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"There are only a few days left before the end of the year."

Translation:Quedan sólo unos cuantos días antes del fin de año.

5 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

So, is "hay" = there is and "quedan" = there are? Is it as simple as that?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_M_
_M_
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It is quite simple indeed. Unfortunately, that is not the rule :)

a) "hay" is the 3rd person singular of the verb "haber"

b) "quedan" is the 3rd person plural of the verb "quedar"

c) "there is one apple" = "hay una manzana" // "there are three apples" = "hay tres manzanas"

d) "there is one apple left" = "queda una manzana" // "there are three apples left" = "quedan tres manzanas"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

Ah, I get it! There is, there remains. Of course! Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielinform

Excellent summary Sallyann_54!

Hay = There is / There are

Queda = There remains (singular)

Quedan = There remains (plural)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Can the phrase "quedan tres manzanas" be written as "tres manzanas quedan"? Or does quedan always come before the object? Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_M_
_M_
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Yes, it could be written like that. It is a less frequent order but it is correct nevertheless.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s_helmer

Thanks, think I get it. Really needed the explanation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michel-Ange Chevry

Thanks. I think I get it now. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.j.banks

no, 'quedan' is an implication that the days are waiting/remaining.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

For unos vs unos cuantos - my dictionary shows 'a few' as "algunos, algunas, una o dos, unas, unas cuantas, uno o dos, unos, unos cuantos, algunos pocos, un manojo de, unas pocas, unos pocos"

What rules apply for unos or unos cuantos in the context we've been given?

And is 'del fin de año' literally 'el fin de el año' contracted to 'del fin de año'. If so interesting contraction.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_M_
_M_
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Regarding the translation of "a few", I would say that your dictionary is correct :) The general meaning is the same: "an undetermined amount of elements, but most likely more than 1". The differences between all the flavors (algunos, algunas, una o dos, unas, unas cuantas, uno o dos, unos, unos cuantos, algunos pocos...) are gender information, if the undermined number is low ("uno o dos", "algunos pocos"), high ("unos cuantos"), or you have no idea at all ("algunos", "unos"). "Un manojo de", means something like a fistful (i.e. the amount that you can have in your closed hand).

As a rule, I would use "unos cuantos" if I want to express that the amount is bigger than "unos".

Regarding the contraction, it is not. "el fin del año" is the contraction to "el fin de el año". You would use that to express the period of time that is close to the end of the year. "del fin de año" = "del" + "fin de año" where "fin de año" is a particular and concrete time of the year (the night of 31st of December).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Is there some reason that "algunos días" is not accepted?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Orb
Orb
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Why del fin de ano and not del fin del ano?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_M_
_M_
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To me, as someone from Spain, "fin de año" is an expression itself of a particular and concrete moment: the night of 31st December. However, "el fin del año" means to me "the last weeks/days of the year".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alejandro.AH

Im native spanish speaker too, and I wrote "de fin de año" instead of "del fin de año" because we use more the first way here, it should be considered by duolingo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robth

Great! thanks for that. I learn something new every day!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s_helmer

Would it be correct to use the verb "Faltan" in this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laruthell

Yes, "faltan" should be fine.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

I put 'faltan' as it's the verb I would normally use but it was marked incorrect

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laruthell

Did you report an error?

I was realizing, I would be more likely to use "faltan" with an exclamation point, and "quedan" with a period. With "faltan" it feels to me like you are really excited for next year and can hardly wait for it to finally be here. With "quedan" it sounds a little more like you are worried about all the things you still have to do before it gets here and time is running out. Does it feel that way to you too, or is it just me? That could be the reason why Duolingo does not accept "faltan". Perhaps "faltan sólo unos cuantos días para el fin de año" is better translated "there are just a few days left until the end of the year!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

Yes I reported it. Sorry but I don't agree with what you say above. Or perhaps I didn't go into it in such detail. It's just that 'faltan' I more natural for me to use.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/August18
August18
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"Sobran solo unos dias" sounds odd, does it? I agree quedan is better but would anyone naturally say sobran?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_M_
_M_
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It does not sound odd at all. However, it is a completely different meaning. "Sobran sólo unos días" means that there are a few more days than those that can be used. For instance, let's say that you have a deadline to meet and you finish a couple of days sooner, then "sobran unos días". "Quedan" comes from the verb "quedar" and "sobran" from "sobrar".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/August18
August18
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Yes, it makes sense. Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottrobertssatx

Sobran sounds like the remaining days are leftovers (awkward, I think)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/legs99
legs99
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Que pasa con 'sólo faltan pocos días....'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkyGreen

Why cuantos and not pocos?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dtturman
dtturman
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When do you use solo instead of solomente and vice versa?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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They are interchangeable. Except, of course, when "solo" means alone. There is a rule that we learnt in school to put accents: If you can write "solamente" where you see "solo" then "sólo" has an accent. Now this rule is obsolete, RAE says that solo mustn't accentuate ever, but many people use still old rule and write "sólo" when it means "solamente".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

solamente was marked incorrect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mawileboy
mawileboy
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So "antes del fin" was right, but I used "hasta el fin" and it was marked wrong. Should this be acceptable, too, or am I wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gearforce

Is it fine to use "algunos dias" instead of unos or it is incorrect, and if so, why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottrobertssatx

Sólo faltan unos pocos días hasta el fin del año - another right answer ridiculously counted wrong

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
Dmitry_Arch
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Why can't we say "Estamos solo a pocos dias del fin del ano"? Doesn't it mean the same thing? Why does DL always insists on literal tranlation? And why is it "de ano" and not "del ano"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laruthell

"Estamos sólo a pocos días del fin del año." = "We are only a few days away from the end of the particular year."

"Quedan sólo unos cuantos días antes del fin de año." = "There are only a few days left before the end of the year."

Yes, the meaning is quite similar, although the tone is different. Either would have its place in ordinary conversation. I expect Duolingo prefers a literal translation because, A, it is impractical to try to include all of the potentially hundreds of different ways you can say close to the same thing, and B, it's probably harder for Duolingo's metric to figure out how well you have learned the words/grammar/whatever in a given skill if you are making up your own ways of saying things rather than translating the words. Also, it's just really good practice to try to translate things literally sometimes, because some phrases work, and others don't. It forces us to learn to recognize English idioms we might otherwise take for granted.

As for why it's "de" not "del" . . . Think of "fin de año" as a generic phrase meaning "year end" just as "fin de semana" is a generic phrase meaning "weekend." That's just how it's said. My impression is that in Spanish, if you add a definite article, you get the same effect as if you heavily emphasized the "the" in English (the end of THE year). It sounds like the year (or week) referred to is some particular, special year.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kar-lijntje

Why does this exercise come up within this theme.It does not match in my opinion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ricardo650353

Why is it unos quantos dias? Some many days? Sounds redundant. Shouldn't it be pouco? That means a few.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellenkeyne
ellenkeyne
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Are you confusing your Spanish and your Portuguese? (I do that more often than I'd like.) In Spanish, it's "pocos días" (I used that and was marked correct) or "unos cuantos días."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lani_Mo
Lani_Mo
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Hi. Could you say..... Quedan unos pocos días hasta/antes del fin de semana?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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You could, but that would say: There are a few days left before the weekend.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiserableMe
MiserableMe
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why didnt ""hay solo unos cuantos dias antes de la fin del ano"" work?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Works in English, but I think "Quedan" is necessary in Spanish to say that the days are left/remaining. Also "fin" is masc. so "del" not "de la".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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This is answered above. You need the verb quedar which means to stay or remain. Hay = There is or There are.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackie.burhans

Where does "left" fit in? The question asks us to translate "There are only a few days left before..." and I don't believe the translation they provided includes "left". I only ask because in other questions where I leave details like this out, I get it wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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"Quedan" = "There are [such and such] left"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Florakookypants

Thanks for the explanation of "del fin de año" , interestingly my correct answer said "del fin del año" but I understand the subtle difference

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dianneja

Confusing! As a "learner" Hay...means there are/are there. Translating...means you have to forget there are and try and remember...there remains! Confusing..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

I put "Sólo unos cuantos días quedan antes del fin del año," and it was not accepted. I'm wondering if this is a really awkward word order or if it might actually be okay? If I were using the verb "remain" in English that's where I would put it in the sentence, so I was surprised when it didn't work.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laruthell

I can't find anything wrong with it myself, but I think "Quedan sólo..." sound more natural. Spanish often puts the subject after the verb. For example, if I wanted to say, "Look what David brought!" I would never even consider saying, "¡Mira lo que David trajo!" It sounds very clumsy indeed. I would say, "¡Mira lo que trajo David!" Somehow that just puts the emphasis in the right place. I'm sorry I can't explain any grammatical rules about this. It's just something you have to assimilate from reading/hearing real Spanish from native speakers.

Edit: Just in case it wasn't clear, I myself am not a native speaker either; I learned Spanish while living abroad a few years. In lieu of that, I suppose the aptly named "immersion" section of Duolingo will have to do.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

It's such a hard thing to catch on to. I often reverse subject and verb, but I find that the times I do, DL often doesn't. I can never see a pattern. Wishing I spent time around Spanish speakers so that I could better absorb more of those things!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DutchRafa
DutchRafa
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Why not ' Ya solo quedan un par de dias antes del fin del año'...? Too free...? :-/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blackarican121

What's the difference between solo y solamente

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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The adverbs "sólo" (the accent is only necessary where confusion with the adjective "solo" may exist) and "solamente" are interchangeable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaymondElFuego

"Solo existe unos días más hasta el fin del año"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mstanding

How many diverse meanings can one word have? So far, "quedar" can be used to mean staying somewhere, meeting up with people and now apparently it also means something left or remaining...are there more?

2 months ago