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"La niña tiene los ojos del padre y la nariz de la madre."

Translation:The girl has the father's eyes and the mother's nose.

5 years ago

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

In Spanish as well as other languages an article is often used where we would use a possessive personal pronoun in English. I agree with the other commenters that "her father" and "her mother" should be accepted, because that is the more natural way to refer to one's parents.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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Accepted on 2014.10.05.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ftayim11

as of today 4/26/2017 her father is not accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

With respect, unless you have a reference that supports your assertion for this particular case, I believe you and everyone else who apparently agrees with you are wrong.

When speaking of one's parents or the parents of others, you use the possessive pronouns - "mi madre," "tu tía," "mis padres," etc. when that is what you mean. Why is it suddenly different now? Obviously, you and everyone else is free to translate "the" to "her" without loss of meaning. Well, it's actually a little more specific, since we haven't really identified exactly which father and mother have been singled out. But that's probably okay.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/withak

The situation sounds pretty grim.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Forven_91

After finishing the last Hannibal season… there is nothing innocent about this sentence. :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

Los ojos y la nariz esta en la refrigeradora. Ella va a comerlos con las alubias fava. Pero había quedaba sin chianti desde la noche pasada.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EgwuekweChima

Loool

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merrydew

The reference to Frankenstein is just too strong :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerKDavis
RogerKDavis
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I put "the girl has her father's eyes and her mother's nose" and it was marked incorrect. Does anyone know why?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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It is accepted now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeedleBoo

Because the world is a cruel and unfair place.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K1MJONGUNations

reality slap

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I guess that was because in the Spanish sentence the articles "el" (del) and "la" are used instead of the possessive "su". The sentence you suggest would be: La niña tiene los ojos de su padre y la nariz de su madre.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathlover1

that makes sense, but one of the correct translations showed THE father and HER mother, when it is "el" (del) and "la". Why aren't they the same since it's both definite articles in Spanish?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kassandra8286
kassandra8286
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I agree, and I reported it. "Her" father/mother is a more natural-sounding English translation of this sentence than "the" father/mother anyway, and as you noted, Duo's "correct" translation is not consistent.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I have no idea, I would say that is incorrect.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeHookham

It doesnt refer to HER parents specifically so technically should be 'the father' and 'the mother'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I don't think anyone gets their eyes and nose from somebody else's father and mother. In Spanish, they use la/el instead of his/her for body parts and clothing, http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/possadj.htm, and maybe that applies to anything that obviously belongs to the person.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yasmin346798

It s not accepted 01.04.17

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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What's the most natural in English.

The girl has her father's eyes and her mother's nose/ The girl has the father's eyes and the mother's nose?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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The version with "the father" sounds clinical and impersonal; it might be said by people doing genetic research.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Yes, they should put the one by default as the one with "her".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

The first one sounds more natural to me. If I was saying this I would probably leave out the second "her" and just say: The girl has her father's eyes and mother's nose. (I don't know if it's grammatically correct to leave it out, but it sounds fine to me)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Thanks! I tried it, "The girl has her father's eyes and mother's nose" was accepted!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/withak

They both sound fine, but saying "her" is more common in my experience.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

"The girl has her father's eyes and her mother's nose" was marked correct today 6-21-2014

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrotaylor

how can 'del padre' translate to 'the father' when 'la' translates to 'her mother' ? why not 'su' please explain !!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"del padre" literally translates to "of the father" and "de la madre" translates to "of the mother". Spanish often uses "the" where we would use a possessive pronoun like "her" in English. So far I have seen it most for body parts, but I guess it is also used for other things like parents where it is obvious that "el padre" is talking about "her" father.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

This is a medical diagnosis?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

That was my first thought also. They seem to have dumped body parts into the "Medical" lessons. I guess it makes some sense. It would be hard to communicate with a doctor without knowing names for body parts, but I'd have been happier with more thorough lessons on body parts and on common medical terms. They both have a lot of vocabulary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kabu3200

"The girl has the layers of fat of the father and the nose of the mother." I'll try that next time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanScrivener

'the girl has the father's eyes and the mother's nose' should NOT be accepted. You would NEVER say that in English! It is HER father's eyes and HER mother's nose.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Your opinion should NOT be accepted as my opinion. I MIGHT say that in English!!! (I'll see your one exclamation mark and raise you two.) It seems your issue is with the Spanish sentence, not the English translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/darkjedioverlord

She keeps them in a jar by her bed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cracovian
Cracovian
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Now she is planning to obtain her grandma's ears...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machamaria

First, I want to say the DuoLingo folks who read and deal with all our corrections are patron saints--thank you! Thank you for your time and effort.

Second, since so many of the DL users are lenguaphiles (sp?) would any one know the etymology of english "eye" ? RAE says «ojo» derives from Latin oculus. It sort of looks like "eye" derives from ojo. Anyone know?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoosCanN
LoosCanN
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I knew that "eye" comes from the Anglo-Saxon side of English, rather than the Latinate Norman French, and has the same Germanic roots as the German word for eye: Auge. But digging a little, I found out that both "ojo" and "eye" come from the Proto-Indo-European root word for eye. So they are indeed related. (And nariz and nose from the PIE word "nas.") Etymology's a hoot!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

And... if you know that another word for "nostrils" is "nares," in English, then "nariz" is Spanish is just a gimme. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrittanyDi15

I said the girl child bc i didnt know if i should Child or girl and it said it was wrong :c I was afraid to take the risk

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billianlicknell

It is still not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

Miss Frankenstein?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maimonauro

I was marked wrong when I put "the nose of the mother" instead of "the nose of her mother". Aren't both grammatically correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akstnhm
akstnhm
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...from the father and ...from the mother is incorrect in english?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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If you're asking about using "from", then it's correct to say "She has her eyes from her father and her nose from her mother".

If you're asking about using "the", it would be correct if we were talking in general terms as biologists, or if we were talking about a non-pet animal. But if we're talking about a person or a pet, we'd use "his" or "her".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akstnhm
akstnhm
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thank you so much

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeedleBoo

"del padre" but not "del madre"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Nope. It's "el padre" and "la madre" so it would be "de el padre" and "de la madre", but "de el" always gets merged into "del".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ninabina87

The microphone didn't give me enough time!!!!!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arsha123
Arsha123
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Mother's nose, huh?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

I think it was rather cute that they paired the masc. "ojos" with the father and the fem. "nariz" with the mother. Sort of subtle way to help us remember the gender for the two new words. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Z3dgerino
Z3dgerino
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Me quedó claro todo esto ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

We know Spanish uses possessive pronouns for parents. The fact that they have not done so here, suggests the proper translation should be "the father" and "the mother" rather than "her father" and "her mother."

I see that nearly everyone objects to that usage and translation, but I have not found any reference to suggest it should be interpreted otherwise. If anyone has such a reference, please share it with the rest of us.

Clearly, most of us refer to our parents and the parents of those we know with a possessive pronoun. Using a definite article does sound a little too impersonal. Perhaps, the same is not true in Spanish.

Personally, instead of mounting a crusade to correct every imagined slight embodied in the English translation, I'd rather try to understand (a) the extent to which Spanish has the apparent emotional baggage that English does when using definite articles instead of possessive pronouns, and (b) whether using a definite article to refer to parents operates the same as it does for things like clothing and body parts.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingoEd16
LingoEd16
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I wrote "de" as "from", is it actually incorrect? Why was I marked wrong?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minagabro

So her father can't see , and her mother can't smell Pobres padres ..

5 months ago