought were interchangable?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haleeusa

I did too. My Spanish teacher told us "por nada" is what we should say because it is more formal, whereas "de nada" is used among friends and people you're familiar with. Was my teacher wrong?!?

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayhemSan

That's what I thought too but it marked por nada as incorrect

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haleeusa

I choose it as well and it was wrong. Would someone clarify this for us?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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It's a regionaly use. Some use one, some use the other one, and some use both for formal and informal situation like you said.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1236547896541230

you are sexy

-1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Star--Butterfly

por nada can be used in lots of different ways you can say ¿por qué haces eso? (why do you do that) por nada,(you are doing it without a reason,but if you say gracias por nada (the same person says the whole thing)it means you are not really saying thank you, but i never use it as your welcome, de nada is used with everyone not only with friends and family.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArkansasAl

why not "no hay de que"?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yugboy1

that means "no there of what?" I don't get how you got it

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Alvina-

It's a fixed phrase, idiomatically meaning something like "it's nothing", or "think nothing of it". It's what I learned in school; not sure why Duolingo doesn't like it.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Star--Butterfly

why not means ¿por que no?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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@ArkansasAl:

Yugboy1 tried to answer your question by trying to transliterate it... it doesn't work like that with your sentence.

"No hay de que" is the shortened version of "No hay de que darme las gracias." = (There is no need to say thanks.) It's a nice way of saying "You are (you're) welcome" after you are thanked.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prsni.p

i seriously dont get the inverted exclamation point before 'Si' whats it for?is it part of the spanish alphabet or what?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IHX
IHX
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In Spanish, questions and exclamations are introduced by upside-down question or exclamation marks and followed by normal question and exclamation marks. The argument for this is that it prepares readers to use the correct intonation pattern, so words that are not included in the interrogatory or exclamatory intonation pattern lie outside the signs.

16
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/misseri1989

Thank you! I had the same question and your answear was really helpful! :)

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BhavMeister

You can also do yes, you are welcome or you're welcome

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mymagicword

In long ago high school Spanish class, we were taught to respond, "El gusto es mio." Is that no longer commonly used?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harleycc

Maybe, but maybe not

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Star--Butterfly

that is right el gusto es mio is the same as de nada but it is more formal

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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"El gusto es mio." = "The pleasure is mine."

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lili_walker

I'm Hispanic and I always say nada and never bienvenido

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lili_walker

im Hispanic and I always say de nada and never bienvenido.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasOls

Why is "sí, tú eres bienvenido" wrong?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yurril

I'm copying and pasting my earlier comment for you ~ No, bienvenido is said when you welcome someone into a home or gathering, it has more of a feeling of "come in, or join us".

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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Because it hasn't got the same meaning in Spanish as in English phrase.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Star--Butterfly

because spanish people do not really use that type of vocabulary,I don't know if that exists but to say welcome they use bienvenido

-1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NormanBerry

Your own system suggested USTEDES.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pointsnorth

a good translation, i think, would be: "Si, por nada!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yumi.V
Yumi.V
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It's the same. THere are a lot of ways to say that in Spanish.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eddie.ogra1

Am I the only one who learned this phrase from Dora the Explorer before using this app? Lol

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AcornSchool

This works well for me it sometimes can be a little hard. I know know some basic words. (I have not completed it yet)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goochylynn

Si es bienvenido was accepted by DL

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harleycc

Well this is good for your brain so I think that even if you say you dont get it you really do because its in your mind and you know its there. So if this comes up on a test tell yourself,"You can do it!"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David892810

I have an android phone yo do these lessons on an it keeps reminding me about the accents. I have the Spanish keyboard turned on, but it ONLY has ñ and no other accents. Does anybody know how to correct this?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Antonia100eva

Hold your finger on the letter and you'll get some other options for that letter.

1
Reply2 years ago