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  5. "Tá m'fhear céile foirfe."

" m'fhear céile foirfe."

Translation:My husband is perfect.

December 12, 2014

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duliGirl

Nice to see Pól taking advantage of the marriage referendum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scadwyn

Said no one ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nyelvlany

why is not it "m'fhear chéile"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

This will be explained later in the Genitives skill.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nyelvlany

Alright. Go raibh maith agat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Macanscian

Has anyone heard it used in practice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maedbhlynch

An-ghreannmhar. Have a lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/songoftheskies

Why is it m'fhear céile instead of mo fhear céile?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Because <fh> is silent in Irish, and mo becomes m' before vowel sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peanutandjelly41

"Practically perfect in every way."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cinzia47

Foirfe? I gcomhair cad, go díreach?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lg72xx
  • 1396

...in his own mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffFoster14

Perhaps the speaker is a widow, using 'perfect' in the grammatical sense: completed and in the past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

It could also mean that he's mature. She's trained him properly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris346815

The sentence is in the present tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouMimzy1

Never have to worry about remembering this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Czesiunia

Am I correct to assume that the use of 'tá' instead of 'is' suggests that he is perfect only momentarily and not always?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FoxyAuroraBat

"Tá" is always used for adjectives, while "is" is only used to identify. You can say "Is buachaill deas é", because you're identifying the boy as a "nice boy" rather than just describing him as nice. You could say "Tá an buachaill go deas" (not sure about the usage of "go" quite yet), meaning "The boy is nice" because the boy is being described as nice. There's a fine line between the two, but I hope this helped a little. I probably could've described it better... :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FoxyAuroraBat

Tá failte romhat! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asskrha1234

duirt mo bhean chéile


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KittDunne

This is a phrase I plan to use frequently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hec10tor

how do you say sarcasm is irish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Irish doesn't need a word for sarcasm.

/s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hec10tor

To be honest I don't know any Irish people (I live in Mexico), but I've always imagined that they would have a sarcastic streak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

We do - that was the whole point of my reply :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hec10tor

I suppose Irish doesn't have a word for gullible either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

:-)

To answer your original question, the NEID offers two suggestions for "sarcasm":
tarcaisne which the FGB translates as "Contempt, scorn; affront, insult" or
searbhas, which the FGB gives as "Bitterness, sourness, acidity".

As you can see, neither of them are entirely appropriate for describing my tongue-in-cheek response, which might be better described as magúil - " Mocking, jeering, jesting" :-)

saonta or somheallta can be used for "gullible".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zee-money

My perfect husband is somehow wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1255

"My perfect husband" doesn't have a verb - Tá mo fhear céile foirfe does have a verb. The two sentences aren't equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KellyManni3

Worth learning Irish just to say this to my husband. G'awwww!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hec10tor

for hahahaha, in Irish does one write thathatha?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anise1105

Thank you so much for rubbing it in Duo... xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brenda635466

That is what I wrote but it says I am wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Codester3

My wife is having a hard time remembering this sentence, so I’m trying to say it for her as often as possible.

How would I say “YOUR husband is perfect”? Would it be Tá d’fhear céile foirfe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Codester3

Just bumping this question...

My question probably sounds tongue-in-cheek, but I really do want to know whether this is the right way to frame this sentence.

TIA!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1255

With the emphasis suggested by your "YOUR", it would be tá d'fhear céilese foirfe, but tá d'fhearsa foirfe might be easier.

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