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"La tensión es alta."

Translation:The tension is high.

0
5 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Why is this not "La tensión está alta" since I assume that it refers to a condition rather than a characteristic? Perhaps this is one of those sentences wherein either es or está would be acceptable?

20
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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You need to consider that the tension in this phrase is not tension in general, it is a specific period of tension. "The tension (from this moment to this moment) was high". That is why it is ser, because being high is what defines that tension.

Tension would need to have a continual or real presence to qualify for está, but instead it is a thing that just occurs and each occurrence has its own qualities that define it, so ser.

11
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carnaedy
CarnaedyPlus
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Being high is a definite characteristic of the tension, therefore it is used with "es".

4
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabramsohn
jabramsohn
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All adjectives are characteristics of the nouns they describe; the question is whether it's in inherent characteristic (i.e. the tension is always high) or a temporary one (the tension is high right now, but it isn't necessarily always high).

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carnaedy
CarnaedyPlus
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Death is very permanent, but it is a state, not a definition, and thus in Spanish you say "Él está muerto", never "es". Why? Because being dead does not define him as a person. On the other hand, you always use "es" with professions, despite how temporary they are, because in Spanish they are considered to be definitive. "Él es actor", never "está".

In the end you can argue that these distinctions (definition vs state of being) are arbitrary, and you would not be wrong, but that's how they are made in Spanish, not through temporary/permanent aspect that learners with the background of English language are so enthralled with.

12
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shawn637253

So for this we xannot translate tension to voltage here correct?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PianistKevin
PianistKevin
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you use ser for a state of fact. Estar is only for location or condition. since tension is intangible, there really isn't much condition, and tension isn't located somewhere, so ser is appropriately used in this case

2
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryanlounsberry

I thought the same fluent 2b. Have you discovered the reason yet ?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saranasser6

Es comes from the verb ser, and está is a form of estar. Ésta can be translated to this, but it does not need the tilde anymore (she.he., it can always be written as esta)

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustineElizabeth

Why does it not accept "the stress is high"?

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Stress = estrés; I think DL confuses people giving so many words as synonyms when they are only interchangeable in really few occasions...

12
Reply25 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lexx_it
lexx_it
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I haven't tried, but I believe "the voltage is high" also should be accepted

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstebanD.G

The correct translation for "the voltage is high" is "el voltaje es alto" "tension" could be stress or if you want to be specific is "tension electrica" I'm native speaker :)

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/C-Jon

I think this (high-voltage wires, a.k.a high-tension wires, even in English) is the only meaning that sounds natural. At first I thought it might be supposed to describe a social scenario (such as "tensions are high') but that seems pretty odd in Spanish.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

i think pressure is correct too. My doctor (here in Spain) just measured my blood 'tension'...

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Quite right! My high blood pressure is medically describes as hyper-tension so i always interpret the word "tension" as pressure now except when i mean voltage. It is so tedious meaning tension...

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeBlamires
MikeBlamires
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It did not accept "The tension is elevated" - okay it is slightly verbose but I believe it has the same meaning. Is it because elevated is a verb?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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= "La tensión esta elevado."

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Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Elevada

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Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lifeseyephoto

Tall tension.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/manuelsg02

Is "The blood pressure is high" accepted? Whenever my mom measures her blood pressure, she says "Tensión" for blood pressure. She's a native speaker.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lomkey
Lomkey
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Is this an actual phrase in Spanish, or just a literal translation of the English expression?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ashferi

For a moment I thought she said "la atencion es alta" so I had to replay it in slow motion XD it was just me?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bukusher
Bukusher
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I didn't replay it and got it wrong.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeanJam
BeanJam
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THE ELECTRO-TENSION IS TOO HIGH! TAKE COVERRRRR!

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Reply1 year ago